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    History and religious studies have both been my favourite subjects since year nine and I'm now in year 12, but I can't decide between them!

    I love religious studies especially buddhism and ethics, but I worry about the job prospects afterwards, I want to do a job I enjoy and not a generic sort of job in communications or something - I want my degree to be worthwhile. But I really love buddhism a lot and feel I'd be missing something if I didn't study it further. But I think i could do something more valuable with my time than research a religion for my entire life? Even if I love it, is it selfish that I'm not doing more to help the world? (all my friends want to be in medicine)

    At the same time, I also really love history, especially political, and it has much better job prospects in the sense that I could take a law conversion course, or maybe even get an international relations masters degree and go into UN work or something. But I don't know if a serious job like that would bore me, for example law going through papers and documents etc.

    I would love to hear from history/religious studies students or graduates? Or anyone with any advice thank you
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    Doing either Religious Studies or History as a degree gives you a lot of transferrable skills that will open you up to many graduate schemes such as accounting, law, HR, etc. What you want to do as a career will largely depend on your interests and what experience you get whilst studying.

    I did Theology and Religious Studies at university, and career fields include working for the government, accounting, law conversion courses, business, further study and teaching. If you find Religious Studies interesting, why not study it - or you could look at join honours between Religious Studies and History?
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    I spend every day working in/around Buddhism (ad Indian philosophy more generally). I'm not sure about the 'helping the world' thing (any contribution to knowledge is worthwhile, but of course being a medic has more direct implications) being much to distinguish anything by.

    In any case, there are options open to you if you want to focus on Buddhism. There are countless courses all over the place, including at Oxford's Centre for Buddhist Studies. There are world-leading scholars of Indian religion and philosophy at SOAS, Bristol, Liverpool, Lancaster, but work-wise it will generally go one of a few ways - research and teaching in a university (me), teaching in a school (but with a favoured specialism), becoming a monastic (which you needn't have qualifications to do). These are the direct routes open to you.

    There are innumerate indirect routes, as with any humanities degree, but you really need to decide what route you'd like to take, viz. a vocational degree like medicine of engineering, or not.

    You don't need to have a degree in Buddhist thought in order to carry on learning about it, either (though the immersion definitely helps). In fact, Harvard are running an online course for free from today.
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    (Original post by gjd800)
    I spend every day working in/around Buddhism (ad Indian philosophy more generally). I'm not sure about the 'helping the world' thing (any contribution to knowledge is worthwhile, but of course being a medic has more direct implications) being much to distinguish anything by.

    In any case, there are options open to you if you want to focus on Buddhism. There are countless courses all over the place, including at Oxford's Centre for Buddhist Studies. There are world-leading scholars of Indian religion and philosophy at SOAS, Bristol, Liverpool, Lancaster, but work-wise it will generally go one of a few ways - research and teaching in a university (me), teaching in a school (but with a favoured specialism), becoming a monastic (which you needn't have qualifications to do). These are the direct routes open to you.

    There are innumerate indirect routes, as with any humanities degree, but you really need to decide what route you'd like to take, viz. a vocational degree like medicine of engineering, or not.

    You don't need to have a degree in Buddhist thought in order to carry on learning about it, either (though the immersion definitely helps). In fact, Harvard are running an online course for free from today.
    Wow your life sounds like my dream haha, I would love to go into research and lecturing, and I guess I never though about impacting through the gaining of knowledge. Thank you very much, and I'll look into the harvard course!
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    (Original post by bidoof55)
    Wow your life sounds like my dream haha, I would love to go into research and lecturing, and I guess I never though about impacting through the gaining of knowledge. Thank you very much, and I'll look into the harvard course!
    If it is something you are really interested in, then taking the religion degree could work out really well for you! It might also be worth thinking about a philosophy degree in a place that has an expert in Indian philosophy/Buddhism. There are loads of options at places like those mentioned above.

    It's not easy to get a foot in the door job-wise in universities these days, but good degrees and a bit of stubbornness goes a long way. I'd personally love to see more young talent interested in Buddhism. Buddhology, and Indology - good luck with whatever you decide!
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    (Original post by gjd800)
    If it is something you are really interested in, then taking the religion degree could work out really well for you! It might also be worth thinking about a philosophy degree in a place that has an expert in Indian philosophy/Buddhism. There are loads of options at places like those mentioned above.

    It's not easy to get a foot in the door job-wise in universities these days, but good degrees and a bit of stubbornness goes a long way. I'd personally love to see more young talent interested in Buddhism. Buddhology, and Indology - good luck with whatever you decide!
    Thank you! I think it is probably the right decision for me, it just depends on whether I have the guts to do it. Thank you for the encouragement, I think I'll also do some background reading into Indian philosophy because I'm not studying it at sixth form but am definitely interested. Are there any books you could recommend to read?
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    (Original post by bidoof55)
    Thank you! I think it is probably the right decision for me, it just depends on whether I have the guts to do it. Thank you for the encouragement, I think I'll also do some background reading into Indian philosophy because I'm not studying it at sixth form but am definitely interested. Are there any books you could recommend to read?
    There's a really nice, accessible textbook called 'Introduction to Indian Philosophy' by a guy called Christopher Bartley. It's very nice and covers a lot of ground in an interesting way without being overwhelming. I think you can pick it up for reasonable prices on Amazon etc,, maybe even as an ebook if that's your thing.
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    (Original post by gjd800)
    There's a really nice, accessible textbook called 'Introduction to Indian Philosophy' by a guy called Christopher Bartley. It's very nice and covers a lot of ground in an interesting way without being overwhelming. I think you can pick it up for reasonable prices on Amazon etc,, maybe even as an ebook if that's your thing.
    Thank you so much!
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    (Original post by bidoof55)
    Thank you so much!
    Not a problem, glad to be of use.
 
 
 
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