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P76 - Bowel cancer screening kits to be sent out at regular intervals to adults watch

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    97% of patients diagnosed with stage I bowel cancer survive for five years after diagnosis, this falls to 7% for patients with stage IV bowel cancer. Average bowel cancer survival rates for all diagnosed cases are behind the European average, with Britain falling behind former Communist countries not known for quality healthcare. This could be for three reasons; the poor diet of Britons increasing the prevalence of bowel cancer, NHS cancer care not being up to the standards it should, and inadequate screening diagnosing bowel cancer in the later stages when survival is less likely.

    In Australia, adults are sent a bowel cancer stool screening kit on their 50th birthday to detect the early stages of bowel cancer. To increase bowel cancer survival rates, this petition calls on the government to change its bowel cancer screening scheme to start sending mandatory screening kits to adults on an annual basis, starting at their 50th birthday to increases the rate of diagnosis of bowel cancer in its early stages, increasing the rate of survival from bowel cancer.
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    (Original post by Jacob E)
    97% of patients diagnosed with stage I bowel cancer survive for five years after diagnosis, this falls to 7% for patients with stage IV bowel cancer. Average bowel cancer survival rates for all diagnosed cases are behind the European average, with Britain falling behind former Communist countries not known for quality healthcare. This could be for three reasons; the poor diet of Britons increasing the prevalence of bowel cancer, NHS cancer care not being up to the standards it should, and inadequate screening diagnosing bowel cancer in the later stages when survival is less likely.

