slimthicc
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PLS HELP!!! I need to apply to my 6th form asap but im having some trouble w picking the right a levels. at uni, i want to do medicine, and i'm aiming for quite a good uni, not oxbridge, but somewhere like imperial college or kings college, prob in London. I usually get 8/9 in all my subjects at gcse (A*), and maths is probably the subject I'm best at, BUT I FIND IT SO BORING. for my a levels I'm def taking biology and chemistry, and I really want to take psychology as I think it seems sm more interesting than maths. will I be able to apply for many good unis with just two sciences without maths, or do you think it would be a lot more beneficial if I had maths? I wouldn't mind taking maths TOO much, its just that I know I would enjoy psychology much more. and I'm aware that could take 4 subjects, which I think I'd be able to cope with, its just that I'd rather do really well in 3 and focus on them.
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GalGirl101
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Take the psychology. You don't need maths for Kings and Imperial medicine. If you have maths you're not gonna get a good grade.
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ageshallnot
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(Original post by slimthicc)
PLS HELP!!! I need to apply to my 6th form asap but im having some trouble w picking the right a levels. at uni, i want to do medicine, and i'm aiming for quite a good uni, not oxbridge, but somewhere like imperial college or kings college, prob in London. I usually get 8/9 in all my subjects at gcse (A*), and maths is probably the subject I'm best at, BUT I FIND IT SO BORING. for my a levels I'm def taking biology and chemistry, and I really want to take psychology as I think it seems sm more interesting than maths. will I be able to apply for many good unis with just two sciences without maths, or do you think it would be a lot more beneficial if I had maths? I wouldn't mind taking maths TOO much, its just that I know I would enjoy psychology much more. and I'm aware that could take 4 subjects, which I think I'd be able to cope with, its just that I'd rather do really well in 3 and focus on them.
Try looking at

https://www.themedicportal.com/appli...o-be-a-doctor/

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elmiller
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You could always take 4 subjects to begin with then drop one later in the year when you figure out what the courses are like or how much work you think it's going to be. Universities may not say they want maths but it can sway admissions tutors to be more likely to give you an offer.
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nj23
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I POSTED THIS ON ANOTHER THREAD ABOUT SOMEONE CONSIDERING TAKING A-LEVEL HISTORY, SO THE INFORMATION MAY NOT BE DIRECTLY APPLICABLE, BUT IT MAY BE WORTH TAKING WHAT I SAY INTO ACCOUNT:

I do Biology, Chemistry and History at A-Level, and I have applied for Medicine this year.
Chemistry Biology keeps all medical universities open to you, except Oxbridge, which will require you to do Physics or Maths on top of the other 2. But Chemistry Biology are a MUST.
Do not do 4 subjects - it does nothing for you except stress you out. Some students get the impression that if you do 4, you are at some sort of advantage. However, on results day, if you don’t open that letter and get 3 As, you are done, and 2 Bs instead of an A does not cut it.
History is a challenging subject to do with 2 sciences, but it’s honestly the best decision I made. Biology Chemistry is very driven by learning concepts and studying, which can get very monotonous. History lessons are fun as you get to have debates, talk about these concepts and express your view articulately. This really helped me at MMI interviews as it maintained my ability to think fast and give detailed responses, which many students struggle with. At the end of the day, getting an offer is entirely dependent on your performance at interview, so it’s something to think about.
If you do Biology Chemistry History, you will be put at an advantage to apply to study Medicine at Hull and York Medical School, as their admissions policy states that priority is given to students who study Biology Chemistry a humanities subject. Otherwise, you are on an equal playing field as those studying Biology Chemistry Physics or Maths (except for Oxbridge where you would receive an immediate pre-interview rejection).
How you did at any subject at GCSE does not mean you’ll do well at it at A-Level, including for Biology and Chemistry. A-Levels are GCSEs, but on so much crack that it is virtually impossible to compare the two as they become 2 completely different entities.
So, definitely do Biology Chemistry, and do the subject you enjoy most out of Maths, Physics or History.
I was in the exact same position as you at the end of Year 11, and someone telling me to apply to what enjoy really cleared up my vision, and it really worked out for me.

(Original post by gradeguesser)
thanks a lot for that, very useful. I think maths will be the one for me, but i’ll definitely speak to the college about it before starting in September. Good luck in medicine and whatever you go on to do
If Maths is good for you, great!
One thing I’d mention just in case you are still considering changing Maths is that your third subject must be a “traditional” (difficult) subject. These include:
(Biology Chemistry)
Physics
Maths (not Further Maths)
History
Geography
Economics
Any traditional or modern foreign language
English Literature (but not English Language)

Some universities don’t mind artistic subjects (i.e Music, Drama and Art), but it’s best not to in order to keep lots if options open to you.

