How do uni's decide whether to accept minority groups?

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medicbraff
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Are uni's obligated to accept some minority groups (gender, ethnicity, socio-economic background, disability etc.)?

Is there some sort of policy that the uni's have to adhere to that says for example "you must accept x amount of minority groups into this particular course"?

Are there incentives for uni's for accepting minority groups onto their courses? If so, what are they? What motivates uni's to do this?

If 99 out of 100 applicants to a course were all the same gender/ethnicity/socioeconomic background will the single applicant who falls into a minority group have a greater chance of an offer with all other things being equal?
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by medicbraff)
Are uni's obligated to accept some minority groups (gender, ethnicity, socio-economic background, disability etc.)?

Is there some sort of policy that the uni's have to adhere to that says for example "you must accept x amount of minority groups into this particular course"?

Are there incentives for uni's for accepting minority groups onto their courses? If so, what are they? What motivates uni's to do this?

If 99 out of 100 applicants to a course were all the same gender/ethnicity/socioeconomic background will the single applicant who falls into a minority group have a greater chance of an offer with all other things being equal?
OFFA

https://www.offa.org.uk/
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returnmigrant
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(Original post by medicbraff)
Are uni's obligated to accept some minority groups (gender, ethnicity, socio-economic background, disability etc.)?
No.

(Original post by medicbraff)
Is there some sort of policy that the uni's have to adhere to that says for example "you must accept x amount of minority groups into this particular course"?
No.

(Original post by medicbraff)
Are there incentives for uni's for accepting minority groups onto their courses?
No.

(Original post by medicbraff)
If 99 out of 100 applicants to a course were all the same gender/ethnicity/socioeconomic background will the single applicant who falls into a minority group have a greater chance of an offer with all other things being equal?
No.
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medicbraff
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(Original post by returnmigrant)
No.



No.



No.



No.
Incorrect. All answers are "Yes".

I've answered my own question, but for the sake of anyone reading this thread here are some answers after some quick digging:

The government (SFC for Scotland for example) sets out a policy to ensure students from certain minority groups (e.g. a deprived area postcode in the following example) are given a place. For example, medical schools in Scotland are obligated (they must) give 10 places to study medicine each year to students from disadvantaged backgrounds (includes deprived areas).

Nicola Sturgeon has set targets for Scottish uni's to increase their proportion of students from deprived areas across all their courses.

Also, i'm curious about the female:male ratio of medical school applicants. Looking at the stats for several med schools, in the region of 60% or more of applicants are female, but a higher proportion of males are interviewed and/or given offers (usually 5% or more in relation).

I'm sure there are all sorts of government guidelines based on many factors, and nobody knows each uni's policies (this includes contextual offers).

In terms of incentive, if a uni accepts students from many different countries for example they could (and do, e.g. Aberdeen) claim this on their website. In turn, attracting international applicants from a mixed pool, attracting brighter students/promoting the uni/increasing presence. Again, i'm sure there are many more incentives.
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returnmigrant
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You seem to be assuming that 'deprived area postcode' = ethnic minority, or at best, confusing the two.

Universities may have 'targets' that they would like to achieve for 'widening participation' initiatives - this is part of central government's agenda not something instigated by Unis individually. Target does not equal 'preferential treatment' or 'take regardless of ability'. It means 'How do we encourage these applicants who are under-represented to apply to our University, and then go Firm', and 'How do we support them when they are here'.

Suggest you stop jumping to conclusions and do some background reading. Just two examples : https://www.dur.ac.uk/dece/themes/participation/ and http://www.exeter.ac.uk/undergraduat...participation/
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cat_mac
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(Original post by medicbraff)
Incorrect. All answers are "Yes".

I've answered my own question, but for the sake of anyone reading this thread here are some answers after some quick digging:

The government (SFC for Scotland for example) sets out a policy to ensure students from certain minority groups (e.g. a deprived area postcode in the following example) are given a place. For example, medical schools in Scotland are obligated (they must) give 10 places to study medicine each year to students from disadvantaged backgrounds (includes deprived areas).

Nicola Sturgeon has set targets for Scottish uni's to increase their proportion of students from deprived areas across all their courses.

Also, i'm curious about the female:male ratio of medical school applicants. Looking at the stats for several med schools, in the region of 60% or more of applicants are female, but a higher proportion of males are interviewed and/or given offers (usually 5% or more in relation).

I'm sure there are all sorts of government guidelines based on many factors, and nobody knows each uni's policies (this includes contextual offers).

