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    Hello all,
    So I am currently in year 12 and will be applying to medical schools for 2019 entry. I have been reading about interviews lately (good to be as informed as possible early on, right?) and something which has came up many times is answering questions using personal detail and making answers unique to yourself.

    I understand this and see that admissions tutors would like to see personal dedication and commitment to the course, rather than being naive or applying for the sake of it, however I’m slightly worried that I’m rather boring to be honest.

    I’ve never had any sort of magical revelation that I wanted to do medicine, it was simply a decision. I grew up with no healthcare professionals in the family. I have (thankfully) never had a serious ailment or been part of a medical emergency of any sort. I know that they won’t expect this, but it means I don’t have anything particularly fascinating to say which is “personal.”

    It feels like I can’t say much else rather than “I want to help people” or “I love studying science and human biology” or “I believe that the work load will be manageable and rewarding.” It feels that everything I can say, even though it is truly genuine, sounds basic and boring and something anyone could say.

    It is, indeed very true that I really do just want a career where I can work hard and use my abilities to help improve people’s lives as I’m very people oriented and would find this incredibly rewarding. But what are some examples of giving a “personal” answer that sounds genuinely good? I’m not sure how to approach it properly and avoid sounding like a boring uninformed applicant.

    Thank you for any advice you can give.
    (I’m happy to elaborate on any points about myself If anyone asks, as I’ve not went into much detail about my interest in medicine here of course.)

    UPDATE: another important point I missed, was that I do have a lot to say - I can go on for hours to my friends about why I really want to do medicine. But i feel scared with an interview situation, as I need to be careful about what i say....
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    (Original post by nylrehs)
    ...
    I’ve never had any sort of magical revelation that I wanted to do medicine, it was simply a decision....
    Ok, why did you make this decision? There must be a reason...

    It feels like I can’t say much else rather than “I want to help people” or “I love studying science and human biology” or “I believe that the work load will be manageable and rewarding.” It feels that everything I can say, even though it is truly genuine, sounds basic and boring and something anyone could say.
    No, but if you have to say something it's better this than nothing, or stuttering / clearly memorised responses.

    It is, indeed very true that I really do just want a career where I can work hard and use my abilities to help improve people’s lives as I’m very people oriented and would find this incredibly rewarding.
    That would have made a great foundation to an answer!

    But what are some examples of giving a “personal” answer that sounds genuinely good? I’m not sure how to approach it properly and avoid sounding like a boring uninformed applicant....
    Draft one, and let us be the judge! (PM if you don't want your example "leaked"!)
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    (Original post by nylrehs)

    It feels like I can’t say much else rather than “I want to help people” or “I love studying science and human biology” or “I believe that the work load will be manageable and rewarding.” It feels that everything I can say, even though it is truly genuine, sounds basic and boring and something anyone could say.
    Expand a little bit more on the above and I think that's a satisfactory answer. It is unfair to expect a 'special' response to a question like this when most people don't have one. I basically said the above and did fine - in my experience they don't tend to dwell on these standard questions too much since everyone comes with something boring and pre-rehearsed.

    Also, have a search for interview books for medicine. They certainly helped me a lot.
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    (Original post by Someone123123)
    Expand a little bit more on the above and I think that's a satisfactory answer. It is unfair to expect a 'special' response to a question like this when most people don't have one. I basically said the above and did fine - in my experience they don't tend to dwell on these standard questions too much since everyone comes with something boring and pre-rehearsed.

    Also, have a search for interview books for medicine. They certainly helped me a lot.
    Yeah, that’s what I was thinking. So I’m glad they don’t put too much emphasis on them then. I haven’t actually considered getting books on the interview - thanks for the idea!
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    It is a bit early to worry about interviews, you’re gonna have to revisit this thread next year!

    For me I think what made it personal is my work experience and the stories that went with it. I almost cried on one of my interviews because of the story as it just happened and the emotions were still raw (I didn’t cry! took a deep breath and kept myself together phew) but I think I showed a lot of emotion and made it honest and personal. I always find that when I speak about why I want to do medicine or tell my favourite story from my work experience I kind of light up as it’s what I’m passionate about, and honestly you’ll find something like that to talk about. Don’t keep it scripted, but try to keep it together. Just find something you like talking about and you lighting up talking about it will make it personal

    Also do try to pinpoint why it is medicine, why not nursing? Why not paramedic? Why specifically is it medicine? I know it’s difficult but as long as you find the answer to why did you not choose anything else that helps people you should be fine
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    (Original post by nylrehs)
    Yeah, that’s what I was thinking. So I’m glad they don’t put too much emphasis on them then. I haven’t actually considered getting books on the interview - thanks for the idea!
    No problem -- but prepare for every eventuality regardless, just incase you do have a interviewer who won't instantly move on from that question. I think I used the book by some Olivier fella - Picard is his surname I think.
 
 
 
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