Turn on thread page Beta

Schools Minister says more exams is the solution to Mental Health watch

    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by EstelOfTheEyrie)
    And the way in which exams are fundamentally structured is a mistake - especially when they're supposed to get you prepared for a working life.
    Like, I've just gone from A levels to temporary employment in my gap year before university, and not once when I've been learning stuff has my manager/supervisor gone and taken my notes away when I've needed them.

    The idea that we're supposed to know everything off by heart and recite it in the space of 1-2 1/2 hours is beyond comprehension. We're surrounded by access points for information, so even if we do need to know something we can quickly research it. and learn new skills in the same way (e.g - you want to learn how to tie a tie? YouTube it. Which US figures are on their coins and notes? There's a Wikipedia page somewhere.)

    And it's not like the exams are an adequate way of testing intelligence anyway. One bad day in the exam after months of hard work can make it all redundant and destroy future plans if you're not careful. You can be working at A/A* level for 2 years, and then 1 day that leads to a C in that paper can mean the difference in Tertiary education and the feeling of idiocy etc. etc.
    Completely agree. It frustrates me how you can revise all day, every day and one bad morning or afternoon on the day of the exam means you achieve nowhere near what you're capable of. I'm always split between how I feel about my degree - I got a 2.2 and it embarrasses me to admit it because of how much a 2.2 is generally looked down on and I know I could have done better, but then due to the mental health problems I was suffering with at the time, I've done really well to even finish uni, let alone get a mark higher than a pass.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by EstelOfTheEyrie)
    And it's not like the exams are an adequate way of testing intelligence anyway. One bad day in the exam after months of hard work can make it all redundant and destroy future plans if you're not careful. You can be working at A/A* level for 2 years, and then 1 day that leads to a C in that paper can mean the difference in Tertiary education and the feeling of idiocy etc. etc.
    Exactly, I find exams are actually detrimental to mental health in a way, and that adding even more would increase stress in students. I'm a good A grade student, but over the past year my grades have been dropping due to mental health difficulties. If the mocks that I'm having now actually counted for something, I would be screwed because I am not in a good mental place to be doing these at all. I'm terrified for the actual A levels in June, and the fact that they're so clumped together when my brain can only focus on one thing at a time just stresses me out even more.

    If someone does rubbish in an exam, that can completely change their future despite them getting good grades all year long and being really clever! And likewise, the exams test memory recall more than anything, someone could do amazingly well because they've learned mark schemes and how to manipulate the memorized information as opposed to actually understanding it! Plus some parents can be really strict and having more exams means they will push their kids even further to get top grades constantly despite the mental strain this can put them under...
    Basically (as others have said!),
    More exams = more stress = more negative thoughts = worse mental health amongst pupils
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Kay, so I'm not saying exams will help with mental health, but this guy may have somewhat of a point a. It's not a surprise at all that so many kids are struggling with depression nowadays, I mean, we've built such an ironic society it's disgusting.

    Take a look at places children spend most of their time on now like instagram or snapchat... man... we've became so obsessed with idolizing this perfect lifestyle with all of these beautiful colours, amazing people and adventures everywhere, that perhaps somewhere between building a civilization where the only goal wasn't to survive and the media becoming what they are now, we've grown to be a bit too comfortable. And as a kid, you're at your most comfortable position in life, so naturally you hit a brick wall when you start getting your head around things. Even 10 years ago when I used to run around the estate people who were constantly sad were just weird, so it was better to not be one of them in the first place. Nowadays depression's swinging between being normal and popular, along with people becoming too expecting, too emotional, too feminized.

    People who's existence is endangered don't have existential crisis problems. We've gone way too soft, but the thing is, the nature of life hasn't. Maybe more exam preparation before GCSEs would help with the stress of GCSEs? Maybe that could slightly help with the well-being of the society, don't know.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Personally never had exam stress :/ must be lucky.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    The title is misleading.

    He's saying that by doing exams in earlier years, thus preparing students for exams, will help reduce the stress of doing exams. It makes sense.

    He's not talking about adding more exams to the courses - in fact, the reforms have reduced the amount of exams by almost half.

    Everyone will have to do academic exams at one point, so getting students use to exam conditions so they feel less anxious about real exams is not a crazy claim to make at all. That's literally why we do mocks.
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by bones-mccoy)
    Changing it so that students only have one set of exams in May/June was a mistake, definitely.

    I am always so amazed how out-of-touch the people in these high-flying roles are, like they're not in the real world.
    You know what I actually think they are in the real world because they know how to make people suffer and to turn the world into robots who work non stop just for their economic gain... that’s the establishment’s ultimate aim...
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    My near panic attack in my recent exam says it will do the exact opposite
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lowza)
    The title is misleading.

    He's saying that by doing exams in earlier years, thus preparing students for exams, will help reduce the stress of doing exams. It makes sense.

    He's not talking about adding more exams to the courses - in fact, the reforms have reduced the amount of exams by almost half.

    Everyone will have to do academic exams at one point, so getting students use to exam conditions so they feel less anxious about real exams is not a crazy claim to make at all. That's literally why we do mocks.
    That's going to interfere with the natural learning process, possibly killing any love of learning the child may have had
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    That's ridiculous. I started having exams when I was about eight. And exam weeks from Year 7. It hasn't helped me in any way. I understand mocks, but putting even more pressure on young students is awful.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mine turtle)
    That's going to interfere with the natural learning process, possibly killing any love of learning the child may have had
    It's not a new piece of legislation - he's not forcing schools into giving earlier exams.

