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    Apparently it is often asked in medical interview why you want to be a doctor not a nurse,so I thought about ti and I came up with this answer: because I am interested in surgery and nurses cannot perform surgery.Is this answer right,or too vague or mean?If you were an interviewer what would you think of this answer??
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    Apparently it is often asked in medical interview why you want to be a doctor not a nurse,so I thought about ti and I came up with this answer: because I am interested in surgery and nurses cannot perform surgery.Is this answer right,or too vague or mean?If you were an interviewer what would you think of this answer??
    I am an interviewer and I would not be happy with this answer. What surgery are you interested in? What if you can't get into surgery? What about nurses who helps with surgical procedures? Nurses who perform endoscopies? It digs a hole for yourself.
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    I am an interviewer and I would not be happy with this answer. What surgery are you interested in? What if you can't get into surgery? What about nurses who helps with surgical procedures? Nurses who perform endoscopies? It digs a hole for yourself.
    Thank you for the feedback.Im going to try and answer this question again.Im interested in neurosurgery,plastics,general and cardiothoraic (maybe).If I cannot get into surgery maybe Ill do emergency medicine or cardiology or neurology or a different medical speciality,I know one thing and that is that I enjoy the hospital environment more then more clinic based environments like gps,but for all I know my mind could change.Doctors in surgery I think correct me if Im wrong,can lead the surgery,carry out diagnosis and decide what course of action is best and has more responsibility which I enjoy while nurses only assist.Also if I wasnt a surgeon,nurses cannot diagnose,even though nurses play an important role andhace a vital role,I like the fact doctors can have a plan of action and diagnose and lead the treatment and also they know more about different diseases I think,but I think nurses probably know a lot of stuff too.Im bad at answering this question,any other tips on things I should say or avoid saying would be appreaciates.What do you think makes a good answer?
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    Please try and break the paragraph down in the future. I will reply in chunks.

    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    Thank you for the feedback.Im going to try and answer this question again.Im interested in neurosurgery,plastics,general and cardiothoraic (maybe).

    Ok... Be prepared to be asked why you have such a wide range of interest. Are you literally going to reel off every single surgical specialty?

    If I cannot get into surgery maybe Ill do emergency medicine or cardiology or neurology or a different medical speciality,
    Ok, again why so many specialties? What about paediatrics for example?

    My point is I'm not trying to be difficult, but you will need to back it up with reasons why you wanted to do it.

    You shouldn't just say I want to do specialty 1, if not then specialty 2, or specialty 3. It just shows that you are not determined.

    I know one thing and that is that I enjoy the hospital environment more then more clinic based environments like gps,but for all I know my mind could change.
    That's ok. Good reason but remember things can change. In our medical school apparently 85% of graduates end up being GPs. I doubt that much entered medical school thinking that.

    Remember you will make your decision > 7 years into the future. Many things can and will change.

    Doctors in surgery I think correct me if Im wrong,can lead the surgery,carry out diagnosis and decide what course of action is best and has more responsibility which I enjoy while nurses only assist.
    That is very true. But why would you enjoy that (will be the question from the interviewers)?

    Also if I wasnt a surgeon,nurses cannot diagnose,even though nurses play an important role andhace a vital role,I like the fact doctors can have a plan of action and diagnose and lead the treatment and also they know more about different diseases I think,but I think nurses probably know a lot of stuff too.
    That's not strictly true. With advanced nurse practitioners they can diagnose (with the help with doctors). Some perform basic procedures and as I said including practical procedures like endoscopies.

    In many fields, specialist nurses know more than registrars (certainly) and even some consultants in the same field. It may be that they know a lot about one disease (e.g. diabetes) but not so much about others in the same specialty (e.g. thyroid diseases, in endocrine medicine).

