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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    I have a reason,but it's kind of cheesy (please don't judge) but here it goes I first kind of realised I was interested in medicine after watching this documentary on channel 4( I know tv is nothing like real world..) It had this surgeon called David Nott in it and he went to volunteer in Syria in Aleppo and was doing humanitarian work and seeing his humanitarian work and how much impact he had on the patients that had extremely bad injured especially children after having barrel bombs dropped on them and were injured by the blast and shrapnel and seeing how he put his own life at risk to be there to provide life saving treatment (this was when the Syrian civil war was happening,well it is still happening),his selflessness and desire to help others inspired me a lot.I want to do humanitarian work as a doctor,just like that doctor,I knwo that sounds very outlandish and naive but this really inspired me.There were people with completely hopeless injuries and he worked tirelessly and with the best of his ability to help them,working 18 hours he said per day.What makes me want to do medicine is the big impact is has on people, and how it can improve peoples quality of life,
    So far so good. Leave out the "I got wind of this from the telly" bit and you'd be ok!

    you can teachers help and improve quality of life but then without healthcare there is no life and you won't benefit from a teacher?
    Leave out this bit. Again you are digging yourself a hole. A doctor is a teacher.

    I like how medicine is always changing,always new techniques,medicines,new procedures,new treatment and you are always learning something new, it is a field that is always advancing.I knwo other jobs do too but I have a keen interest in medical related things.
    This is good - it certainly needs refining but you have a good foundation to the "Why Medicine" answer.

    I don't knwo if this is a good answer, or will the interviewer not take me seriously.
    If you are at the interview, why not? It's hard enough to get an interview. Everyone who were there earned their right to be there.

    Also after doing work experience in haematology,when I saw a young patient going into remission after having lymphoma and talking to the patient and the gratefulness for the doctors hard work and how uplifted their mood was,it made me feel like being a medicine would be a rewarding job well not always,there is more to this story and specific details which made me want to do medicine I don't really want to say due to patient confidentiality.
    Another good example. It's ok if you don't want to say it here, but unless the disease occurs one in a million it is unlikely the patient will be identified.

    Ill be interested to learn more about different specialities , I would be all ears!I do not really care if they asked me about the interview,because it would help enlighten me more about medicine and it would help me dispel my misconceptions,which would be beneficial in the long term,but you're probably very busy.
    No, but there is so much information on here (Current Medical Students / Doctors section of TSR) or generic information easily searchable on Google that I don't want to repeat myself.

    https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/EXP.../ROLES-DOCTORS is a good start, and feel free to ask here or PM me if you have any more questions!
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    So if they ask em where I got this from what do I say if I shouldn't say I got it from tv?Their story is quite a good one, the patient I mentioned,very emotive so I think they could be identified.
    (Original post by ecolier)
    So far so good. Leave out the "I got wind of this from the telly" bit and you'd be ok!



    Leave out this bit. Again you are digging yourself a hole. A doctor is a teacher.



    This is good - it certainly needs refining but you have a good foundation to the "Why Medicine" answer.



    If you are at the interview, why not? It's hard enough to get an interview. Everyone who were there earned their right to be there.



    Another good example. It's ok if you don't want to say it here, but unless the disease occurs one in a million it is unlikely the patient will be identified.



    No, but there is so much information on here (Current Medical Students / Doctors section of TSR) or generic information easily searchable on Google that I don't want to repeat myself.