    His department have reduced exams.

    In response to worries about exam anxiety, he's suggested preparing children for exams earlier to reduce stress. It is a fair and reasonable comment.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by S.G.)
    I see his point and agree with it to a reasonable extent.

    The Year 7-9 curriculum is crap, and it’s often a shock to the system when you suddenly do to do exams during GCSEs etc. I feel it’s added stress when you’re doing exams that matter but it’s your first real experience. That probably does incite panic in some people.

    A transitional period with some exams at the end of the years during KS3, not like 30 odd, but at least in English maths and science can help I feel.
    My school literally did do end of year exams through years 7-9 and everybody still **** themselves through GCSE and A level.
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Retired_Messiah)
    My school literally did do end of year exams through years 7-9 and everybody still **** themselves through GCSE and A level.
    Your school did. There’s no consistent scheme as far as I’m aware. My school didn’t. We had like end of topic tests in Years 7-9 but nothing more.

    I don’t see the harm in all honesty.

    Also, these years seem to be a waste of time anyway (perhaps this statement is extreme). Most of the things done in Years 7-9 often had no resemblance to the GCSE curriculum.
    • Community Assistant
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by Trinculo)
    People are commenting with the usual anger and Tory hate without even reading what he said.

    Standard.
    Are you speculating on what people you don't know have or haven't done with their time or do you have access yo their browsing history?
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lowza)
    It's not a new piece of legislation - he's not forcing schools into giving earlier exams.

    His department have reduced exams.

    In response to worries about exam anxiety, he's suggested preparing children for exams earlier to reduce stress. It is a fair and reasonable comment.
    Oh OK
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by S.G.)
    Your school did. There’s no consistent scheme as far as I’m aware. My school didn’t. We had like end of topic tests in Years 7-9 but nothing more.

    I don’t see the harm in all honesty.

    Also, these years seem to be a waste of time anyway (perhaps this statement is extreme). Most of the things done in Years 7-9 often had no resemblance to the GCSE curriculum.
    The point was more that my school is a prime example of his suggestion not doing what he proposes it would do. Even end of topic tests are barely different in terms of style of assessment from GCSEs anyway. You all sit in silence for a bit writing answers you've had to memorise. GCSE barely changes the formula, it just puts you in a bigger room with more people making sure you don't cheat. Students are for the most part already used to that aspect when they go in under the current system.

    The harm would be that some students are daft enough to get worked up about tests that don't even count for things. People at my school did, on occasion. And then they did the same at GCSE 'cause their earlier tests hadn't prepped them for ****.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    There is no need for people to have 10 or more GSCEs. There should be fewer, though having one or two at an earlier time than May/June would address the issue raised by the minister.
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Retired_Messiah)
    The point was more that my school is a prime example of his suggestion not doing what he proposes it would do. Even end of topic tests are barely different in terms of style of assessment from GCSEs anyway. You all sit in silence for a bit writing answers you've had to memorise. GCSE barely changes the formula, it just puts you in a bigger room with more people making sure you don't cheat. Students are for the most part already used to that aspect when they go in under the current system.

    The harm would be that some students are daft enough to get worked up about tests that don't even count for things. People at my school did, on occasion. And then they did the same at GCSE 'cause their earlier tests hadn't prepped them for ****.
    Yeah fair enough. I’ve nothing else to add.
    • Community Assistant
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by EstelOfTheEyrie)
    And the way in which exams are fundamentally structured is a mistake - especially when they're supposed to get you prepared for a working life.
    Like, I've just gone from A levels to temporary employment in my gap year before university, and not once when I've been learning stuff has my manager/supervisor gone and taken my notes away when I've needed them.

    The idea that we're supposed to know everything off by heart and recite it in the space of 1-2 1/2 hours is beyond comprehension. We're surrounded by access points for information, so even if we do need to know something we can quickly research it. and learn new skills in the same way (e.g - you want to learn how to tie a tie? YouTube it. Which US figures are on their coins and notes? There's a Wikipedia page somewhere.)

    And it's not like the exams are an adequate way of testing intelligence anyway. One bad day in the exam after months of hard work can make it all redundant and destroy future plans if you're not careful. You can be working at A/A* level for 2 years, and then 1 day that leads to a C in that paper can mean the difference in Tertiary education and the feeling of idiocy etc. etc.
    I'm liking you more and more as the days go on

    • Community Assistant
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by lowza)
    It is a fair and reasonable comment.
    Except it's stupid to think that more exams translate to better mental health.
    • Community Assistant
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by lowza)
    He's saying that by doing exams in earlier years, will help reduce the stress of doing exams. It makes sense.
    Compulsory externally-set examinations begin in year 2 in this country.
 
 
 
The home of Results and Clearing

3,177

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year
Poll
Will you be tempted to trade up and get out of your firm offer on results day?
Useful resources
Uni match

Applying to uni?

Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Articles:

Debate and current affairs guidelinesDebate and current affairs wiki

Quick link:

Educational debate unanswered threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.