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    I am looking at enrolling onto a Summer school in Asia and wondered what the best courses might be in relation to aiding my legal CV. For instance, would subjects such as International Relations of East Asia and Comparative law be beneficial from an international law firm perspective?

    My reasoning for partaking in such a scheme would partially be to travel and enjoy such a culturally diverse experience but I of course would like to make my trip helpful in an academic/career sense also.

    Korea University, National University of Singapore, Fudan University (Shanghai), Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Tsinghua University (Beijing), Malaysia and China University of Nottingham campuses are the options (the first two being my desired choices thus far).

    Thanks in advance.
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    Gaining an 'international outlook' and perhaps strengthening language skills would be the most tangible benefits of such a venture. My personal opinion is that studying a language while there would be the most useful practical pursuit, particularly if you are interested in firms with offices in Asia too.
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    (Original post by Insecable)
    Gaining an 'international outlook' and perhaps strengthening language skills would be the most tangible benefits of such a venture. My personal opinion is that studying a language while there would be the most useful practical pursuit, particularly if you are interested in firms with offices in Asia too.
    Obviously the more proficient the better but what standard would be seen as advantageous still since learning languages hasn't always been my forte. That and the programmes are 5-8 weeks with a condensed course in that time and making the most of bring abroad.
    I hope to spend a year abroad in Hong Kong where ideally I could pick up a conversational level.
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    (Original post by Chichaldo)
    Obviously the more proficient the better but what standard would be seen as advantageous still since learning languages hasn't always been my forte. That and the programmes are 5-8 weeks with a condensed course in that time and making the most of bring abroad.
    I hope to spend a year abroad in Hong Kong where ideally I could pick up a conversational level.
    Business fluency would probably be ideal. Don't force yourself if it's not your forte though. There are many other benefits to spending time overseas such as broadening your outlook and perspective.
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    (Original post by Chichaldo)
    I am looking at enrolling onto a Summer school in Asia and wondered what the best courses might be in relation to aiding my legal CV. For instance, would subjects such as International Relations of East Asia and Comparative law be beneficial from an international law firm perspective?

    My reasoning for partaking in such a scheme would partially be to travel and enjoy such a culturally diverse experience but I of course would like to make my trip helpful in an academic/career sense also.

    Korea University, National University of Singapore, Fudan University (Shanghai), Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Tsinghua University (Beijing), Malaysia and China University of Nottingham campuses are the options (the first two being my desired choices thus far).

    Thanks in advance.
    Comparative law isn't what you think it is. You may be thinking of conflict of laws/private international law, which are relevant, but they're often highly theoretical and don't bear much semblance to commercial reality. International law is itself a jurisdiction of sorts (in the sense that it has fixed laws, treaties, etc for you to worry about), while international mediation doesn't require hard knowledge of the law as much as it does empathy, a good understanding of business concerns, etc.

    No idea how IR would help substantively in a law degree. You should be studying the law of one these countries, and, even if you were, you'd be outcompeted by the local lawyers who will have been doing it for far longer than you will have been. You're not a political risk analyst at Chatham House.

    I suspect that the cultural / diversity malarkey is overrated. A lot of firms don't put it in the skills they look for (for TCs in London, that is). Sure, being diverse blah blah is good for understanding your clients, but the start of your legal career will have very little client contact. Contacting lawyers in overseas offices isn't the exercise in cultural exploration that you'd imagine it is - you're mostly gonna be doing it by email, with the operating language being English. You don't need to spend the summer in HK to be able to liaise with the HK office, whose lawyers are likely to be native English speakers anyway. The staff in overseas offices aren't as exotic as you'd imagine them to be. Cultural diversity helps more at a partner level, when you may need to have contacts and build connections with clients.

    Honestly, I can't think of anything good that you can pull out of the hat, unless you want to just demonstrate your interest in commercial law in the broadest terms (but then you don't need to go to a summer school in Asia to do that ). I'd much rather be spending my summer interning in London if I wanted to boost my CV. Think of your trip as an experience in itself, not as a half-hearted attempt at CV building.

    Edit: No one cares about language skills unless they're at legal/business fluency levels. Even then, you won't be speaking to the Singapore office in Mandarin.
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    (Original post by JohanGRK)
    while international mediation doesn't require hard knowledge of the law as much as it does empathy, a good understanding of business concerns, etc.
    What do you mean by this exactly? And are you distinguishing mediation from arbitration?
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    (Original post by Notoriety)
    What do you mean by this exactly? And are you distinguishing mediation from arbitration?
    Mediators try to get the parties to reach an agreement. Different skills are needed. They're not the ones who hand down a judgment (as arbitrators) or prepare for court (as litigators).
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    (Original post by JohanGRK)
    Mediators try to get the parties to reach an agreement. Different skills are needed. They're not the ones who hand down a judgment (as arbitrators) or prepare for court (as litigators).
    That's an interesting perspective. I am only familiar with international arbitration, for which litigators and arbitrators are most assuredly experts in the applicable law. The substantive law found in arbitral awards is usually more legal than court decisions. That is because the arbitrator is not tasked with simplifying the law for future users; the broad ugliness of the law is usually considered.

    I wasn't sure if you were conflating mediation with arbitration, because it is arbitration which is regulated by international law rather than mediation.
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    (Original post by Insecable)
    Business fluency would probably be ideal. Don't force yourself if it's not your forte though. There are many other benefits to spending time overseas such as broadening your outlook and perspective.
    Thank you, after all it's not the main reason for my trip. Just thought it'd be best to learn something more worthwhile whilst there
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    (Original post by JohanGRK)
    Comparative law isn't what you think it is. You may be thinking of conflict of laws/private international law, which are relevant, but they're often highly theoretical and don't bear much semblance to commercial reality. International law is itself a jurisdiction of sorts (in the sense that it has fixed laws, treaties, etc for you to worry about), while international mediation doesn't require hard knowledge of the law as much as it does empathy, a good understanding of business concerns, etc.

