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    So once again the "intellectual" left have decided to try and no-platform speakers they don't like on Campus

    http://huffp.st/NuB4v3L

    Come to uni and get a degree in Marxist hooliganism - free speech for all providing it's what I want to hear
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    (Original post by Hazzer1998)
    So once again the "intellectual" left have decided to try and no-platform speakers they don't like on Campus

    http://huffp.st/NuB4v3L

    Come to uni and get a degree in Marxist hooliganism - free speech for all providing it's what I want to hear
    its UWE so they aren't that intelligent anyway
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    the Great British Public will draw their own conclusions about this shameful attack on democracy and free speech.
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    (Original post by Hazzer1998)
    So once again the "intellectual" left have decided to try and no-platform speakers they don't like on Campus

    http://huffp.st/NuB4v3L

    Come to uni and get a degree in Marxist hooliganism - free speech for all providing it's what I want to hear
    They didn't attack him. He even stated that no one attacked him.

    There was a scuffle between protestors and people at the event and he tried to break it up.
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    What a non-event.

    Anyone who regards this as violent, aggressive, or an example of thuggery would be advised to not enter a British pub, attend a football match or go to a music gig. You'd wet in fear the moment someone got boisterous.

    Rees-Mogg summed it by saying he has had "worse confrontations with The Guardian".
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    I saw 6 AntiFa posters in and around the new SU at UWE in my last month at that University. I'm not surprised.

    JRM has made comments about it, though, and it doesn't seem like he's that fussed.
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    (Original post by Sulfolobus)
    What a non-event.

    Anyone who regards this as violent, aggressive, or an example of thuggery would be advised to not enter a British pub, attend a football match or go to a music gig.
    This was a speaking event by a Member of Parliament. It is completely idiotic to compare it to a pub or a football match.

    If these... individuals are even students they should be kicked out of their courses, or at the very least heavily disciplined by their university. This behaviour is entirely unacceptable, and entirely incompatible with what ought to be the general ethos of higher education: reasoned argument and free consideration of new ideas.

    As a general rule, if you're on the side of the people who are shouting incoherently, with their faces covered, at what was supposed to be a calm and civilised speaking event, you should question yourself.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    This was a speaking event by a Member of Parliament. It is completely idiotic to compare it to a pub or a football match.

    If these... individuals are even students they should be kicked out of their courses, or at the very least heavily disciplined by their university. This behaviour is entirely unacceptable, and entirely incompatible with what ought to be the general ethos of higher education: reasoned argument and free consideration of new ideas.

    As a general rule, if you're on the side of the people who are shouting incoherently, with their faces covered, at what was supposed to be a calm and civilised speaking event, you should question yourself.
    And things get heated when politics are brought into it. I know the usual suspects on TSR are going to get outraged over this but it is a non-event, it is handbags at nine paces.

    Britain has a long history of protest. It is central to our modern democracy, it is central to our British values. I assume Rees-Mogg recognises that, which is why he has responded with a shrug of the shoulders.

    That you wish these people to be kicked off their courses says a lot about you and your attitude to our values.
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    (Original post by Sulfolobus)
    That you wish these people to be kicked off their courses says a lot about you and your attitude to our values.
    I would be happy to see them removed because they are not suitable candidates for higher education, and are disruptive to others' learning experience.

    The idea that storming into a room in order to stop a speaking event organised so that interested students could hear and consider ideas, to silence reasoned argument from an elected representative of the public by way of incoherent bawling, is reflective of some deep British value is not worth dealing with in any depth, tbh.
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    Thought this was SOAS tbqh
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    This was a speaking event by a Member of Parliament. It is completely idiotic to compare it to a pub or a football match.

    If these... individuals are even students they should be kicked out of their courses, or at the very least heavily disciplined by their university. This behaviour is entirely unacceptable, and entirely incompatible with what ought to be the general ethos of higher education: reasoned argument and free consideration of new ideas.

    As a general rule, if you're on the side of the people who are shouting incoherently, with their faces covered, at what was supposed to be a calm and civilised speaking event, you should question yourself.
    So your answer to their apparent transgression against free speech is to remove their right to free speech? It's like you people don't even listen to the drivel that comes out of your own mouths.
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    (Original post by mojojojo101)
    So your answer to their apparent transgression against free speech is to remove their right to free speech? It's like you people don't even listen to the drivel that comes out of your own mouths.
    I have trouble believing that you people truly believe that ruining an event like this for a gathered audience of interested students, replacing actual considered speech with thoughtless yelling, is beyond criticism as a mere expression of free speech.

    In terms of the cultural, as opposed to legal, ideal of free speech, what is actually worth something is the genuine exchange and consideration of ideas. That is what I wish universities would take stronger steps to promote, as I've indicated. This sort of display does not fall under that.

