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    Calling all Physiotherapy students! I am currently in Year 12 and I wish to study phisiotherapy at university. I was just wondering if you could answer some questions so I can kind of have an idea of everything, as I have never had anyone speak or talk to me about physiotherapy:

    1. Why did you choose physiotherapy?
    2. What do/did you learn and what kind of work (essays, coursework..) do you do? (If there is any)
    3. How are the lectures like?
    4. What uni do you go to? (If you do not mind saying it)
    5. Anything else to add?

    I know these questions are vague but any contributions are appreciated! Thank you.
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    Hi - sorry you haven't had a response to this yet. I'm just going to bump the thread in the hope that someone sees this and can help
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    (Original post by namelessfeelsx)
    Calling all Physiotherapy students! I am currently in Year 12 and I wish to study phisiotherapy at university. I was just wondering if you could answer some questions so I can kind of have an idea of everything, as I have never had anyone speak or talk to me about physiotherapy:

    1. Why did you choose physiotherapy?
    2. What do/did you learn and what kind of work (essays, coursework..) do you do? (If there is any)
    3. How are the lectures like?
    4. What uni do you go to? (If you do not mind saying it)
    5. Anything else to add?

    I know these questions are vague but any contributions are appreciated! Thank you.
    Hello! I hope this isn’t too late a reply for you. Physio is great! I’m a first year student currently.

    1. I wanted to do something in healthcare. Originally I thought medicine (most of us assume there’s just medicine or nursing when we’re younger haha!), but I knew I wouldn’t get an A in chemistry, so started looking at my other options. I like exercise, but I’m not “sporty” as such, so physio never really came into my radar, but since I was convinced I wanted to work in healthcare (helping people + science, such a cliche), I did work experience in various areas, and physio is so much broader than sports! In fact sports is just a tiny part of it. It’s certainly something you could specialise in if that’s what you like, but very few jobs are sports based. (I can tell you more about what areas physios work in if you’d like) I love physio because you get direct contact with patients, you get to diagnose issues and use clinical reasoning to come up with treatments, and for better or worse, physio isn’t a career where your patients will quickly get better. It’s about rehab, which could mean helping someone come to terms with disability, physio helps people live in the long term.

    2. We have several modules, covering assessment, anatomy, pathology (diseases), communication and basic science. We do both practicals and lectures, as well as anatomy with cadavers. It’s great if you’re a hands on learner, but I’d be lying if I said there’s no studying. There’s still a lot of content to cover, particularly in the case of anatomy.

    3. I think my answer would be the same as anyone at any university - some are good, some not so good! This depends on the lecturer and the topic I think.

    4. I won’t tell you where I study, but I’ll tell you where I applied to give you an idea: Brighton, Brunel, St George’s, UEL, Oxford Brooke’s

    5. Not at the moment, but I’m happy to answer any questions!! Hope this helped.
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    (Original post by Kugelmugel)
    Hello! I hope this isn’t too late a reply for you. Physio is great! I’m a first year student currently.

    1. I wanted to do something in healthcare. Originally I thought medicine (most of us assume there’s just medicine or nursing when we’re younger haha!), but I knew I wouldn’t get an A in chemistry, so started looking at my other options. I like exercise, but I’m not “sporty” as such, so physio never really came into my radar, but since I was convinced I wanted to work in healthcare (helping people + science, such a cliche), I did work experience in various areas, and physio is so much broader than sports! In fact sports is just a tiny part of it. It’s certainly something you could specialise in if that’s what you like, but very few jobs are sports based. (I can tell you more about what areas physios work in if you’d like) I love physio because you get direct contact with patients, you get to diagnose issues and use clinical reasoning to come up with treatments, and for better or worse, physio isn’t a career where your patients will quickly get better. It’s about rehab, which could mean helping someone come to terms with disability, physio helps people live in the long term.

    2. We have several modules, covering assessment, anatomy, pathology (diseases), communication and basic science. We do both practicals and lectures, as well as anatomy with cadavers. It’s great if you’re a hands on learner, but I’d be lying if I said there’s no studying. There’s still a lot of content to cover, particularly in the case of anatomy.

    3. I think my answer would be the same as anyone at any university - some are good, some not so good! This depends on the lecturer and the topic I think.

    4. I won’t tell you where I study, but I’ll tell you where I applied to give you an idea: Brighton, Brunel, St George’s, UEL, Oxford Brooke’s

    5. Not at the moment, but I’m happy to answer any questions!! Hope this helped.
    Hello! Thank you so much for your answer and your time writing this, I really enjoyed reading it! I’m in a similar situation as you were. I didn’t really think of medicine as an option because I knew I wouldn’t be committed to so many years of study but I want to do something related to healthcare and helping people. I would love to know what areas physios work in. Although I’ve already done some research on it I would still like to know from you hahaha. I was a bit scared when you mentioned cadavers... do you mean like real deceased bodies? Lastly, what kind of work experience did you do and how did you find them? For me it’s really difficult to find one so if you could give me some advice that would be great. I hope I’m not bombarding you with too many questions 😅
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    (Original post by namelessfeelsx)
    Hello! Thank you so much for your answer and your time writing this, I really enjoyed reading it! I’m in a similar situation as you were. I didn’t really think of medicine as an option because I knew I wouldn’t be committed to so many years of study but I want to do something related to healthcare and helping people. I would love to know what areas physios work in. Although I’ve already done some research on it I would still like to know from you hahaha. I was a bit scared when you mentioned cadavers... do you mean like real deceased bodies? Lastly, what kind of work experience did you do and how did you find them? For me it’s really difficult to find one so if you could give me some advice that would be great. I hope I’m not bombarding you with too many questions 😅
    Omg I left that post then forgot to reply I'm so sorry!!