    Im bad at answering this question,any other tips on things I should say or avoid saying would be appreaciates.What do you think makes a good answer?
    Yes, try and avoid saying you wanted to do many specialties. I would personally even avoid mention a specific specialty, unless you have an excellent reason for saying it. (e.g. you have a disease since childhood, have been looked after by paediatrics so wanted to contribute and train to be a paediatrician - very bland example)

    Feel free to ask more questions!
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    I don't quite know which speciality I like the best but I like aspects of the specialities I mentioned.I dont habe enough experience of different specialities yet to pin point to a few specific ones.Paediatrics would be difficult to work in for me as it is quite emotionally demanding,as dealing with children is quite difficult, and because I think I want to deal with a variety of age groups of patients,but I do t mind children but seeing only children is a bit difficult.

    Surgery- because I like how hands on it is, I dont just want to prescribe drugs and just say you need to go get this treatment done,even though that is important,I like surgery because it is hands on and you learn new surgival skills and there is always some new procedure.

    I dont know I cant explain why I like to make a diagnosis but if I tried it is because you put your knowledge into use and apply them to real world dituations and you use problem solving skills kind of e.g. This symptom could mean this or this disease or this drug could be the best one to use but on the downside it could cause this in a patient because eg. they have a history of heart problems..something along those lines.

    About the nurse thing I could say because doctors can try more complex surgeries and abigger variety then nurses..

    (Original post by ecolier)
    Please try and break the paragraph down in the future. I will reply in chunks.




    Ok... Be prepared to be asked why you have such a wide range of interest. Are you literally going to reel off every single surgical specialty?



    Ok, again why so many specialties? What about paediatrics for example?

    My point is I'm not trying to be difficult, but you will need to back it up with reasons why you wanted to do it.

    You shouldn't just say I want to do specialty 1, if not then specialty 2, or specialty 3. It just shows that you are not determined.



    That's ok. Good reason but remember things can change. In our medical school apparently 85% of graduates end up being GPs. I doubt that much entered medical school thinking that.

    Remember you will make your decision > 7 years into the future. Many things can and will change.



    That is very true. But why would you enjoy that (will be the question from the interviewers)?



    That's not strictly true. With advanced nurse practitioners they can diagnose (with the help with doctors). Some perform basic procedures and as I said including practical procedures like endoscopies.

    In many fields, specialist nurses know more than registrars (certainly) and even some consultants in the same field. It may be that they know a lot about one disease (e.g. diabetes) but not so much about others in the same specialty (e.g. thyroid diseases, in endocrine medicine).



    Yes, try and avoid saying you wanted to do many specialties. I would personally even avoid mention a specific specialty, unless you have an excellent reason for saying it. (e.g. you have a disease since childhood, have been looked after by paediatrics so wanted to contribute and train to be a paediatrician - very bland example)

    Feel free to ask more questions!
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    Thank you for the feedback.Im going to try and answer this question again.Im interested in neurosurgery,plastics,general and cardiothoraic (maybe).If I cannot get into surgery maybe Ill do emergency medicine or cardiology or neurology or a different medical speciality,I know one thing and that is that I enjoy the hospital environment more then more clinic based environments like gps,but for all I know my mind could change.Doctors in surgery I think correct me if Im wrong,can lead the surgery,carry out diagnosis and decide what course of action is best and has more responsibility which I enjoy while nurses only assist.Also if I wasnt a surgeon,nurses cannot diagnose,even though nurses play an important role andhace a vital role,I like the fact doctors can have a plan of action and diagnose and lead the treatment and also they know more about different diseases I think,but I think nurses probably know a lot of stuff too.Im bad at answering this question,any other tips on things I should say or avoid saying would be appreaciates.What do you think makes a good answer?
    Firstly I would steer clear of committing to particular (sub)specialties when you're an applicant. On what basis are you saying you prefer hospital to primary care? Or theatres to clinic? Surgeons also spend time in clinic, on the wards, in teaching, management etc. It's not necessary to draw lines and decide what you are and are not interested in before you've even started.