    https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/EXP.../ROLES-DOCTORS is a good start, and feel free to ask here or PM me if you have any more questions!
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    So if they ask em where I got this from what do I say if I shouldn't say I got it from tv?Their story is quite a good one, the patient I mentioned,very emotive so I think they could be identified.
    Surely there are other ways that you could have heard about him:
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/wo...-a6831646.html being one. You can mention telly though, as long as you then backed up by saying what you have researched about his work.
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    Surely there are other ways that you could have heard about him:
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/wo...-a6831646.html being one. You can mention telly though, as long as you then backed up by saying what you have researched about his work.
    So I will say, I heard about the humanitarian work of David Nott after reading an article about him on the internet and I saw their was a documentary about his work which I watched that inspired me even more to want to become a doctor,something along those lines.
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    So I will say, I heard about the humanitarian work of David Nott after reading an article about him on the internet and I saw their was a documentary about his work which I watched that inspired me even more to want to become a doctor,something along those lines.
    When is your interview? Are you aiming for 2018 entry?
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    Only if you are knowledgeable. If you are not, and I doubt many of your peers will be - keep it basic!

    I can tell you all about the different specialties, but then (1) you will probably forget (2) it makes no difference because you may not be asked it at interviews (3) they are looking for individual thinking, not regurgitation.
    I’m just someone who is reading this thread to inform myself as I am a medicine applicant this year. I wanted to say thank you very much for your advice - I think you are making some very good and valid points here, particularly the one about about not “standing out” but simply looking good. Incredibly useful indeed.
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    When is your interview? Are you aiming for 2018 entry?
    Applying in 2018 for 2019 entry.I know I still have some time but there is no harm in doing a little prep work.And this why nurse question has been on my mind for a year now or so.
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    (Original post by nylrehs)
    I’m just someone who is reading this thread to inform myself as I am a medicine applicant this year. I wanted to say thank you very much for your advice - I think you are making some very good and valid points here, particularly the one about about not “standing out” but simply looking good. Incredibly useful indeed.
    No problem. Feel free to ask any questions yourself! (Maybe create a new thread or PM me!)

    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    Applying in 2018 for 2019 entry.I know I still have some time but there is no harm in doing a little prep work.And this why nurse question has been on my mind for a year now or so.
    None at all. There's nothing to lose. Feel free to ask any more questions after your work experience (you will have plenty - I did!)
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    No problem. Feel free to ask any questions yourself! (Maybe create a new thread or PM me!)



    None at all. There's nothing to lose. Feel free to ask any more questions after your work experience (you will have plenty - I did!)
    A doctor who came to our school showed us this,it's quite funny you probably seen it: http://scutmonkeycomics.blogspot.co....ypes-2011.html

    I know these are all just stereotypes and are not true,but do you relate to anything in this comic or not on your journey in medicine?
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    A doctor who came to our school showed us this,it's quite funny you probably seen it: http://scutmonkeycomics.blogspot.co....ypes-2011.html

    I know these are all just stereotypes and are not true,but do you relate to anything in this comic or not on your journey in medicine?
    Yes, the neurology one is certainly true. However there is now something / more things we can do about many things.

    In strokes we now do thrombolysis (we + stroke doctors) and thrombectomies (radiologists), which can potentially improve (some) patient's quality of life. There are also more drugs for MS (multiple sclerosis). We await the first drugs for dementia - that's going to be big for neurology.

    However, by and large the old neurology slogan "if steroids doesn't work, give more steroids" still holds true for many things :rofl:

    But that's not any more false that the dermatology slogan "if it's dry, wet it; if it's wet, dry it" :rofl3:

    PS: both us and dermatology have good work lifestyles :shh:
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    Yes, the neurology one is certainly true. However there is now something / more things we can do about many things.

    In strokes we now do thrombolysis (we + stroke doctors) and thrombectomies (radiologists), which can potentially improve (some) patient's quality of life. There are also more drugs for MS (multiple sclerosis). We await the first drugs for dementia - that's going to be big for neurology.