    Physios work in so many areas! The main three are MSK (musculoskeletal), neuro and cardio-respiratory. But you can specialise in tonnes of other areas, such as paediatrics, mental health, amputees, women's health, palliative care, sports, ITU...

    MSK is probably what you'd think of when you think "physio", but personally I'm really interested in neuro physio because I love the science behind it, and that might involve working with people who have had major nerve damage and trying to help them regain function.

    Yes, cadavers does mean real deceased dead bodies! I didn't really know what to expect before going into it, I think I thought there would literally just be tables with dead people, but it's not quite like that! It can be a bit nerve wracking and gruesome at first, but it's a great way to learn, and remembering that they were living people and someone's mother/brother/friend makes it less creepy. I'd be happy to answer more questions about that if you have them!

    I don't know if all unis have cadavers, but a fair few do I think!

    Work experience really can be so hard to find!! For me nobody in my family is medical, which made it quite hard, but I do think any relevant experience is good, it doesn't all have to be physio specific.

    For example, I volunteered at my local hospital on a ward for 20 weeks, which I really enjoyed (it was probably this more than anything that convinced me what area I wanted to work in) and it gave me a lot to talk about at interviews, especially since you get to interact with patients far more than you do on work experience.

    Other work experience:
    - 1 day in private practice physio (don't think I'll ever understand why somebody would choose to work there, wasn't the most exciting)
    - 1 day in a paediatric ward
    - 2 days are my local hospital rotating around the different physio areas
    - 1 day at my local hospice

    I also got work experience in different areas while I was deciding what to do, so I also shadowed nurses and doctors.

    My best advice would be search for a family member/friend who has connections, or just keep asking your local hospital/service if they have any spaces!

    Definitely volunteer if you can, it doesn't have to be in a hospital, but it'll really boost your application. They (the unis) want to know that you're sure about your decision to be a physio, but really they want to know that you're good with people and have empathy, and you can really show that through volunteering (or even relevant paid work).

    Let me know if you have any other questions - sorry for the very late reply!!
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    (Original post by Kugelmugel)
    Omg I left that post then forgot to reply I'm so sorry!!

    Physios work in so many areas! The main three are MSK (musculoskeletal), neuro and cardio-respiratory. But you can specialise in tonnes of other areas, such as paediatrics, mental health, amputees, women's health, palliative care, sports, ITU...

    MSK is probably what you'd think of when you think "physio", but personally I'm really interested in neuro physio because I love the science behind it, and that might involve working with people who have had major nerve damage and trying to help them regain function.

    Yes, cadavers does mean real deceased dead bodies! I didn't really know what to expect before going into it, I think I thought there would literally just be tables with dead people, but it's not quite like that! It can be a bit nerve wracking and gruesome at first, but it's a great way to learn, and remembering that they were living people and someone's mother/brother/friend makes it less creepy. I'd be happy to answer more questions about that if you have them!

    I don't know if all unis have cadavers, but a fair few do I think!

    Work experience really can be so hard to find!! For me nobody in my family is medical, which made it quite hard, but I do think any relevant experience is good, it doesn't all have to be physio specific.

    For example, I volunteered at my local hospital on a ward for 20 weeks, which I really enjoyed (it was probably this more than anything that convinced me what area I wanted to work in) and it gave me a lot to talk about at interviews, especially since you get to interact with patients far more than you do on work experience.

    Other work experience:
    - 1 day in private practice physio (don't think I'll ever understand why somebody would choose to work there, wasn't the most exciting)
    - 1 day in a paediatric ward
    - 2 days are my local hospital rotating around the different physio areas
    - 1 day at my local hospice

    I also got work experience in different areas while I was deciding what to do, so I also shadowed nurses and doctors.

    My best advice would be search for a family member/friend who has connections, or just keep asking your local hospital/service if they have any spaces!

    Definitely volunteer if you can, it doesn't have to be in a hospital, but it'll really boost your application. They (the unis) want to know that you're sure about your decision to be a physio, but really they want to know that you're good with people and have empathy, and you can really show that through volunteering (or even relevant paid work).

    Let me know if you have any other questions - sorry for the very late reply!!
    Hello! Sorry for replying so late :embarrassed:. I find your advice really really helpful. Thank you very much for your answer. I really hope I can cope with the cadavers (if there is any at the uni I might go to). I don't find them gruesome but I just cannot get my head around it, wow. Anyways I have found a 9 -days work experience at my local hospital in which I will have the opportunity to shadow a physio. It took a bit of persistence but I finally go it haha.

    You have cleared all my doubts, thank you so much for your help!
 
 
 
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