    It's also worth bearing in mind that nurses do not act in an assistant role. Surgical nurses, recovery nurses, scrub nurses etc are all performing their own role for which they are responsible - they are not assistants to the surgeons and surgeons don't have any managerial responsibility over them. A consultant surgeon's "assistant" is his or her juniors i.e. the registrar or senior house officer who is actually helping to perform the operation. I'm not saying this to be pedantic, but to try and get you to see that it's not a good idea to answer this question by talking in generalities i.e. "doctors are in charge and nurses assist".

    It's a difficult question to answer for sure - perhaps a good technique would be to think about what a typical doctor (i.e. not a consultant cardiothoracic surgeon) does that particularly appeals to you, compared to a typical nurse (i.e. not a nurse endoscopist). At the same time you could also acknowledge that both roles allow for lots of development and further training, but explain that overall what you've seen on your work experience (give examples) and read about makes medicine a more appealing choice for you as an individual. It may also be worth thinking about the differences in medical student and junior doctor education and training vs nurses, but again without making it sound like nurses can't get further training or education after their degrees, as this is not correct.

    At the end of the day the people who are interviewing you are doctors, so obviously they have made the choice to go into medicine instead of nursing. They're not looking to catch you out, they just want to see that you're not thinking about healthcare in terms of generalities or stereotypes.
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    I don't quite know which speciality I like the best but I like aspects of the specialities I mentioned.I dont habe enough experience of different specialities yet to pin point to a few specific ones.Paediatrics would be difficult to work in for me as it is quite emotionally demanding,as dealing with children is quite difficult, and because I think I want to deal with a variety of age groups of patients,but I do t mind children but seeing only children is a bit difficult.
    That's your reasons and that's ok! Surgical specialties are very emotionally demanding too, you must remember. Some surgical specialties are predominantly (you do see the rare other gender occasionally) one gender e.g. obstetrics and gynaecology, breast surgery, (a lot of men but definitely some women in) urology.

    Surgery- because I like how hands on it is, I dont just want to prescribe drugs and just say you need to go get this treatment done,even though that is important,I like surgery because it is hands on and you learn new surgival skills and there is always some new procedure.
    Ok in that case you definitely need to do more work experience. There are lots of non-surgical specialties that require hands on experience. For example clinical radiology is very hands on, same as cardiology (which you have mentioned), but also specialties like gastroenterology, respiratory etc. etc.

    Remember if you say that you think surgery is the only way you can get hands on, that shows a lack of understanding. Which is the reason why I would advise you to not go into specific specialties unless you know it very well. Otherwise you will be digging yourself a hole.

    I dont know I cant explain why I like to make a diagnosis but if I tried it is because you put your knowledge into use and apply them to real world dituations and you use problem solving skills kind of e.g. This symptom could mean this or this disease or this drug could be the best one to use but on the downside it could cause this in a patient because eg. they have a history of heart problems..something along those lines.
    Well surgical doctors make (usually) less diagnoses than medical doctors. This is not trying to demean surgical doctors but they generally have less time to probe deeply the history and examination. Surgical specialties tend to see more acutely unwell patients, who needs treatment there and then.

    If you want to hone your problem solving skills, our specialty (neurology) is an excellent choice.

    About the nurse thing I could say because doctors can try more complex surgeries and abigger variety then nurses..
    Nurses have a lot of variety too. What about community / district nurses, practice nurses (in GP / hospitals), ward nurses, advanced practitioners, specialist nurses... And you are still fixating on the fact that you will get into surgery, and be doing "complex surgeries" too? What does that even mean?

    (Original post by Democracy)
    ....
    Good answer!
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    Thank you for addressing my misconceptions.I made this decision on the basis that I never like going to the GP myself and dont like the environment feel and after volunteeri g at a care home for quite a while now I dont particularly enjoy community medicine but when I did work experience I very much enjoyed the environment and going on ward rounds and all the otger things I experienced.