    However, by and large the old neurology slogan "if steroids doesn't work, give more steroids" still holds true for many things :rofl:

    But that's not any more false that the dermatology slogan "if it's dry, wet it; if it's wet, dry it" :rofl3:

    PS: both us and dermatology have good work lifestyles :shh:
    Do neurologists in busy London hospitals also have good working hours or does it depend if you work for a small or big hospital and the location?The registrar on my work experience which was in a district hospital and the less busy ones said her working hours were a lot better in the district hospital then when she was in this other huge London city one (I dont want to mention names).Do neurologists do many procedures or do you just prescribe drugs,diagnose and just decide which tests a patient should get,if you do any procedures what are they?Im just wondering what has your experience with surgeons been like,when I was reading on tsr a lot of people seemed to not like surgery because they found the surgeons rude and arrogant and intimidating,this was even mentioned in a book when I was reading adventures in anaesthesia by the anaesthetist.Is this the case often in surgery or not?
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    I don't think OP sounds uninformed. He/she's been given some excellent constructive advice in this thread.

    It's easy to pick holes in anyone's answers to interview questions if you set out with that aim. I feel comments that OP "needs to do more work experience" are perhaps slightly unfair, bearing in mind he's an applicant.
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    Do neurologists in busy London hospitals also have good working hours or does it depend if you work for a small or big hospital and the location?
    Nope. It is just the way of the specialty. Our on-calls are non-resident for nights, and only weekends (usually at least 1 in 5 weekends) require you to be there at the hospital. Normal working day is 9-5 Mon-Fri.

    I know this because I have friends working at Queens Square (or formally known as The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery).

    The registrar on my work experience which was in a district hospital and the less busy ones said her working hours were a lot better in the district hospital then when she was in this other huge London city one (I dont want to mention names).
    It will be only slightly different. The workload remains similar. There will be more doctors at more busy hospitals so it compensates it that way.

    Do neurologists do many procedures or do you just prescribe drugs,diagnose and just decide which tests a patient should get,if you do any procedures what are they?
    We don't do many procedures. At a push we do lumbar punctures and botulinum toxin (Botox?) injections. Some neurologists may do neurophysiology investigations like nerve conduction studies, electroencephalogram (EEG = brain tracing) etc. but that's mainly done by neurophysiologists.

    This actually explains why we are not called out often. If we do procedure we would have been much more on-call dependent (e.g. like cardiology).

    Im just wondering what has your experience with surgeons been like,when I was reading on tsr a lot of people seemed to not like surgery because they found the surgeons rude and arrogant and intimidating,
    I did want to do surgery, to the extend that I did a surgical post-graduate exam! I loved my bosses when I did orthopaedics as an FY1. But then I am a boy so was involved in the banter. Plus this was a few years ago so things may well be different.

    this was even mentioned in a book when I was reading adventures in anaesthesia by the anaesthetist.Is this the case often in surgery or not?
    Depends on (1) hospital (2) firm of surgery (3) individual surgeons - so definitely your mileage may vary.
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    Nope. It is just the way of the specialty. Our on-calls are non-resident for nights, and only weekends (usually at least 1 in 5 weekends) require you to be there at the hospital. Normal working day is 9-5 Mon-Fri.

    I know this because I have friends working at Queens Square (or formally known as The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery).



    It will be only slightly different. The workload remains similar. There will be more doctors at more busy hospitals so it compensates it that way.



    We don't do many procedures. At a push we do lumbar punctures and botulinum toxin (Botox?) injections. Some neurologists may do neurophysiology investigations like nerve conduction studies, electroencephalogram (EEG = brain tracing) etc. but that's mainly done by neurophysiologists.

    This actually explains why we are not called out often. If we do procedure we would have been much more on-call dependent (e.g. like cardiology).



    I did want to do surgery, to the extend that I did a surgical post-graduate exam! I loved my bosses when I did orthopaedics as an FY1. But then I am a boy so was involved in the banter. Plus this was a few years ago so things may well be different.



    Depends on (1) hospital (2) firm of surgery (3) individual surgeons - so definitely your mileage may vary.
    Thank you.I shall PM you more often.
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    Nope. It is just the way of the specialty. Our on-calls are non-resident for nights, and only weekends (usually at least 1 in 5 weekends) require you to be there at the hospital. Normal working day is 9-5 Mon-Fri.

