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US stock market and entire crypto market are both in a significant slump watch

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    (Original post by Ninja Squirrel)
    You're thinking far too small
    When did you buy in to bitcoin and did you sell at the peak of the bubble?
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    (Original post by D3LLI5)
    When did you buy in to bitcoin and did you sell at the peak of the bubble?
    I bought bitcoin around August 2016 for about $575 a piece and I've not sold a single bitcoin yet.

    When the peak of the bubble comes I'll let you know
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    (Original post by Chaz254)
    I already said I agree it's hard to see how it can be used as a currency whilst it's so volatile.

    Glad you mentioned the Bitcoin supply! Do you know the basic laws of supply and demand? When supply stops increasing, there becomes a limited amount of Bitcoin in existence. That increases the value. You do know that legal tender is only printed by central banks if they as undertaking Quantitative Easing (QE) monetary policy. It's not in banks' best interest to continually print money.
    Forgive me, but I am no expert in financial matters, but my understanding is that banks create money all the time. I borrow £1000 from the bank and use it to buy a car. I also promise to repay the bank + interest of £100. The owner of the car pays their £1000 back into the bank which can be lent out again. Each time it is lent out, there is a promise of the capital sum + interest. The bank is effectively making money out of thin air. There is vastly more money in the system compared to 100 years ago regardless of quantitative easing. A closed system like Bitcoin can't accommodate fundamental of money surely?
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    (Original post by ByEeek)
    Forgive me, but I am no expert in financial matters, but my understanding is that banks create money all the time. I borrow £1000 from the bank and use it to buy a car. I also promise to repay the bank interest of £100. The owner of the car pays their £1000 back into the bank which can be lent out again. Each time it is lent out, there is a promise of the capital sum interest. The bank is effectively making money out of thin air. There is vastly more money in the system compared to 100 years ago regardless of quantitative easing. A closed system like Bitcoin can't accommodate fundamental of money surely?
    True, money is created out of thin air from commercial banks (I probably have similar level of knowledge to you on this subject), as they just put numbers on a computer. I was more referring to physically printing money (notes and coins), which is QE which is not always taking place. Though your point where commercial banks create money is valid, too.

    Bitcoin's (along with most cryptocurrencies) supply has a maximum. There will only be a certain amount of them to exist, ever. Therefore supply is limited and that fact makes them more valueable. Furthermore, when Bitcoin is transferred, some is lost due to blockchain fees, so the supply further decreases due to this, creating slightly more value. This makes it a solid investment asset. I agree with you that it is hard to use it as an actual currency.
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    (Original post by Chaz254)
    True, money is created out of thin air from commercial banks (I probably have similar level of knowledge to you on this subject), as they just put numbers on a computer. I was more referring to physically printing money (notes and coins), which is QE which is not always taking place. Though your point where commercial banks create money is valid, too.

    Bitcoin's (along with most cryptocurrencies) supply has a maximum. There will only be a certain amount of them to exist, ever. Therefore supply is limited and that fact makes them more valueable. Furthermore, when Bitcoin is transferred, some is lost due to blockchain fees, so the supply further decreases due to this, creating slightly more value. This makes it a solid investment asset. I agree with you that it is hard to use it as an actual currency.
    I think your understanding of quantitative easing is a little out. It isn't the physical printing of money. Money is simply a formal IOU with the Bank that issued it being the guarantor. QE involves the government buying back government bonds. In effect it is making good the IOUs if sold in return for money. Imagine the bank giving you back your savings. And once that money is in your pocket, you go and spend it.

    But a limited amount of money is not necessarily a good thing. There was a time when money was tied to the value of gold (the gold standard). Naturally there is a finite amount of gold in the world so the amount of money was limited. Some would argue that this prolonged the Great Depression

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gold_s...d_World_War_II
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    (Original post by ByEeek)
    I think your understanding of quantitative easing is a little out. It isn't the physical printing of money. Money is simply a formal IOU with the Bank that issued it being the guarantor. QE involves the government buying back government bonds. In effect it is making good the IOUs if sold in return for money. Imagine the bank giving you back your savings. And once that money is in your pocket, you go and spend it.

    But a limited amount of money is not necessarily a good thing. There was a time when money was tied to the value of gold (the gold standard). Naturally there is a finite amount of gold in the world so the amount of money was limited. Some would argue that this prolonged the Great Depression

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gold_s...d_World_War_II
    Actually QE is not the government, it's the central bank which tends to be independent of the government. QE was provided by the Fed, BoE, and is still being provided by the ECB,
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    Bit annoying, went from paper profit of a grand to a paper loss of a grand.

    Hey ho, at least everything is cheaper to buy up come pay day.
 
 
 
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