    I didnt mind clinics when I was on hospital work experience but I wouldnt only want to do clinics.In the hospital the fact there were ward rounds I liked how the doctor built a relationship with the patient as they reviewed them everyday for sone time and you could see the patient progressing and improving on some occassions.

    What I liked about the doctor role is the dotor dealt with more patients whilst the nurse only built a relationship with a handful of patients at a time.I liked how the doctor planned out the course of action for treatment and analysed the results,but Im not sure maybe nurses do that too?Do doctors have a more in depth medical knowledge or is it about the same would you say?


    (Original post by Democracy)
    Firstly I would steer clear of committing to particular (sub)specialties when you're an applicant. On what basis are you saying you prefer hospital to primary care? Or theatres to clinic? Surgeons also spend time in clinic, on the wards, in teaching, management etc. It's not necessary to draw lines and decide what you are and are not interested in before you've even started.

    It's also worth bearing in mind that nurses do not act in an assistant role. Surgical nurses, recovery nurses, scrub nurses etc are all performing their own role for which they are responsible - they are not assistants to the surgeons and surgeons don't have any managerial responsibility over them. A consultant surgeon's "assistant" is his or her juniors i.e. the registrar or senior house officer who is actually helping with the operation. I'm not saying this to be pedantic, but to try and get you to see that it's not a good idea to answer this question by talking in generalities i.e. "doctors are in charge and nurses assist".

    It's a difficult question to answer for sure - perhaps a good technique would be to think about what a typical doctor (i.e. not a consultant cardiothoracic surgeon) does that particularly appeals to you, compared to a typical nurse (i.e. not a nurse endoscopist). At the same time you could also acknowledge that both roles allow for lots of development and further training, but explain that overall what you've seen on your work experience (give examples) and read about makes medicine a more appealing choice for you as an individual. It may also be worth thinking about the differences in medical student and junior doctor education and training vs nurses, but again without making it sound like nurses can't get further training or education after their degrees, as this is not correct.

    At the end of the day the people who are interviewing you are doctors, so obviously they have made the choice to go into medicine instead of nursing. They're not looking to catch you out, they just want to see that you're not thinking about healthcare in terms of generalities or stereotypes.
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    Thank you for addressing my misconceptions.I made this decision on the basis that I never like going to the GP myself and dont like the environment feel and after volunteeri g at a care home for quite a while now I dont particularly enjoy community medicine but when I did work experience I very much enjoyed the environment and going on ward rounds and all the otger things I experienced.

    I didnt mind clinics when I was on hospital work experience but I wouldnt only want to do clinics.In the hospital the fact there were ward rounds I liked how the doctor built a relationship with the patient as they reviewed them everyday for sone time and you could see the patient progressing and improving on some occassions.

    What I liked about the doctor role is the dotor dealt with more patients whilst the nurse only built a relationship with a handful of patients at a time.I liked how the doctor planned out the course of action for treatment and analysed the results,but Im not sure maybe nurses do that too?Do doctors have a more in depth medical knowledge or is it about the same would you say?
    Based on the kinds of questions you're asking, you need to do A LOT more research and get a lot more experience before you can possibly know whether being a doctor - or even working in health care (and what role you want to fulfil) - is right for you.
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    Im sorry if I have misconceptions about medicine,I still have a lot to learn..Im open minded to other specialities but lets just say you're doing your foundation year and surgery is the thing you enjoyed most you can potentially go into it,if you're a nurse you can also work in surgery but perhaps are not able to do some of the things a surgeon can.Im open minded when it comes to picking a speciality.
    I thought radiology was just looking at medical images and making diagnosis..I know they also help with coiling aneurysms but dont know what other hands on things they do.Good advice,I know aneasthesia is also hands on.Do you think a and e is very hands on?Thank you for your useful advice.Im sorry Im not too informed on nurses and the variety of roles they have,thank you for your information.Im not 100% sure about surgery but it is a speciality that sounds appealing at the moment especially after reading Henry Marsh's book.Complex surgery- Those long experimental surgeries that require lots of experience to do well and skills.Some surgeries are easier then others e.g. Removing an ingrown toe nail vs clipping an aneurysm..