    I know this because I have friends working at Queens Square (or formally known as The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery).



    It will be only slightly different. The workload remains similar. There will be more doctors at more busy hospitals so it compensates it that way.



    We don't do many procedures. At a push we do lumbar punctures and botulinum toxin (Botox?) injections. Some neurologists may do neurophysiology investigations like nerve conduction studies, electroencephalogram (EEG = brain tracing) etc. but that's mainly done by neurophysiologists.

    This actually explains why we are not called out often. If we do procedure we would have been much more on-call dependent (e.g. like cardiology).



    I did want to do surgery, to the extend that I did a surgical post-graduate exam! I loved my bosses when I did orthopaedics as an FY1. But then I am a boy so was involved in the banter. Plus this was a few years ago so things may well be different.



    Depends on (1) hospital (2) firm of surgery (3) individual surgeons - so definitely your mileage may vary.
    Just a quick question, I know you said that it isn't a good idea to mention a specialty in your answers but I'm applying to UCL because they offer Paediatric Care or Neuroscience as the intercalated degree. I'm keen to work in paediatrics or neurology/neurosurgery so this degree of flexibility was why I applied there (along with the fact that GOSH is one of their teaching/partner hospitals). Should I mention this when asked why I chose their course?
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    (Original post by JennLousie)
    Just a quick question, I know you said that it isn't a good idea to mention a specialty in your answers but I'm applying to UCL because they offer Paediatric Care or Neuroscience as the intercalated degree. I'm keen to work in paediatrics or neurology/neurosurgery so this degree of flexibility was why I applied there (along with the fact that GOSH is one of their teaching/partner hospitals). Should I mention this when asked why I chose their course?
    Yes! If it shows in any way that you have researched (especially useful for "Why our medical school" ) then please do. When I applied to Leicester I specifically said "Because Glenfield is one of the famous heart centres" and they loved it.
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    OP I think you have demonstrated in this thread that you seem to be generally very well aware of what medicine entails including the question of medicine vs nursing, for an applicant, as suggested recently above.

    My only suggestions are that you are able to put across your answers to standard questions like these more succinctly. You've written a lot of text above, but in an interview you may be the 10000th applicant they've seen and you'll want to be a bit more succinct. This can easily be done in pre-interview preparation in your own time.

    Also, it's great that you want to do surgery, but for interview purposes I would put that to one side (unless specifically asked) or just add it onto the end of why you're interested in medicine. Reason being is that some interviewers may perceive it as being a bit close-minded as such an early stage. It's better to say that you've found ALL aspects of medicine that you've encountered so far interesting, but especially your surgical exposure. Just don't rule anything out!

    Also, have a search for interview books for medicine. They can certainly help.
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    Yes! If it shows in any way that you have researched (especially useful for "Why our medical school" ) then please do. When I applied to Leicester I specifically said "Because Glenfield is one of the famous heart centres" and they loved it.
    Just checking! It's my first choice so I'm desperate not to ruin my interview on Wednesday!
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    (Original post by Someone123123)
    ...Also, it's great that you want to do surgery, but for interview purposes I would put that to one side (unless specifically asked) or just add it onto the end of why you're interested in medicine...
    Agreed! If anyone comes to the interview tell me they want to do X specialty, I assume that they want to talk about it and will ask "Why" and "What does it involve". If it is not followed up properly it just shows a lack of insight. Therefore = hole digging unless you are 100% certain of what you are saying (or, at least know more than the interviewer! )

    (Original post by JennLousie)
    Just checking! It's my first choice so I'm desperate not to ruin my interview on Wednesday!

    Good luck!
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    To give you a bit more perspective on why people keep saying you really can't pin down your interests before you go in, as a final year student at the moment.