Completely black-listed subjects by most universities are subjects like:
Health and Social Care (my friend fell into this trap)
Critical Thinking
General Studies
Law
Psychology (but is accepted at a select few)
Sociology
Philosophy / Religious Studies
History of Art
Geology
Accounting
Business Studies
Media Studies
English Language
Classical Civilisation

Basically any other wishy-washy subject that seems like a fluffy subject. Stick to the traditional subjects.

I hope you make the right decision for you!
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Kirby...
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[QUOTE=nj23;76084922]I POSTED THIS ON ANOTHER THREAD ABOUT SOMEONE CONSIDERING TAKING A-LEVEL HISTORY, SO THE INFORMATION MAY NOT BE DIRECTLY APPLICABLE, BUT IT MAY BE WORTH TAKING WHAT I SAY INTO ACCOUNT:

I do Biology, Chemistry and History at A-Level, and I have applied for Medicine this year.
Chemistry Biology keeps all medical universities open to you, except Oxbridge, which will require you to do Physics or Maths on top of the other 2. But Chemistry Biology are a MUST.
Do not do 4 subjects - it does nothing for you except stress you out. Some students get the impression that if you do 4, you are at some sort of advantage. However, on results day, if you don’t open that letter and get 3 As, you are done, and 2 Bs instead of an A does not cut it.
History is a challenging subject to do with 2 sciences, but it’s honestly the best decision I made. Biology Chemistry is very driven by learning concepts and studying, which can get very monotonous. History lessons are fun as you get to have debates, talk about these concepts and express your view articulately. This really helped me at MMI interviews as it maintained my ability to think fast and give detailed responses, which many students struggle with. At the end of the day, getting an offer is entirely dependent on your performance at interview, so it’s something to think about.
If you do Biology Chemistry History, you will be put at an advantage to apply to study Medicine at Hull and York Medical School, as their admissions policy states that priority is given to students who study Biology Chemistry a humanities subject. Otherwise, you are on an equal playing field as those studying Biology Chemistry Physics or Maths (except for Oxbridge where you would receive an immediate pre-interview rejection).
How you did at any subject at GCSE does not mean you’ll do well at it at A-Level, including for Biology and Chemistry. A-Levels are GCSEs, but on so much crack that it is virtually impossible to compare the two as they become 2 completely different entities.
So, definitely do Biology Chemistry, and do the subject you enjoy most out of Maths, Physics or History.
I was in the exact same position as you at the end of Year 11, and someone telling me to apply to what enjoy really cleared up my vision, and it really worked out for me.

If Maths is good for you, great!
One thing I’d mention just in case you are still considering changing Maths is that your third subject must be a “traditional” (difficult) subject. These include:
(Biology Chemistry)
Physics
Maths (not Further Maths)
History
Geography
Economics
Any traditional or modern foreign language
English Literature (but not English Language)

Some universities don’t mind artistic subjects (i.e Music, Drama and Art), but it’s best not to in order to keep lots if options open to you.

Completely black-listed subjects by most universities are subjects like:
Health and Social Care (my friend fell into this trap)
Critical Thinking
General Studies
Law
Psychology (but is accepted at a select few)
Sociology
Philosophy / Religious Studies
History of Art
Geology
Accounting
Business Studies
Media Studies
English Language
Classical Civilisation

Basically any other wishy-washy subject that seems like a fluffy subject. Stick to the traditional subjects.

I hope you make the right decision for you!
(Original post by nj23)
I POSTED THIS ON ANOTHER THREAD ABOUT SOMEONE CONSIDERING TAKING A-LEVEL HISTORY, SO THE INFORMATION MAY NOT BE DIRECTLY APPLICABLE, BUT IT MAY BE WORTH TAKING WHAT I SAY INTO ACCOUNT:

I do Biology, Chemistry and History at A-Level, and I have applied for Medicine this year.
Chemistry Biology keeps all medical universities open to you, except Oxbridge, which will require you to do Physics or Maths on top of the other 2. But Chemistry Biology are a MUST.
Do not do 4 subjects - it does nothing for you except stress you out. Some students get the impression that if you do 4, you are at some sort of advantage. However, on results day, if you don’t open that letter and get 3 As, you are done, and 2 Bs instead of an A does not cut it.
History is a challenging subject to do with 2 sciences, but it’s honestly the best decision I made. Biology Chemistry is very driven by learning concepts and studying, which can get very monotonous. History lessons are fun as you get to have debates, talk about these concepts and express your view articulately. This really helped me at MMI interviews as it maintained my ability to think fast and give detailed responses, which many students struggle with. At the end of the day, getting an offer is entirely dependent on your performance at interview, so it’s something to think about.
If you do Biology Chemistry History, you will be put at an advantage to apply to study Medicine at Hull and York Medical School, as their admissions policy states that priority is given to students who study Biology Chemistry a humanities subject. Otherwise, you are on an equal playing field as those studying Biology Chemistry Physics or Maths (except for Oxbridge where you would receive an immediate pre-interview rejection).
How you did at any subject at GCSE does not mean you’ll do well at it at A-Level, including for Biology and Chemistry. A-Levels are GCSEs, but on so much crack that it is virtually impossible to compare the two as they become 2 completely different entities.
So, definitely do Biology Chemistry, and do the subject you enjoy most out of Maths, Physics or History.
I was in the exact same position as you at the end of Year 11, and someone telling me to apply to what enjoy really cleared up my vision, and it really worked out for me.

If Maths is good for you, great!
One thing I’d mention just in case you are still considering changing Maths is that your third subject must be a “traditional” (difficult) subject. These include:
(Biology Chemistry)
Physics
Maths (not Further Maths)
History
Geography
Economics
Any traditional or modern foreign language
English Literature (but not English Language)

Some universities don’t mind artistic subjects (i.e Music, Drama and Art), but it’s best not to in order to keep lots if options open to you.

Completely black-listed subjects by most universities are subjects like:
Health and Social Care (my friend fell into this trap)
Critical Thinking
General Studies
Law
Psychology (but is accepted at a select few)
Sociology
Philosophy / Religious Studies
History of Art
Geology
Accounting
Business Studies
Media Studies
English Language
Classical Civilisation

Basically any other wishy-washy subject that seems like a fluffy subject. Stick to the traditional subjects.

I hope you make the right decision for you!
What type of universities accept psychology? I thought psychology was only a bad option if you tried to replace a science with it.
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nj23
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(Original post by Mr_Robot)
What type of universities accept psychology? I thought psychology was only a bad option if you tried to replace a science with it.
Sorry, perhaps I wasn’t clear enough previously. What I meant was, it is better to do 3 traditional subjects as opposed to 2 traditional subjects and a “soft” subject. For example:
Put yourself in an admissions tutor’s shoes - you have 2 students that have the exact same academic statistics and similar non-academic scores (personal statements), but one takes Biology, Chemistry and History (or any other traditional subject), the other takes Biology, Chemistry and Psychology. They will most likely pick History over Psychology.
Academics when applying for Medicine are all about giving yourself the best shot at getting that interview, and if you are capable of doing traditional subjects and getting an A, why limit that possibility right from the get-go.
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Kirby...
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(Original post by nj23)
Sorry, perhaps I wasn’t clear enough previously. What I meant was, it is better to do 3 traditional subjects as opposed to 2 traditional subjects and a “soft” subject. For example:
Put yourself in an admissions tutor’s shoes - you have 2 students that have the exact same academic statistics and similar non-academic scores (personal statements), but one takes Biology, Chemistry and History (or any other traditional subject), the other takes Biology, Chemistry and Psychology. They will most likely pick History over Psychology.
Academics when applying for Medicine are all about giving yourself the best shot at getting that interview, and if you are capable of doing traditional subjects and getting an A, why limit that possibility right from the get-go.
Would A level history, English literature and psychology pair well?

Sorry for asking you questions 😂
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nj23
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(Original post by Mr_Robot)
Would A level history, English literature and psychology pair well?

Sorry for asking you questions 😂
For Medicine? No, you'll need one of these 3 to give you the best shot:

Biology, Chemistry and History
Biology, Chemistry and English Literature
Biology, Chemistry and Psychology (least preferable)
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Kirby...
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(Original post by nj23)
For Medicine? No, you'll need one of these 3 to give you the best shot:

Biology, Chemistry and History
Biology, Chemistry and English Literature
Biology, Chemistry and Psychology (least preferable)
No. for Law
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nj23
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(Original post by Mr_Robot)
No. for Law
Oh sorry! :colondollar:

I haven't had much experience with applying for Law, but my friend got 5 offers for Law by doing History, Law and Sociology. But he didn't apply for very reputable universities (i.e. Russell Groups).

So yeah, your subject choices would be totally fine. To be on the safe side, choose 2 traditional subjects (English Literature and History) and one 'soft' one (Psychology). Law isn't as competitive as Medicine, so you won't have to necessarily do 3 traditional subjects.
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