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    I'm in year 10, and I know it may seem like it's early to be considering this but in reality it isn't.

    I've got 1 year and a few months left until my final GCSEs
    Then before I know it I'll be doing my a-levels, then going off to uni.

    I'm sure now that I want to do a computer science degree. What a-levels are required for this?
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    (Original post by Cod3tte)
    I'm in year 10, and I know it may seem like it's early to be considering this but in reality it isn't.

    I've got 1 year and a few months left until my final GCSEs
    Then before I know it I'll be doing my a-levels, then going off to uni.

    I'm sure now that I want to do a computer science degree. What a-levels are required for this?
    You could do a computer science A-level but Uni's know that not all schools offer this, so it's not mandatory. You have to include Maths however the other two are more or less a free choice.
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    Theres not much link to computer science but I would recommend doing maths A-levels alongside Computer Science A levels because they link analytically and logically which is a very helping hand to when you pick it for Uni. The other subjects you pick should be based on your interest or something easy e.g. Sociology. but remember to keep your options and A level choices open or you'll not be able to pick certain pathways if you have a sudden change in interest. XD
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    In general, and I am assuming for good unis:

    Essential:

    Mathematics

    Highly desirable:

    Further Mathematics
    Physics

    Useful:

    Chemistry
    Computer Science/Computing
    Generally any STEM A levels

    Some unis aren't bothered about your 3rd or 4th A level, as long as two are within the ones mentioned above.
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    Maths, Further maths, Physics, Computer Science any combination of these should get you into a top uni
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    Maths, basically, but only because it's a prerequisite at quite a few unis and you have the option to study algorithms. Beyond that, there's no real requisites. Other subjects are "nice to have"s but I'd prioritise ones where you can get a higher grade, and have an interest in the subject. Other STEM subjects may or may not touch on Computer Science but only incidentally and only based on what you're going to study, so if you're not interested in them I don't see the point. Their main appeal is they're perceived as "hard" subjects, but they're not the only ones. Just make sure you're not going for easy picks that the university is likely to dismiss on that basis when faced with a broad pool of applicants.
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    As mentioned before I think the best match set is Maths, Further Maths, Computer Science and Physics. Although that doesn't mean you won't be able to get a uni place if you choose a different set.

    That said maths is required for almost all uni courses, and for the top unis further maths is definitely preferred. There is still arguments about how much comp sci is wanted, although as it becomes more widely taught even if for getting onto the course not having it may not be a problem, the way courses are taught are probably going to start assuming more and more knowledge. So I'd recommend it (also if you thin you wanna do it at uni you'll probably find it a fun A level to take.

    Physics is a good science for comp sci, but switching it for chem, biology or any other STEM subject is going to be a good fit, especially if physics isn't your thing as much as another science.

    But fundamentally I'd say choose the subjects you think you'll do well in within the restrictions of those required by unis.
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    (Original post by Faction Paradox)
    As mentioned before I think the best match set is Maths, Further Maths, Computer Science and Physics. Although that doesn't mean you won't be able to get a uni place if you choose a different set.

    That said maths is required for almost all uni courses...
    It's really not though:

    https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5007920

    And there are others beside which aren't listed here that don't need a Maths A-level. I would say it will depend on the university how much math they have in their CS degree.

    I would agree however, that a Maths A-level will give anyone the biggest selection of universities to pick from. I cannot dispute that.

    I would agree with the general list of A-levels on here; the priorities would be Maths, Computer Science and maybe Further Maths or Physics. I would also add useful A-Levels include:

    Geography: Human geography specifically, as with IoT, data science and GIS being hot topics, having a good understanding of Geography will help.

    Psychology: Psychology is pretty essential to fully understand HCI

    Philosophy: Not a common A-Level I know, but it's an important for AI and Cyber Security (for ethical considerations). Trust me that is a huge area right now.

    Art & Design: This can be very useful if a person wants to focus on Front End Development or game development.
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    It widens options, but strictly speaking, if you're going into development, it's not required. It's just the closest proxy the unis have to a pure logic course, and if you go into computer science as such, then it is useful, particularly in domains like cryptography. Hence why universities typically insist upon it. Physics I don't see as being a must, unless you're going into graphics design/animation. I mean you can also do courses like Economics or cognate subjects, since that can be useful for getting into the financial sector/banking, but even then it's not a must.

    Philosophy is a good pick, however I don't know whether A level Philosophy touches on formal logic, which is really the thing you need to be/get good at to grasp how coding works, but yes it touches on other areas that it's not a bad idea to be aware of.

    Really, the complementary A levels besides Maths (or I guess CS) are dependent on what you want to go into specifically, if you know at this early stage in your life. Maths just so happens to be in very high demand for a variety of courses.

    I'd suggest you first speak to a career counselor before making any picks, preferably one that does aptitude testing of some sort, e.g. the Highland Ability Battery test. A proper IQ test, like the Wechsler adult intelligence scale, administered by a psychologist, can also be very useful in gaining an understanding of your cognitive aptitudes, but they're not easy to come by.
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    (Original post by TCA2b)
    It widens options, but strictly speaking, if you're going into development, it's not required.
    I concur completely. I've told people on here before the amount of Math you do in a CS degree and university is variable, from quite a bit to barely any at all. For some courses, an A-Level in Math is overkill considering how much you have to do in your degree.

    Certainly if someone wants to go to university to get a CS degree then get a job as a developer (or pretty much 90% of tech roles), you won't really need much maths in your day to day job.

    Another reason some universities have a math A-Level requirement is that they will want a certain amount of a CS student cohort to stay on for postgrad/research within the university, and they will probably need A-Level maths for academic research in CS. Some universities get huge sums for their CS research programs, so having a supply of willing and able CS undergrads who can move in to research is pretty important to them.
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    Good points as well. I think you can benefit from it for certain roles in Fintech (i.e. "quants"), but for that you really need to be good enough at Maths to take it to PHD level.
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    Maths. Further maths and physics may also be favourable. You don't need computer science at A-Level but ofc if your sixth form offers it, it only makes sense to take it.
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    (Original post by Cod3tte)
    I'm in year 10, and I know it may seem like it's early to be considering this but in reality it isn't.

    I've got 1 year and a few months left until my final GCSEs
    Then before I know it I'll be doing my a-levels, then going off to uni.

    I'm sure now that I want to do a computer science degree. What a-levels are required for this?
    Universities usually require Maths. You don’t even need Computer Science at A-Level but it is useful.
 
 
 
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