    (Original post by ecolier)
    That's your reasons and that's ok! Surgical specialties are very emotionally demanding too, you must remember. Some surgical specialties are predominantly (you do see the rare other gender occasionally) one gender e.g. obstetrics and gynaecology, breast surgery, (a lot of men but definitely some women in) urology.



    Ok in that case you definitely need to do more work experience. There are lots of non-surgical specialties that require hands on experience. For example clinical radiology is very hands on, same as cardiology (which you have mentioned), but also specialties like gastroenterology, respiratory etc. etc.

    Remember if you say that you think surgery is the only way you can get hands on, that shows a lack of understanding. Which is the reason why I would advise you to not go into specific specialties unless you know it very well. Otherwise you will be digging yourself a hole.



    Well surgical doctors make (usually) less diagnoses than medical doctors. This is not trying to demean surgical doctors but they generally have less time to probe deeply the history and examination. Surgical specialties tend to see more acutely unwell patients, who needs treatment there and then.

    If you want to hone your problem solving skills, our specialty (neurology) is an excellent choice.



    Nurses have a lot of variety too. What about community / district nurses, practice nurses (in GP / hospitals), ward nurses, advanced practitioners, specialist nurses... And you are still fixating on the fact that you will get into surgery, and be doing "complex surgeries" too? What does that even mean?



    Good answer!
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    (Original post by Hype en Ecosse)
    Based on the kinds of questions you're asking, you need to do A LOT more research and get a lot more experience before you can possibly know whether being a doctor - or even working in health care (and what role you want to fulfil) - is right for you.
    Even though I dont know a lot of things,I try to do as much research as possible.I know a lot more about being a doctor then nurse,it would kind of make sense if you're interested in medicine to know more about one then another.Im in the process of getting work experience in surgery,hopefully if paperwork and stuff works out.
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    Im sorry if I have misconceptions about medicine,I still have a lot to learn..Im open minded to other specialities but lets just say you're doing your foundation year and surgery is the thing you enjoyed most you can potentially go into it,if you're a nurse you can also work in surgery but perhaps are not able to do some of the things a surgeon can.Im open minded when it comes to picking a speciality.
    Ahh but a junior nurse can set his / her heart on becoming becoming a nurse practitioner, for example. But I get what you mean - still it may be too late to prepare your portfolio for a surgical application if you start in Foundation training! (Many medical students now do audits / presentations etc.)

    I thought radiology was just looking at medical images and making diagnosis..I know they also help with coiling aneurysms but dont know what other hands on things they do.
    Doctors training in the subspecialty of interventional radiology do a lot of hands on things. Obviously radiologists in other fields do look at images and diagnose.

    Good advice,I know aneasthesia is also hands on.Do you think a and e is very hands on?
    Yes, it can be. There are lots of emergency procedures that needs doing in ED such as stitching, inserting chest drains etc.

    ...Some surgeries are easier then others e.g. Removing an ingrown toe nail vs clipping an aneurysm..
    As the other posters have said above, you will definitely need more experience.
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    Good answer!
    Thanks

    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    Thank you for addressing my misconceptions.I made this decision on the basis that I never like going to the GP myself and dont like the environment feel and after volunteeri g at a care home for quite a while now I dont particularly enjoy community medicine but when I did work experience I very much enjoyed the environment and going on ward rounds and all the otger things I experienced.

    I didnt mind clinics when I was on hospital work experience but I wouldnt only want to do clinics.In the hospital the fact there were ward rounds I liked how the doctor built a relationship with the patient as they reviewed them everyday for sone time and you could see the patient progressing and improving on some occassions.
    Look, I don't plan on going into GP either so I'm certainly not here to recruit anyone into general practice (or any other specialty :p:). All I'm saying is that until you've actually worked in an environment and carried the responsibility which goes with it, you can't realistically claim to like or dislike it.