    In legal terms, the protesters should not be subject to any state sanction for this sort of display. Universities, however, are private institutions. They of course do not have to do anything, but in my view they should take it upon themselves to take such steps against students as are necessary to maintain their ideals of free and open debate.
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    (Original post by Sulfolobus)
    And things get heated when politics are brought into it. I know the usual suspects on TSR are going to get outraged over this but it is a non-event, it is handbags at nine paces.

    Britain has a long history of protest. It is central to our modern democracy, it is central to our British values. I assume Rees-Mogg recognises that, which is why he has responded with a shrug of the shoulders.

    That you wish these people to be kicked off their courses says a lot about you and your attitude to our values.
    Whether it's commonplace or not, I've had enough of this ****. Anyone who thinks it's OK to dress up in a mask and shout abuse at people is wrong; anyone who thinks that physically attacking, obstructing or assaulting another person is wrong.

    You shrug your shoulders and say it doesn't matter: how many people are put off going into politics for this very reason? How many voices are not heard out of fear? How many women are put off a political career because it's become almost inevitable they'll get rape threats, screamed at and possibly even shot in the street for doing a public service?

    How about people start behaving themselves, and those who can't be civil - or are just unhinged - get ostracised rather than excused? Because I'm sick of it. It doesn't contain itself to politics either: that we have to have posters up on buses, in council offices and even in shops and pubs telling people not to abuse or assault staff really does tell us something about our society - or at least a small minority of our society that, out of some misplaced bleeding-heartedness, the majority are willing to ignore.
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    (Original post by mojojojo101)
    So your answer to their apparent transgression against free speech is to remove their right to free speech? It's like you people don't even listen to the drivel that comes out of your own mouths.
    They can say what they like about issues: however, I would certainly chuck them out for being abusive, shouting or otherwise behaving in a way that's not acceptable in decent society. The principle of free speech does not give you carte blanche to interrupt people, to shout over them, to abuse, to ruin events and especially not to start throwing your fists around.
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    People truly underestimate the seriousness of how the far-left have been fomenting hatred and totalitarianism among the youth, through schools and unis. These sorry creatures have had their brains cooked with their practically worthless degrees on social studies, politics and the like and it would all be laughable if they weren't doing the bidding of the most unpalatable people in the world.

    Personally, it would be a one-way ticket through the door or the window. We dig our own grave by tolerating it.
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    (Original post by Sulfolobus)
    What a non-event.

    Anyone who regards this as violent, aggressive, or an example of thuggery would be advised to not enter a British pub, attend a football match or go to a music gig. You'd wet in fear the moment someone got boisterous.

    Rees-Mogg summed it by saying he has had "worse confrontations with The Guardian".
    It is still in my view unacceptable behaviour and will only make people think better of Jacob Rees-Mogg and his views. Which given we would almost all be worse off with his desired type of Brexit is a concern.

    I live in an area with a nasty right wing Tory council (even by the Tories standards) and this kind of behaviour increases the chance of my still having this instead of a hung council after the May London Brough elections.
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    (Original post by KingHarold)
    It is still in my view unacceptable behaviour and will only make people think better of Jacob Rees-Mogg and his views. Which given we would almost all be worse off with his desired type of Brexit is a concern.

    I live in an area with a nasty right wing Tory council (even by the Tories standards) and this kind of behaviour increases the chance of my still having this instead of a hung council after the May London Brough elections.
    I doubt this will have any impact at all. Thus forum vastly overestimates the extent to which the general population will be aware of this incident, let alone care about it.
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    (Original post by zhog)
    People truly underestimate the seriousness of how the far-left have been fomenting hatred and totalitarianism among the youth, through schools and unis. These sorry creatures have had their brains cooked with their practically worthless degrees on social studies, politics and the like and it would all be laughable if they weren't doing the bidding of the most unpalatable people in the world.

    Personally, it would be a one-way ticket through the door or the window. We dig our own grave by tolerating it.
    Have a day off, zhog.
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    They're worse than the supposed fascists they continuously wax paranoid about. Scum of the earth, eager to get violent (usually in a mob) or to suppress free speech because they think it's justified, because some screw is loose in their propagandised heads. Can't stand them.

    JRM is better than a thousand of these churlish, limp-wristed manchildren.
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    (Original post by Sulfolobus)
    And things get heated when politics are brought into it. I know the usual suspects on TSR are going to get outraged over this but it is a non-event, it is handbags at nine paces.

    Britain has a long history of protest. It is central to our modern democracy, it is central to our British values. I assume Rees-Mogg recognises that, which is why he has responded with a shrug of the shoulders.

    That you wish these people to be kicked off their courses says a lot about you and your attitude to our values.
    As a taxpayer, I certainly object to their tax-subsidised degrees coming at my expense, yeah. If they want the government to subsidise their mostly worthless educations, they have to take the logical conclusion of that along with it.
 
 
 
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