    No idea how IR would help substantively in a law degree. You should be studying the law of one these countries, and, even if you were, you'd be outcompeted by the local lawyers who will have been doing it for far longer than you will have been. You're not a political risk analyst at Chatham House.

    I suspect that the cultural / diversity malarkey is overrated. A lot of firms don't put it in the skills they look for (for TCs in London, that is). Sure, being diverse blah blah is good for understanding your clients, but the start of your legal career will have very little client contact. Contacting lawyers in overseas offices isn't the exercise in cultural exploration that you'd imagine it is - you're mostly gonna be doing it by email, with the operating language being English. You don't need to spend the summer in HK to be able to liaise with the HK office, whose lawyers are likely to be native English speakers anyway. The staff in overseas offices aren't as exotic as you'd imagine them to be. Cultural diversity helps more at a partner level, when you may need to have contacts and build connections with clients.

    Honestly, I can't think of anything good that you can pull out of the hat, unless you want to just demonstrate your interest in commercial law in the broadest terms (but then you don't need to go to a summer school in Asia to do that ). I'd much rather be spending my summer interning in London if I wanted to boost my CV. Think of your trip as an experience in itself, not as a half-hearted attempt at CV building.

    Edit: No one cares about language skills unless they're at legal/business fluency levels. Even then, you won't be speaking to the Singapore office in Mandarin.
    Okay, okay, chill haha. I'm not going there to build my CV, I want to travel to such places. Can't do any harm though and is a talking point as well as an experience.
    You make it sound like internships in London are easily attainable? It's hard just getting into an insight day
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    (Original post by Chichaldo)
    Okay, okay, chill haha. I'm not going there to build my CV, I want to travel to such places. Can't do any harm though and is a talking point as well as an experience.
    You make it sound like internships in London are easily attainable? It's hard just getting into an insight day
    It's a blunt exposition of reality. Summer schools are junk if they're used for CV fodder. I've worked at my uni's summer school, and it's usually populated by Asians and Latin Americans who think that it will give them an edge when applying for jobs back home, or for postgraduate study in the UK. For them, it probably will - any reputable UK uni is an upgrade to their current institution, and, back home, it may help these students advance their careers somewhat. However, going to some law school as a UK undergrad in Asian isn't gonna help your chances of bagging that TC.

    As I said - and we agree on this - you should treat it as a fun experience and a holiday. However, don't overestimate the CV benefits it may confer.

    On the point about it doing no harm - remember the opportunity costs! If you're finding it hard to get onto an insight day in the UK, you may wish to consider dropping your holiday plans entirely and getting some hard, law-related work experience. Plenty of legal charities hire volunteers on a near-ad hoc basis. Walk into your local job centre, or contact your uni law society to find out more (e.g. some London unis partner with the City of London criminal appeals clinic and the CC Bethnal Green advice center). The CAB is open to volunteers all year round. Try seeing whether you have any contacts that you can use for work shadowing (not interning, just hovering around for a week and seeing what the office environment is like). All of these will be far more useful in the long run than taking the summer off and gaining one talking point for an interview.
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    (Original post by JohanGRK)
    It's a blunt exposition of reality. Summer schools are junk if they're used for CV fodder. I've worked at my uni's summer school, and it's usually populated by Asians and Latin Americans who think that it will give them an edge when applying for jobs back home, or for postgraduate study in the UK. For them, it probably will - any reputable UK uni is an upgrade to their current institution, and, back home, it may help these students advance their careers somewhat. However, going to some law school as a UK undergrad in Asian isn't gonna help your chances of bagging that TC.

    As I said - and we agree on this - you should treat it as a fun experience and a holiday. However, don't overestimate the CV benefits it may confer.

    On the point about it doing no harm - remember the opportunity costs! If you're finding it hard to get onto an insight day in the UK, you may wish to consider dropping your holiday plans entirely and getting some hard, law-related work experience. Plenty of legal charities hire volunteers on a near-ad hoc basis. Walk into your local job centre, or contact your uni law society to find out more (e.g. some London unis partner with the City of London criminal appeals clinic and the CC Bethnal Green advice center). The CAB is open to volunteers all year round. Try seeing whether you have any contacts that you can use for work shadowing (not interning, just hovering around for a week and seeing what the office environment is like). All of these will be far more useful in the long run than taking the summer off and gaining one talking point for an interview.
    I see where you are coming from, NUS would technically be an upgrade being ranked 15th in the world but I take everything you said on board. I have a friend in Singapore who said I can stay with saving £700 and the tuition fees are waived by my university so I just think it is a fantastic opportunity, personally, even if perhaps not as advantageous law wise as I originally thought.

    Thank you for the ideas, I have been applying for insight days and any vacation schemes that are available for first years in the Spring & Summer. I will get into contact with the revelant personnel about such legal charities. I will look at both Nottingham and back in Norwich for the Summer. I did think about CAB but I thought 6hrs+travel might be a stretch, however, I will reconsider as I was keen on the opportunity. I interned at a local firm (I say interned, it was more admin work as it was pre-uni), I will see if I can shadow there and do you know how best to contact courts about shadowing judges?

    Thank you.
 
 
 
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