    It's a good thing to have interests and ambitions early on, and perhaps you really would make an excellent hospital physician one day - I'm just saying it's good to keep an open mind and not pigeonhole yourself early on. Working in the hospital environment is very different to studying in it as a med student or doing work experience in it, which is one reason why a lot of medical students who are set on hospital specialties start work and decide actually they are far happier and more successful in the community (which doesn't necessarily mean GP by the way).

    We've all seen it before, so we're just trying to help you understand so you don't come off as yet another naive applicant in your interview.

    What I liked about the doctor role is the dotor dealt with more patients whilst the nurse only built a relationship with a handful of patients at a time.I liked how the doctor planned out the course of action for treatment and analysed the results,but Im not sure maybe nurses do that too?Do doctors have a more in depth medical knowledge or is it about the same would you say?
    It's not the same. We do learn a lot more about medical science and clinical medicine than nurses do. But that's because they're busy learning nursing (something I have next to no academic or practical knowledge of).

    The interviewers just want to see that you're answering the question based on evidence which goes beyond TV tropes of doctors and nurses i.e.:

    "Doctors are in charge" - yes, of other doctors (to an extent) - not anyone else.

    "Doctors know more" - yes, our university education and postgraduate education is longer and more in depth than a nursing degree, so we do know more about clinical medicine, but this is self-evident. You're basically stating the obvious by saying that doctors know more about doctoring than a non-doctor. But that's not to say that a nurse can't gain further education or knowledge in his or her chosen field.

    You're not incorrect in what you're saying, it's more the technique of presenting it at the interview so it doesn't come off as very black and white "doctors are x and nurses are y". Just keep bringing it back to what you saw on your work experience and why that appeals to you as an individual, whilst stating that you're aware that both roles allow for lots of further education.
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    Thanks


    Look, I don't plan on going into GP either so I'm certainly not here to recruit anyone into general practice (or any other specialty :p:). All I'm saying is that until you've actually worked in an environment and carried the responsibility which goes with it, you can't realistically claim to like or dislike it.

    It's a good thing to have interests and ambitions early on, and perhaps you really would make an excellent hospital physician one day - I'm just saying it's good to keep an open mind and not pigeonhole yourself early on. Working in the hospital environment is very different to studying in it as a med student or doing work experience in it, which is one reason why a lot of medical students who are set on hospital specialties start work and decide actually they are far happier and more successful in the community (which doesn't necessarily mean GP by the way).

    We've all seen it before, so we're just trying to help you understand so you don't come off as yet another naive applicant in your interview.



    It's not the same. We do learn a lot more about medical science and clinical medicine than nurses do. But that's because they're busy learning nursing (something I have next to no academic or practical knowledge of).

    The interviewers just want to see that you're answering the question based on evidence which goes beyond TV tropes of doctors and nurses i.e.:

    "Doctors are in charge" - yes, of other doctors (to an extent) - not anyone else.

    "Doctors know more" - yes, our university education and postgraduate education is longer and more in depth than a nursing degree, so we do know more about clinical medicine, but this is self-evident. You're basically stating the obvious by saying that doctors know more about doctoring than a non-doctor. But that's not to say that a nurse can't gain further education or knowledge in his or her chosen field.

    You're not incorrect in what you're saying, it's more the technique of presenting it at the interview so it doesn't come off as very black and white "doctors are x and nurses are y". Just keep bringing it back to what you saw on your work experience and why that appeals to you as an individual, whilst stating that you're aware that both roles allow for lots of further education.
    Out of interest what speciality are you thinking of choosing?

    Thank you for your help,it is quite eye opening.




    I think my problem is,I cannot articulate my thoughts well and keep digging holes for myself,I agree ,I need to present my arguments better.
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    Out of interest what speciality are you thinking of choosing?

