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    Hey guys, I am currently an undergraduate student in mechanical engineering in France. After completion of my three years degree, I would like to continue my studies in the UK, but do not understand exactly how does it work and where shoul I consider studying.
    First question is about MEng and MSc. I understand that it is the same level (meaning that people don't go to a MS after a MEng). Is that true? And if so, how do i get two years of studies after my degree? My concern is that, if I want to go back to France to work, a five years degree is required to get a job as an engineer, and most masters are only one year, so i would only get 4 year of further studies...
    About choosing my Uni, should I prioritize Oxford and Cambrige no matter what if I get one of them?
    Otherwise, which from Imperial College, Cranfield (which seems to have an impressive energy department), Edinbgrugh (which I've read is good in energy?) or Southampton is more recognized in this particular field? Are there any others?
    Thanks
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    (Original post by JohnShannow)
    Hey guys, I am currently an undergraduate student in mechanical engineering in France. After completion of my three years degree, I would like to continue my studies in the UK, but do not understand exactly how does it work and where shoul I consider studying.
    First question is about MEng and MSc. I understand that it is the same level (meaning that people don't go to a MS after a MEng). Is that true? And if so, how do i get two years of studies after my degree? My concern is that, if I want to go back to France to work, a five years degree is required to get a job as an engineer, and most masters are only one year, so i would only get 4 year of further studies...
    About choosing my Uni, should I prioritize Oxford and Cambrige no matter what if I get one of them?
    Otherwise, which from Imperial College, Cranfield (which seems to have an impressive energy department), Edinbgrugh (which I've read is good in energy?) or Southampton is more recognized in this particular field? Are there any others?
    Thanks
    In the UK, an MEng is equivalent to an MSc. They're not identical as you can only do the MSc is an extra semester and has more "credits", but employers and academic institutions (generally) view them as equivalent. I'm not sure how this would be viewed in France, though.

    What area of the energy industry are you interested in?
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    Thanks for the clarification!
    Well I think I would enjoy either the combustion/engine area or the renewable energy one, especialy solar panels... Also I'm not found of electronics, so if there is a field in energy in which I would not have to deal with them on a daily basis I'll take it.
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    (Original post by JohnShannow)
    Thanks for the clarification!
    Well I think I would enjoy either the combustion/engine area or the renewable energy one, especialy solar panels... Also I'm not found of electronics, so if there is a field in energy in which I would not have to deal with them on a daily basis I'll take it.
    Combustion/engines would more typically be associated with the automotive field than the energy field.

    It's not so much that there are fields where you can avoid electronics, it's the job roles themselves. You can avoid it any in field if you look for the right jobs.

    I believe I should also point out that you can go into the energy industry with your bachelors (or masters) degree in mech eng. Postgraduate degrees in energy engineering aren't widely available in the UK, possibly because the energy industry is such a broad industry. There are some more specific variants, e.g. renewable energy, however, if you are interested in that.
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    (Original post by JohnShannow)
    Hey guys, I am currently an undergraduate student in mechanical engineering in France. After completion of my three years degree, I would like to continue my studies in the UK, but do not understand exactly how does it work and where shoul I consider studying.
    First question is about MEng and MSc. I understand that it is the same level (meaning that people don't go to a MS after a MEng). Is that true? And if so, how do i get two years of studies after my degree? My concern is that, if I want to go back to France to work, a five years degree is required to get a job as an engineer, and most masters are only one year, so i would only get 4 year of further studies...
    About choosing my Uni, should I prioritize Oxford and Cambrige no matter what if I get one of them?
    Otherwise, which from Imperial College, Cranfield (which seems to have an impressive energy department), Edinbgrugh (which I've read is good in energy?) or Southampton is more recognized in this particular field? Are there any others?
    Thanks
    If you are completing an undergraduate engineering degree in France you wouldn't do an MEng afterwards because the MEng is a 4 year integrated undergraduate course. You'd do an MSc.

