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    Hi,

    Hope everyone is having a productive year. I'm in Y12 and I have been doing three essay-based A-Level subjects and I just wanted to ask for some advice.

    While I like the content, I'm finding it difficult to balance the exam technique (i.e. new essay structure in History) with the knowledge. We learn something and it feels like the older information is pushed out. I've made flashcards for dates, facts, points, etc and while they're useful I feel as if I forget them the next day before I go over them again.

    Has anyone got any experience or advice with learning for essay-based subjects whilst balancing homework/everything else?

    I wanted to do some practice essays just so I can apply the knowledge i think I know properly. I can't speak from experience but I was thinking that Science/Maths subjects have exam papers with mark schemes with 'clear cut' answers (for 2/3 mark questions, etc) whereas it's more subjective with English, History, etc so it would be harder to self-mark and continually ask teachers to mark them on top of everything else, etc.

    I'd love to make mind-maps but I'm not particularly neat, unless I could do them on the computer with a program.

    Thanks for reading and best of luck to everyone.
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    (Original post by StudentOfThings)
    Hi,

    Hope everyone is having a productive year. I'm in Y12 and I have been doing three essay-based A-Level subjects and I just wanted to ask for some advice.

    While I like the content, I'm finding it difficult to balance the exam technique (i.e. new essay structure in History) with the knowledge. We learn something and it feels like the older information is pushed out. I've made flashcards for dates, facts, points, etc and while they're useful I feel as if I forget them the next day before I go over them again.

    Has anyone got any experience or advice with learning for essay-based subjects whilst balancing homework/everything else?

    I wanted to do some practice essays just so I can apply the knowledge i think I know properly. I can't speak from experience but I was thinking that Science/Maths subjects have exam papers with mark schemes with 'clear cut' answers (for 2/3 mark questions, etc) whereas it's more subjective with English, History, etc so it would be harder to self-mark and continually ask teachers to mark them on top of everything else, etc.

    I'd love to make mind-maps but I'm not particularly neat, unless I could do them on the computer with a program.

    Thanks for reading and best of luck to everyone.
    As someone who got an A in A level history, and B in A level English Literature, I think I might be able to help.

    The main thing I did for history was to learn a set way of writing for each module. This is most useful when in the modules that cover a wide range of subjects - for example the OCR A level history on Russia and its Rulers 1855-1964. If you know the set three/four paragraphs that need to go into each, then all you need to do in the exam is re-arrange their order to suit the question. I also found revising for even minor facts with websites like Kahoot (which can let you take the quizzes on your own as well as competing against friends and classmates) allows for a deeper understanding.

    But really it's about knowing how to write it rather than what ot write. (e.g. I knew what I was writing content wise, but not the structure. And it made the difference of being on a B or an E all year)
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    (Original post by StudentOfThings)
    Hi,

    Hope everyone is having a productive year. I'm in Y12 and I have been doing three essay-based A-Level subjects and I just wanted to ask for some advice.

    While I like the content, I'm finding it difficult to balance the exam technique (i.e. new essay structure in History) with the knowledge. We learn something and it feels like the older information is pushed out. I've made flashcards for dates, facts, points, etc and while they're useful I feel as if I forget them the next day before I go over them again.

    Has anyone got any experience or advice with learning for essay-based subjects whilst balancing homework/everything else?

    I wanted to do some practice essays just so I can apply the knowledge i think I know properly. I can't speak from experience but I was thinking that Science/Maths subjects have exam papers with mark schemes with 'clear cut' answers (for 2/3 mark questions, etc) whereas it's more subjective with English, History, etc so it would be harder to self-mark and continually ask teachers to mark them on top of everything else, etc.

    I'd love to make mind-maps but I'm not particularly neat, unless I could do them on the computer with a program.

    Thanks for reading and best of luck to everyone.
    Estels answer is good.


    You need one set of revision notes and you cna either write these around events or themes.

    Mind maps and timelines are good.

    The second half of your revision is based on practicing essay questions.
    From every angle, so you know what the question says and various ways to marshall your argument. Once you study exam papers and collect them all then you realise theres a method and you simply have to get better at analysing, constructing fluffing out and then adding good evaluation plus the extras.

    I believe there are mind mapping programs, but try doing them in pencil on a big sheet and then coping them out again.
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    (Original post by EstelOfTheEyrie)
    As someone who got an A in A level history, and B in A level English Literature, I think I might be able to help.

    The main thing I did for history was to learn a set way of writing for each module. This is most useful when in the modules that cover a wide range of subjects - for example the OCR A level history on Russia and its Rulers 1855-1964. If you know the set three/four paragraphs that need to go into each, then all you need to do in the exam is re-arrange their order to suit the question. I also found revising for even minor facts with websites like Kahoot (which can let you take the quizzes on your own as well as competing against friends and classmates) allows for a deeper understanding.

    But really it's about knowing how to write it rather than what ot write. (e.g. I knew what I was writing content wise, but not the structure. And it made the difference of being on a B or an E all year)
    Hi, thanks for replying. I really agree with your last point - I think the structure is the hardest bit. Finding the criteria for essays (as in, if there's a change in something over a period of time then how would you measure that change) is really hard at the moment, but hopefully it'll get better with more work.

    I'll definitely try Kahoot more often - I don't use it enough!

    Thanks again.

    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Estels answer is good.


    You need one set of revision notes and you cna either write these around events or themes.

    Mind maps and timelines are good.

    The second half of your revision is based on practicing essay questions.
    From every angle, so you know what the question says and various ways to marshall your argument. Once you study exam papers and collect them all then you realise theres a method and you simply have to get better at analysing, constructing fluffing out and then adding good evaluation plus the extras.

    I believe there are mind mapping programs, but try doing them in pencil on a big sheet and then coping them out again.
    Thanks for the advice. I'm making a good bank of notes - it's just learning them now really.

    It's hard to practice questions really because you can't mark them yourself unlike some subjects, but I'll do my best to do more. Thanks for your advice, and I'll try to do more mindmaps.
 
 
 

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