    Thank you for your help,it is quite eye opening.
    Nothing ward based Ward work is terrible (something I didn't know as an applicant :awesome:)


    I think my problem is,I cannot articulate my thoughts well and keep digging holes for myself,I agree ,I need to present my arguments better.
    It's fine, the interviewers aren't expecting you to know everything - they just want to see that you're open minded and that you've thought about things from several different angles. Try and think about the motivations behind the question i.e. what are they really asking about and trying to uncover.
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    In the hospital the fact there were ward rounds I liked how the doctor built a relationship with the patient as they reviewed them everyday for sone time and you could see the patient progressing and improving on some occassions.

    What I liked about the doctor role is the dotor dealt with more patients whilst the nurse only built a relationship with a handful of patients at a time.
    What you describe makes no sense. GPs built a relationship with patients as they see them for years and they can watch their patients getting sick and subsequently better over the course of their careers. GPs often care for generations of families building a really unique relationship that most hospital doctors can only dream of. Of course you can have Mr Smith come to your heart failure clinic for years and then you get to build some relationship as well, but your heart failure specialist nurse will know Mr Smith much better than you.

    When it comes to the wards, I am not sure if you noticed that doctors often rely on nurses for information about their patients as it's the nurses who spend the whole day with them and know about their symptoms and their needs. Doctors come for 10-20 mins (depending on how complex the case is), review, make a plan and then only ever intervene when something happens. Once you get past foundation and SHO level, you will be seeing the patients even less as you will be most likely only called to do urgent reviews.

    At your stage it is perfectly reasonable to not know everything about medicine, but you need to avoid trying to throwing random specialities in and belittling nurses job. It is very likely that you will have a senior sitting on your interview panel and telling her that her job is limited to assisting doctors in surgeries may piss her off.

    I think the best approach to nail medical school interview is to avoid any specific details when it comes to questions like these. Unless you are certain you know very well what a nurse does or you have an extremely good reason to want to do particular speciality, don't mention any of that. Keep it generic.
    On my interview I got asked why medicine and not law if I am basically good in both sciences and humanities and my answer was simply 'because I like sciences better'.
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    My experience going to GPs is completely different,every time I go there is a different person!I never been to the same doctor twice and I go to the same surgery every time and it's not like it's big or anything.So I never built any relationship with any GP.So experience is completely different from what you're saying.

    When I was in work experience the doctor mostly relied on notes, and talked a bit to the nurse.

    I never belittled nurses!I think you're misinterpreting what I am saying.I was just a bit confused on the roles of a doctor compared to a nurse.Me saying that doctors have more responsibility in some ways and being to diagnose (though I know found out nurses can also diagnose sometimes) is not belittling them.I never had surgery work experience so I wasnt quite sure what kind of things they do in surgery,even though I have a placement planned in april,you cant be angry at people if they're unintentionally making a misjudgement if they're uniformed.

    I agree though I shouldn't give too much detail.But then if you want your answers to stand out from the other interviews,you don't want you're answers to be like the typical answers people give.Maybe fi you give like a unique answer the interview can remember you more, and think this person done their research or understand the career more,I dont know,if they would or would not?

    (Original post by Nottie)
    What you describe makes no sense. GPs built a relationship with patients as they see them for years and they can watch their patients getting sick and subsequently better over the course of their careers. GPs often care for generations of families building a really unique relationship that most hospital doctors can only dream of. Of course you can have Mr Smith come to your heart failure clinic for years and then you get to build some relationship as well, but your heart failure specialist nurse will know Mr Smith much better than you.

    When it comes to the wards, I am not sure if you noticed that doctors often rely on nurses for information about their patients as it's the nurses who spend the whole day with them and know about their symptoms and their needs. Doctors come for 10-20 mins (depending on how complex the case is), review, make a plan and then only ever intervene when something happens. Once you get past foundation and SHO level, you will be seeing the patients even less as you will be most likely only called to do urgent reviews.