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    The UK master's should be seen as equivalent to the 2 years of the French program, though in practice it will depend on the company. Some will see it as equivalent, some won't, either because they don't think it's equivalent or because they prefer local graduates. Worst case scenario you can usually get direct entry to M2 from your UK MSc. I would also question whether a master's in energy engineering from the UK would be as applicable to the French market given that their energy sources are quite different.

    Cambridge offers Energy Technologies, while Oxford doesn't, but be aware that for a licence degree they require 16/20 for entry. In general the Scottish universities have a good reputation for energy so Edinburgh would be a good choice. I would also bear in mind that for international recruitment they're generally more interested in a brand name than the quality of the course, so you will need to balance this.
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    (Original post by Helloworld_95)
    I would also question whether a master's in energy engineering from the UK would be as applicable to the French market given that their energy sources are quite different.
    This is like saying:

    "I would also question whether a master's in artificial intelligence from Japan would be as applicable to the UK market given that Japanese artificial intelligence tech is quite different to the UK."

    OR

    "I would also question whether a master's in aerospace engineering from US would be as applicable to the UK market given that the US aerospace sector is far more advanced than the UK"

    In other words, absolute nonsense.
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    (Original post by trapking)
    This is like saying:

    "I would also question whether a master's in artificial intelligence from Japan would be as applicable to the UK market given that Japanese artificial intelligence tech is quite different to the UK."

    OR

    "I would also question whether a master's in aerospace engineering from US would be as applicable to the UK market given that the US aerospace sector is far more advanced than the UK"

    In other words, absolute nonsense.
    Not really. France is highly reliant on nuclear energy and their courses reflect that. The UK on the other hand isn't, which is why you usually have to choose to specialise in nuclear technology or you might be able to do a module on the basics, and only a handful of unis will offer this. If an employer is out to hire you, are they going to look for someone who has been taught about nuclear to a high level or one who has learned the basics, who will you choose? Equally the UK will teach more about wind energy, which is a much more niche source in France.

    As for your examples, yes your Aerospace example is correct to an extent. Most UK programs will only cover a foundation of rocket design, whereas the US programs are more in depth, and the reverse applies for turbine technology. Though there are plenty of other things which would put off a US employer from hiring a UK graduate, even if ITAR wasn't the problem.

    Either way, the bigger problem is that 4 times out of 5, unless the company is very international like Airbus, they will give preference to graduates of local universities. Though yes, going to the kind of universities listed by OP certainly mitigates that.
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    (Original post by Helloworld_95)
    Not really. France is highly reliant on nuclear energy and their courses reflect that. The UK on the other hand isn't, which is why you usually have to choose to specialise in nuclear technology or you might be able to do a module on the basics, and only a handful of unis will offer this. If an employer is out to hire you, are they going to look for someone who has been taught about nuclear to a high level or one who has learned the basics, who will you choose? Equally the UK will teach more about wind energy, which is a much more niche source in France.

    As for your examples, yes your Aerospace example is correct to an extent. Most UK programs will only cover a foundation of rocket design, whereas the US programs are more in depth, and the reverse applies for turbine technology. Though there are plenty of other things which would put off a US employer from hiring a UK graduate, even if ITAR wasn't the problem.

    Either way, the bigger problem is that 4 times out of 5, unless the company is very international like Airbus, they will give preference to graduates of local universities. Though yes, going to the kind of universities listed by OP certainly mitigates that.
    Have you ever interviewed at engineering companies before?

    For someone who hasn't really been in industry before you're putting up a lot of false assumptions. If I did an MSc in say Nuclear Engineering here in the UK it would cover all the basics of nuclear engineering plus any specific specialisations that the said university has which usually feature in the course as options or are already incooperated into the course modules. The skills you gain will be applicable regardless of where you go as the basic principles are always the same.

    For arguments sake say another candidate did a more general MSc in Energy Engineering where they studied a bit of everything but not to great detail. This doesn't render the course useless because as I said a lot of the basic principles regardless of the type of energy are very similar.

    No engineering company will expect you to go into jobs knowing everything about a particular subject/area especially at entry level. You will be trained and yes if you have more relevant knowledge it can add to your advantage however its not the be all end all.
 
 
 
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