    As an applicant, I got interested in doing medicine purely because I watched Scrubs and House on TV - and that's the truth. I had had a fair bit of contact with doctors growing up (through myself being ill as a child, and family members being ill when I was growing up), but it didn't really inspire me to become one or anything. I was always scientifically-minded, I loved a bit of problem-solving, wanted to be the "detective" figure, and really did want to help people. So following in the footsteps of J.D. and House seemed a good way to go. This is how I answered the "why medicine?" question, while like ecolier said, leaving out the stuff about TV hahaha.

    I was most interested in: A&E, medical specialties (like cardiology, respiratory medicine, infectious disease, neurology and nephrology).
    I felt neutrally about: surgery, of all kinds, anaesthetics/ICU
    I thought I'd hate: dermatology, psychiatry, GP (this is where I did all of my work experience), and musculoskeletal medicine

    Obviously I had no idea what working in any of these was like.

    Now as a final year student

    I absolutely LOVE: Psychiatry - turns out that psychiatric illness is completely fascinating; it's a patient population I can empathise very heavily with and I find building a therapeutic alliance with them rewarding; and you can make a big difference in their quality of life. Good work-life balance. Good understanding of a niche area of medicine. Unique set of skills. Good balance of ward and clinic work.

    GP - huge variety of presentations requiring breadth of knowledge; lots of opportunities to manage undifferentiated illness (detective!!!); lots of things for you to take a special interest in (I can do my bit of psychiatry and bit of MSK and bit of derm right here!); you get to make good long-lasting relationships with your patients; great work-life balance; and I actually turned out to really like sitting in a clinic room all day as opposed to sitting about a ward repeating the exact same process on every patient 40x a day.

    Dermatology - interesting pathology; impactful management; great lifestyle; $$$$$$$.

    A&E - I ended up being right about this one. I'm a complete A&E junkie. I love working with acute illness. It's the most interesting part of medicine. And I literally get to play as a detective all day every day. Your management has direct impact on patients; you get to a great mix of brainy stuff and hands-on stuff. Only bad side is you often don't know what happens to your patients next (short contact time) and your lifestyle ****ing SUCKS. That's why I probs won't end up doing this; it has to really be the only thing keeping you going in life to be able to put up with the shitey shift pattern.

    Acute Medicine - Didn't consider this before starting med school. Same reasons I like A&E. Acute medicine is kinda like A&E except it's the period immediately following that first four hours, which offers its own unique opportunities, skillsets and challenges which is rewarding in a similar but different way.

    Things I feel neutrally about:

    Anaesthetics/ICU - I've always been a physiology nerd, so anaesthetics fits me well. It's got lots of practical sides to it. I like the idea of being the proverbial master of the airway. And it's kinda cool to be a literal life-saver. ICU interesting as it's like a mix between anaesthetics and acute medicine. But I dunno if I like this one enough to do it as a career, but I did really enjoy it.

    Radiology - their life sounds so god damn lit.

    Things I absolutely hate:

    Surgery - I never imagined how tedious, boring and mind-numbing operations actually were. God forbid, I'll insist on having any procedure I have to have done on me under GA just so I never have to spend a single waking moment inside a theatre beside a surgeon ever again. It's a shame, because the diagnosis and medical management of surgical problems is actually pretty interesting. I don't think I'll mind working surgical wards too much as an F1/F2. But surgery itself is so mindnumbingly dull that I've avoided it as much as possible during medical school, and I'll continue doing so after I graduate.

    Most medical specialties - interesting pathologies, interesting management plans, boring job. Endlessly rounding all day and then fiddling with medications for your chronic population? No thanks. Most of the ones I thought I was interested in pre-medical school I actually ended up hating so much in medical school. Inc. neurology (sorry écolier! )

    Paediatrics - *****y lifestyle; kids suck.

    O&G - how anyone likes it is beyond me.



    So you can see how my actual interests ended up turning out almost exactly the opposite from what I thought they'd be when I went into it!! So be careful not to judge books by their cover: everyone else is right that you have no way of figuring out what you're actually interested in until you've worked the jobs.
 
 
 
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