GCSE Biology Question (need urgent help please) Watch

Kiko M
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Stuck answering this question: Why is it important to complete the whole course of antibiotics and not just stop once you feel better?
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yeetrdfmbr
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Can you directly quote the question?
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Elisha_shxh
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(Original post by Kiko M)
Stuck answering this question: Why is it important to complete the whole course of antibiotics and not just stop once you feel better?
Just because u are feeling better does not mean that the viruses are gone, if u have not taken the whole course of antibiotics there’s is a chance of there still being a virus
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JessAntonia:)
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If you stop antibiotics prematurely, they may have killed off enough bacteria so you have no more symptoms but you still may have a few left. Those few can then reproduce and you’ll get ill again and/or allow them to mutate to become resistant to the antibiotics which is an issue because then antibiotics can’t treat that new strain. Not finishing courses is one of the contributors to the growing issue of antibiotic resistance in bacteria.
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lucycotterrell
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(Original post by Kiko M)
Stuck answering this question: Why is it important to complete the whole course of antibiotics and not just stop once you feel better?
Because there still will be remaining cells of the virus, if the whole course is not finished then the remaining cells will reproduce and make you ill again
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aleatorio
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Based on the answers written here I just want to stress something: Antibiotics kill bacteria ONLY. They dont target viruses.. Like those that cause the common cold. Don't say viruses.
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aleatorio
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(Original post by lucycotterrell)
Because there still will be remaining cells of the virus, if the whole course is not finished then the remaining cells will reproduce and make you ill again
Antibiotics don't kill viruses . And viruses don't consist of cells, they are DNA/RNA coated in a protein coat and have no cellular structure, so this is not correct.
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SmilingWombat
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(Original post by Kiko M)
Stuck answering this question: Why is it important to complete the whole course of antibiotics and not just stop once you feel better?
If the entire course of antibiotics is not finished it may not kill all the bacteria causing the infection. Remaining bacteria that have been exposed to the antibiotic but not killed by it may mutate and reproduce causing a resistant strain of bacteria to that type of antibiotic. This will have consequences for human health if more strains of resistant bacteria develop because it will make it harder to fight future infections as the antibiotic will be ineffective.
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JessAntonia:)
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(Original post by aleatorio)
Antibiotics don't kill bacteria. And viruses don't consist of cells, they are DNA/RNA coated in a protein coat and have no cellular structure, so this is not correct.
Antibiotics can be bacteriostatic so stop growth of the bacteria (e.g. not allow its cell wall to develop) or bacteriocidal and kill bacteria (such as damaging the cell membrane so all its contents spill out). So no not all antibiotics kill bacteria, but some do have that ability to kill by certain mechanisms or target parts of the bacteria essential roots survival.
(That’s not necessary at GCSE btw, you only need to know about the antibiotic resistance. Being aware of the whole types of antibiotic thing just helps in understanding why certain antibiotics work for certain bacteria dependant on how they work!)😊
I hope we’ve helped you and not confused you by the way!!
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lucycotterrell
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oh lol
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lucycotterrell
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(Original post by aleatorio)
Antibiotics don't kill bacteria. And viruses don't consist of cells, they are DNA/RNA coated in a protein coat and have no cellular structure, so this is not correct.
oh lol
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aleatorio
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(Original post by JessAntonia:))
Antibiotics can be bacteriostatic so stop growth of the bacteria (e.g. not allow its cell wall to develop) or bacteriocidal and kill bacteria (such as damaging the cell membrane so all its contents spill out). So no not all antibiotics kill bacteria, but some do have that ability to kill by certain mechanisms or target parts of the bacteria essential roots survival.
(That’s not necessary at GCSE btw, you only need to know about the antibiotic resistance. Being aware of the whole types of antibiotic thing just helps in understanding why certain antibiotics work for certain bacteria dependant on how they work!)😊
I hope we’ve helped you and not confused you by the way!!
Oh yeah I know sorry that was a typo, I meant to say bacteria - I'm a uni student so I'm not taking GCSEs but it came up on the homepage and I saw people saying antibiotics kill viruses.. Just wanted to clear that up
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JessAntonia:)
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(Original post by aleatorio)
Oh yeah I know sorry that was a typo, I meant to say bacteria - I'm a uni student so I'm not taking GCSEs but it came up on the homepage and I saw people saying antibiotics kill viruses.. Just wanted to clear that up
I have to say I read the first sentence and got super confused! Although yeah they totally don’t affect viruses. Thought I’d do the same thing as you and help clear things up haha. I’m not taking GCSEs either but happen to be covering bacteria right now in my A Level class so thought I might as well help out if I could😂
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