    At your stage it is perfectly reasonable to not know everything about medicine, but you need to avoid trying to throwing random specialities in and belittling nurses job. It is very likely that you will have a senior sitting on your interview panel and telling her that her job is limited to assisting doctors in surgeries may piss her off.

    I think the best approach to nail medical school interview is to avoid any specific details when it comes to questions like these. Unless you are certain you know very well what a nurse does or you have an extremely good reason to want to do particular speciality, don't mention any of that. Keep it generic.
    On my interview I got asked why medicine and not law if I am basically good in both sciences and humanities and my answer was simply 'because I like sciences better'.
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    ...But then if you want your answers to stand out from the other interviews,you don't want you're answers to be like the typical answers people give.
    I will let other people / Nottie reply to the earlier parts of your last post, and I will reply to this bit.

    You do not want to stand out in the interviews. Remember medical schools give hundreds of offers, not one or two. If you are making your memorable it will not be a good thing. You want to be a stereotypical good candidate, and that's what matters.

    Maybe fi you give like a unique answer the interview can remember you more, and think this person done their research or understand the career more,I dont know,if they would or would not?
    Only if they have actually done research and know what they are talking about! No offence, but so far what you have said showed you have very little insight into things.

    It is unlikely that a work experience lasting several days / weeks will change this. So if I were you, I would prepare generic answers to "Why Medicine?" "Why this medical school?" rather than "Reasons I want to do neurosurgery / cardiothoracic surgery etc. etc."

    Remember you are not trying to stand out. You want to be a stereotypical good Year 13 prospective medical student.

    *Just to let you know (for my medical school anyway) the scores are immediately jotted down as you are being interviewed, we do not sit down at the end of the day and rate everyone. There is really no advantage to make yourself memorable.
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    I will let other people / Nottie reply to the earlier parts of your last post, and I will reply to this bit.

    You do not want to stand out in the interviews. Remember medical schools give hundreds of offers, not one or two. If you are making your memorable it will not be a good thing. You want to be a stereotypical good candidate, adn that's what matters.



    Only if they have actually done research and know what they are talking about! No offence, but so far what you have said showed you have very little insight into things.

    It is unlikely that a work experience lasting several days / weeks will change this. So if I were you, I would prepare generic answers to "Why Medicine?" "Why this medical school?" rather than "Reasons I want to do neurosurgery / cardiothoracic surgery etc. etc."

    Remember you are not trying to stand out. You want to be a stereotypical good Year 13 prospective medical student.
    I never been to an interview....I thought it was good if you give like unique answers and stuff,I mean they always tell you don't say I want to be a doctor because I want to help people or because I like science and people?So I was under the impression generic answers are bad?I don't know as much as other people,you are right,but then I don't know any doctors really and don't have much experience in medicine,especially nursing which Im completely clueless on.So it's not a good idea to show the interviewer you're knowledgeable and I should just keep it basic?
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    I never been to an interview....I thought it was good if you give like unique answers and stuff,I mean they always tell you don't say I want to be a doctor because I want to help people or because I like science and people?So I was under the impression generic answers are bad?
    Yes, but no one gave generic answers like that for the interviews I did. You have to have an answer that is unique to you (note: not to the interviewers), surely there is a reason you wanted to do medicine that is not "I want to help people". What's your reason?

    I don't know as much as other people,you are right,but then I don't know any doctors really and don't have much experience in medicine,especially nursing which Im completely clueless on.
    So was I. There were no doctors / nurses in my family whatsoever when I applied. I literally went on a 3 days hospital experience course, and volunteered in a ward for a few months and that was it when I went for my interview!

    So it's not a good idea to show the interviewer you're knowledgeable and I should just keep it basic?
    Only if you are knowledgeable. If you are not, and I doubt many of your peers will be - keep it basic!

    I can tell you all about the different specialties, but then (1) you will probably forget (2) it makes no difference because you may not be asked it at interviews (3) they are looking for individual thinking, not regurgitation.
 
 
 
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