    In Australia, adults are sent a bowel cancer stool screening kit on their 50th birthday to detect the early stages of bowel cancer. To increase bowel cancer survival rates, this petition corrects one the factors for bowel cancer survival rates in Britain being behind the European average by calling on the government to sent screening kits to adults on a triennial basis to diagnose bowel cancer in its early stages, increasing the rate of survival from bowel cancer.
    The UK has such a system already - it starts at 60.
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    (Original post by Muttley79)
    The UK has such a system already - it starts at 60.
    It needs to start earlier and be more frequent because the data shows it is not working.
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    (Original post by Jacob E)
    It needs to start earlier and be more frequent because the data shows it is not working.
    It repeats every two years ... more frequent than Australia.
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    (Original post by Muttley79)
    It repeats every two years ... more frequent than Australia.
    That does not matter, if bowel cancer survival rates are behind the European average, steps need to be taken to improve survival rates. One step is to lower the age of screening to match other countries like Australia, and send out screening kits on an annual basis. I would go further to make returning a completed screening kit mandatory or be left with cost of cancer treatment if bowel cancer is diagnosed later in life.
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    (Original post by Jacob E)
    That does not matter, if bowel cancer survival rates are behind the European average, steps need to be taken to improve survival rates. One step is to lower the age of screening to match other countries like Australia, and send out screening kits on an annual basis. I would go further to make returning a completed screening kit mandatory or be left with cost of cancer treatment if bowel cancer is diagnosed later in life.
    What proportion of people actually do the tests? Everything I've seen said few respond so that is the issue first really.
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    (Original post by Muttley79)
    What proprotion of epople actually do the tests? Everything I've seen said few respond so that is the issue first really.
    That is why completing the tests should be made mandatory.
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    (Original post by Jacob E)
    That is why completing the tests should be made mandatory.
    I would disagree with making them mandatory. If people want to run the risk of having undetected bowel cancer then they are free to do so. The cost and time spent administrating such a mandatory scheme would also be a waste of NHS resources, in my opinion.
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    (Original post by Jacob E)
    That is why completing the tests should be made mandatory.
    How do you expect this to be enforced? All patients and members of the public with mental capacity have the right to refuse any test or treatment they want (look at GMC and NMC guidance). You can't force people to do this no matter how stupid you think their decisions are. Aside from this the NHS cannot afford to waste money on millions of test kits when the vast majority of them are likely going to end up in the bin.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    How do you expect this to be enforced? All patients and members of the public with mental capacity have the right to refuse any test or treatment they want (look at GMC and NMC guidance). You can't force people to do this no matter how stupid you think their decisions are. Aside from this the NHS cannot afford to waste money on millions of test kits when the vast majority of them are likely going to end up in the bin.
    (Original post by CatusStarbright)
    I would disagree with making them mandatory. If people want to run the risk of having undetected bowel cancer then they are free to do so. The cost and time spent administrating such a mandatory scheme would also be a waste of NHS resources, in my opinion.
    Just feel the need to point out that isn’t part of the petition
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    (Original post by joecphillips)
    Just feel the need to point out that isn’t part of the petition
    It is actually, the petition states that it "calls on the government to change its bowel cancer screening scheme to start sending mandatory screening kits."
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    (Original post by CatusStarbright)
    It is actually, the petition states that it "calls on the government to change its bowel cancer screening scheme to start sending mandatory screening kits."
    Crap I missed that, I thought it was the different parts of the nhs having to send them not people take them
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    (Original post by CatusStarbright)
    I would disagree with making them mandatory. If people want to run the risk of having undetected bowel cancer then they are free to do so. The cost and time spent administrating such a mandatory scheme would also be a waste of NHS resources, in my opinion.
    (Original post by Glassapple)
    How do you expect this to be enforced? All patients and members of the public with mental capacity have the right to refuse any test or treatment they want (look at GMC and NMC guidance). You can't force people to do this no matter how stupid you think their decisions are. Aside from this the NHS cannot afford to waste money on millions of test kits when the vast majority of them are likely going to end up in the bin.
    There are a lot of low-manpower ways I can think of, for example, bar coding all tests to link up with NHS data to show which citizens have not submitted their results. The point about the cost is minor in this context because it is a large cost to prevent a bigger cost later, the cost of providing palliative care, cancer treatment for later stages, and all the other expenses of treating later-stage cancer patients is larger than sending out testing kits. A cost of a testing kit for a consumer is £3.50, if the NHS sent out a testing kit to all over-50s the total cost would be £74m to provide testing kits to the 21.3 million over-50s in the population, however, as the NHS would be buying bulk the cost of the kits would be below the rice for the consumer.
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    (Original post by Jacob E)
    There are a lot of low-manpower ways I can think of, for example, bar coding all tests to link up with NHS data to show which citizens have not submitted their results. The point about the cost is minor in this context because it is a large cost to prevent a bigger cost later, the cost of providing palliative care, cancer treatment for later stages, and all the other expenses of treating later-stage cancer patients is larger than sending out testing kits. A cost of a testing kit for a consumer is £3.50, if the NHS sent out a testing kit to all over-50s the total cost would be £74m to provide testing kits to the 21.3 million over-50s in the population, however, as the NHS would be buying bulk the cost of the kits would be below the rice for the consumer.
    You didn't address my point at all. Yes you could see who hadn't done the test, but you couldn't make them do it as everyone has a choice about whether they want to take any test or treatment. A punishment for not doing the tests would be completely unethical and would never make it past an ethics board. The tests could never be mandatory as forcing people to do them would be against their rights and there couldn't be any punishment for not doing them. You couldn't just say you were going to take away use of the NHS or raise taxes for people who didn't do the tests, I'm not sure what planet you're on.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    You didn't address my point at all. Yes you could see who hadn't done the test, but you couldn't make them do it as everyone has a choice about whether they want to take any test or treatment. A punishment for not doing the tests would be completely unethical and would never make it past an ethics board. The tests could never be mandatory as forcing people to do them would be against their rights and there couldn't be any punishment for not doing them. You couldn't just say you were going to take away use of the NHS or raise taxes for people who didn't do the tests, I'm not sure what planet you're on.
    Forcing individuals to submit stool samples could be managed using similar tactics to other compulsory charges or acts, for example, compulsory voting in Australia, filling in a census, or paying the television licence fee. The ethics argument raised is not a strong argument because ethics is subjective, the debate becomes deciding if liberty over conducting medial tests is more important than allowing large groups of the population to contribute towards their shortened lives by being diagnosed with bowel cancer in its later stages.
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    It would be expensive if the testing age is pulled earlier
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    (Original post by HateOCR)
    It would be expensive if the testing age is pulled earlier
    It would cost £74m to provide testing kits at an earlier age; a small amount when the whole NHS budget is thought of.
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    (Original post by Jacob E)
    It would cost £74m to provide testing kits at an earlier age; a small amount when the whole NHS budget is thought of.
    Unless funding is increased in real terms then i don’t think it should be available.
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    It’s definitely a nice idea, that would in the long term save us all in all money, given the fact that it is cheaper to identify bowel cancer earlier. I wouldn’t make it a mandatory test though, people should reserve the right to not take it should they wish
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    (Original post by Jacob E)
    It would cost £74m to provide testing kits at an earlier age; a small amount when the whole NHS budget is thought of.
    That's debatable. Say what you want but, £74 million is a lot of money and could be invested in a way that would benefit more people and a wider range of people. The NHS needs a lot of change, reform, and privatisation.

    Seriously, spending £74 million to force a large number of people to test themselves? What happened to freedom of choice? Campaigning for bowel cancer awareness is something I can agree should be done and encouraged and could be a suitable alternative to this, but if someone doesn't want to take time to get themselves checked, or simply doesn't care enough, that's their problem, not the government's.
 
 
 
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