B1330 - Religion and Beliefs bill 2018 Watch

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DayneD89
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What is this?/I'm confused
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B1330 - Religion and Beliefs bill 2018, Joecphillips seconded by CountBrandenberg
A
BILL TO
Remove religion from the equality act.

BE IT ENACTED by The Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons in this present Parliament assembled, in accordance with the provisions of the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949, and by the authority of the same, as follows:—

1- Repeal
(1) In Part 2, Chapter 1 of the Equality Act 2010 remove from section (4): religion or belief;
(2) Repeal Section 10 of the equality act 2010

2- Citation and commencement
(1) This Act extends to the United Kingdom.
(2) The provisions of this Act come into force on Royal Assent
(3) This Act may be referred to as the Religion and Beliefs Act 2018

Notes:
“Religion and Beliefs” should not be protected characteristics as ultimately they are a choice and you can tell a lot about a person from the beliefs they hold, all ideas and belief systems should be subject to civil scrutiny.

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04MR17
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:facepalm:
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JMR2019.
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No, it someone should not be treated any differently just because of the religious beliefs they have. The law does not prohibit the scrutiny of religions as the notes seem to suggest.
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username2718212
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This is a poor bill and not only this but the formatting looking extraordinarily sloppy. I am concerned that CountBrandenburg seconded this (unless, of course, my right honourable friend merely wished this to come before the House for debate). The rationale given by the right honourable gentleman is honestly insufficient to remove this section of the Equality Act 2010 and I suggest the right honourable gentleman really gives this kind of thing a rest.
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CatusStarbright
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Nay - "religion or belief" belongs in the list of protected characteristics, in my opinion, and the notes on this bill are far from able to persuade me to vote in favour.
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username1524603
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(Original post by JMR2018)
No, it someone should not be treated any differently just because of the religious beliefs they have. The law does not prohibit the scrutiny of religions as the notes seem to suggest.
Religion is unfounded faith in something, religious individuals should be treated differently because research by Imperial College London finds religious individuals are less intelligent than atheists. Religion should not be a protection from discrimination, religion should be used as a way to discriminate against those who believe as the start of a process secularise society.
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CountBrandenburg
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(Original post by Vitiate)
This is a poor bill and not only this but the formatting looking extraordinarily sloppy. I am concerned that CountBrandenburg seconded this (unless, of course, my right honourable friend merely wished this to come before the House for debate). The rationale given by the right honourable gentleman is honestly insufficient to remove this section of the Equality Act 2010 and I suggest the right honourable gentleman really gives this kind of thing a rest.
It’s a bill by Joe, as said in a chat, I might as well act as a bit like Joe for the meantime, as in since he’s not an mp at the moment ( as in bring bills to the floor in the way he says he does) Joe does have a point that perhaps it being a characteristic that is protected, you can’t exactly criticise the set of beliefs without perhaps causing some sort of discrimination of the point. Religion is a freedom people choose to follow, and even if I don’t describe myself as a religious person, I wouldn’t allow for grounds to be discriminated on. Should we remove this, it would have the appearance of intolerance and perhaps at times prohibit debate. Naturally it’s more of an intrigue on my part, though I can’t be sure of Joe’s intentions.
No worries, Kallum, I wouldn’t vote Aye on this if it entered division and i guess it does bring debate to the house in some weird ways 😉
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username1450924
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No. I dont know much about the equality act / equality law but I know discrimination on the grounds of religion is wrong.
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JMR2019.
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(Original post by Jacob E)
Religion is unfounded faith in something, religious individuals should be treated differently because research by Imperial College London finds religious individuals are less intelligent than atheists. Religion should not be a protection from discrimination, religion should be used as a way to discriminate against those who believe as the start of a process secularise society.
Ummm so are saying we should discriminate against religious people because they are less clever?
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username1524603
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(Original post by JMR2018)
Ummm so are saying we should discriminate against religious people because they are not clever?
I am saying religious groups neither deserve legal protections to conduct their activities nor should religions not be open to scrutiny.
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Saunders16
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Aye
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JMR2019.
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(Original post by Jacob E)
I am saying religious groups neither deserve legal protections to conduct their activities nor should religions not be open to scrutiny.
That's not what the law does, the law stops people of any religion to be discriminated against. That doesn't mean you cannot challenge or scrutinise their beliefs, it just means for example, that you cannot refuse someone a job just because they belong to a particular religion. Nor does it mean people of religion are given more rights than people who have no religion.
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username1524603
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(Original post by JMR2018)
That's not what the law does, the law stops people of any religion to be discriminated against. That doesn't mean you cannot challenge or scrutinise their beliefs, it just means for example, that you cannot refuse someone a job just because they belong to a particular religion. Nor does it mean people of religion are given more rights than people who have no religion.
I know that, what I am saying is religious groups should not be given legal protections to practice their religion in the workplace, and employers should be able to refuse a job using religion as a justification.
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JMR2019.
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(Original post by Jacob E)
I know that, what I am saying is religious groups should not be given legal protections to practice their religion in the workplace, and employers should be able to refuse a job using religion as a justification.
Well I disagree, freedom of belief and freedom to practice your religion are basic human rights and values which this country should embrace and has had a record of embracing in the past.
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Joep95
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(Original post by JMR2018)
Well I disagree, freedom of belief and freedom to practice your religion are basic human rights and values which this country should embrace and has had a record of embracing in the past.
This doesn’t end those
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Thrillanthropist
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Good Luck getting this passed.

Nay. Religion should be a protected characteristic, and just because someone holds an opinion of a particular religion, they may be really prejudiced and unfamiliar with the religion (especially if they haven't studied it). A person's religion doesn't tell you everything about the beliefs they hold, as different people within a religion view things differently and generalising is all-too-easy and all-too-common. Just because someone may scrutinise a belief or a belief system, no matter how civilly, does not mean that they should be allowed to discriminate based on it.

Whether or not we should get rid of protected characteristics altogether is a different issue, but since we're having them then religion should certainly be on there.
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username1524603
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(Original post by JMR2018)
Well I disagree, freedom of belief and freedom to practice your religion are basic human rights and values which this country should embrace and has had a record of embracing in the past.
Freedom to choose a religion should not be a human right because the harms coming from believing are stronger than the need to be free.
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JMR2019.
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(Original post by Jacob E)
Freedom to choose a religion should not be a human right because the harms coming from believing are stronger than the need to be free.
That's only a subjective opinion haha
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username1524603
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(Original post by JMR2018)
That's only a subjective opinion haha
The idea of human rights is subjective, deciding what should be a human right is a subjective decision and deciding what the harms are is subjective. Subjectivity cannot be avoided when debating a bill like this because the topic asks MPs to make a subjective decision.
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JMR2019.
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(Original post by joecphillips)
This doesn’t end those
Well it allows people to be discriminated against just because of the beliefs they hold. In my opinion that is not freedom of belief.
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