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    At the school im at gcse starts early, we also have predicted grades, I had a choice of A or A*/7 or 8 (weird new grading system) i haven't been doing well in my tests ever since our old teacher left, and im not sure if it is how i revise, or if im not paying attention as much i should be... Put it this way, my teacher asked me to stay, so she could talk to me, because of how bad i did in my recent test. Please help!!
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    (Original post by MarineVoid)
    At the school im at gcse starts early, we also have predicted grades, I had a choice of A or A*/7 or 8 (weird new grading system) i haven't been doing well in my tests ever since our old teacher left, and im not sure if it is how i revise, or if im not paying attention as much i should be... Put it this way, my teacher asked me to stay, so she could talk to me, because of how bad i did in my recent test. Please help!!
    When you go through lessons, do you understand the topics? Look at which areas you are weakest at, if needed, ask for more help. You could look at practise questions to test your knowledge. It could also be the way you approach the exams - perhaps you aren't answering the questions effectively. Asking your teacher for feedback is the best way forward, be more effective with revision, look at past papers perhaps?
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    If it's only biology you're doing badly in, it's unlikely to be how you revise but more an issue with engagement. As soon as you're not engaging with a subject and uninterested, it's much harder for your brain to remember the information. So it's likely that the main issue is that you're not paying enough attention in classes or while studying !
    My best advice would be to try and use a multitude of resources when revising. Do lots of testing (write your own, find online ones, past exam qus etc), find YouTube channels you resonate with, mix notes with revision books and other sources of info etc. Try and also mix between topics as you study - don't try and tackle one module all at once, but take on 2 or 3 and spend 15-20 mins on each before rotating. Splitting it into smaller chunks will help you remain engaged and helps your brain remember it easier.

    Hope this helpful Some resource sites actually apply quite a few of these methods already so may be worth checking those out and seeing how you find them. Seneca is a free revision platform launching at the start of march https://senecalearning.com/ and have heard it will do this pretty well.

    Also, any topic you come across that you actually don't understand make sure you go and talk to your teacher about. Understanding really helps engagement, and the topics in biology are more interlinked than you realise. means that if you don't understand something now, it'll make later modules trickier.
 
 
 
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