In terms of incentive, if a uni accepts students from many different countries for example they could (and do, e.g. Aberdeen) claim this on their website. In turn, attracting international applicants from a mixed pool, attracting brighter students/promoting the uni/increasing presence. Again, i'm sure there are many more incentives.
All of your examples are Scottish, do you have any evidence of this in the rest of the UK? They’re also medicine students? And all of your examples are from deprived area postcode, which isn’t what a minority student is.

Most of all, why ask the question if you already know the answer?
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username1292215
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I have the answer to your question

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They decide to accept minority groups if they have the appropriate grades, like everyone else. Theres also slightly reduced offers for those who appear to be from a lower standard school (some unis do this)
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medicbraff
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(Original post by cat_mac)
All of your examples are Scottish, do you have any evidence of this in the rest of the UK? They’re also medicine students? And all of your examples are from deprived area postcode, which isn’t what a minority student is.

Most of all, why ask the question if you already know the answer?
I have shown evidence of this happening in some unis. Therefore answering my question that uni's in fact DO have policies in place to ensure minority students (in this case minority students in deprived areas) are given university places.

I have not researched every university in Scotland, Ireland, Wales and England, nor every single course of each uni. I have given evidence of an example (Scottish med schools). They all have different policies (each course within each uni within each country).

In some uni's only 3-4% of students are from deprived areas e.g. socio-economically deprived areas = minority student. This is what the "widening participation" policies are all about. To ensure that these students are not disadvantaged.

After some not so great (or true) answers, i decided to research more and finally answered my own questions. I thought it'll be useful to post the answers here for anyone reading the thread in the future.
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medicbraff
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(Original post by returnmigrant)
You seem to be assuming that 'deprived area postcode' = ethnic minority, or at best, confusing the two.

Universities may have 'targets' that they would like to achieve for 'widening participation' initiatives - this is part of central government's agenda not something instigated by Unis individually. Target does not equal 'preferential treatment' or 'take regardless of ability'. It means 'How do we encourage these applicants who are under-represented to apply to our University, and then go Firm', and 'How do we support them when they are here'.

Suggest you stop jumping to conclusions and do some background reading. Just two examples : https://www.dur.ac.uk/dece/themes/participation/ and http://www.exeter.ac.uk/undergraduat...participation/
The example i gave above : 10 places MUST be given in Scottish med schools each year to minority group students (deprived areas in this case). The SFC enforces this.

You seem to be confusing a minority student to an ethnic minority student.

A minority group student is a student that is differentiated from the majority:

"A minority group refers to a category of people differentiated from the social majority, those who hold the majority of positions of social power in a society, and it may be defined by law. Rather than a relational "social group", as the term would indicate, "minority group" refers to the above-described. The differentiation can be based on one or more observable human characteristics, including: ethnicity, race, religion, disability, gender, wealth, health or sexual orientation. "
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medicbraff
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(Original post by SuperHuman98)
I have the answer to your question

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They decide to accept minority groups if they have the appropriate grades, like everyone else. Theres also slightly reduced offers for those who appear to be from a lower standard school (some unis do this)
The SFC enforces the widening participation policy in Scotland. 10 med school places MUST be given to these students each year in each uni. So that's not entirely true.
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cat_mac
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(Original post by medicbraff)
I have shown evidence of this happening in some unis. Therefore answering my question that uni's in fact DO have policies in place to ensure minority students (in this case minority students in deprived areas) are given university places.

I have not researched every university in Scotland, Ireland, Wales and England, nor every single course of each uni. I have given evidence of an example (Scottish med schools). They all have different policies (each course within each uni within each country).

In some uni's only 3-4% of students are from deprived areas e.g. socio-economically deprived areas = minority student. This is what the "widening participation" policies are all about. To ensure that these students are not disadvantaged.

After some not so great (or true) answers, i decided to research more and finally answered my own questions. I thought it'll be useful to post the answers here for anyone reading the thread in the future.
Scottish medical schools just seem like a very specific target for what was presented as a general question, and I don’t think most people’s idea of a minority is a student from a deprived area.

What about ethnic minorities? Or disabled people? Coming from a certain area isn’t a protected characteristic or a minority as far as I know. On an individual basis I guess coming from a low income family will get someone some extra money etc but it doesn’t make them a ‘minority’
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Andrew97
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It’s based on whether you meet the grade criteria I imagine. Being a member of a minority group should in no way be factor.
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