Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

Should depression count as a disability? watch

Announcements
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Depression can be classified as a disability if it is long term (usually over a year) and has a substantial negative impact on your ability to do normal daily living activities.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Why are so many people assuming that "disabled" has to be a lifelong thing and once classed as it it cannot be reversed?

    I think you'll find in the US and UK that disabilities can come and go, they're not necessarily permanent. In which case depression can count so long as it has enough of an effect on your life for a certain period of time. Once you recover, you are no longer classed as "disabled".
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    i mean if it is that serious then yeh i guess , but tbh it can be easily helped in many ways so i say it only counts as a disability if it has been with you for more than 2 or 3 years constantly 24/7.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Harjot)
    That's not very nice.

    The point that I was (very sarcastically) trying to illustrate is that disabling != disability. One is temporal/present, one is not necessarily.

    Is it not also strange to try to project physical and mental issues equally/with the same terminology?
    I think you might have the wrong idea about what disability is? An impairment that has a substantial or long term negative effect on your ability to do normal daily activities qualifies as a disability.

    A lot of mental illnesses (including depression) can be debilitating, and are classed as disabilities if they have long term and/or substantial effects on a person’s ability to function. Physical or mental.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    I think it depends on the extent of the effects it has on the person.

    Moreover, I think regardless of whether a person's depression would be considered as a disability or not, there needs to be a much greater focus on helping people out of their unbalance and working with them compassionately so that they can be helped up on their feet again. The focus, more so with this government, seems to be on making spending cuts to save money and to get people out, shoving them into the deep end. I'm not saying saving money is a bad thing, but our priorities need to be to help the sufferers with compassion, not bleeding them dry or putting more pressure on them.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Harjot)
    Is it not also strange to try to project physical and mental issues equally/with the same terminology?
    Can they not be equally disabling?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    Why are so many people assuming that "disabled" has to be a lifelong thing and once classed as it it cannot be reversed?

    I think you'll find in the US and UK that disabilities can come and go, they're not necessarily permanent. In which case depression can count so long as it has enough of an effect on your life for a certain period of time. Once you recover, you are no longer classed as "disabled".
    Exactly, I see depression akin to breaking your legs and needing crutches for some time. I don't believe this is classed as a disability.

    If you plan on leaving depression untreated for the remainder of your life, some of the fault must be placed on yourself.

    Of course, if diagnosed and a course of treatment is provided, then it'd be reasonable for an employer to make reasonable adjustments, just as in the case of the broken leg.

    (Original post by cat_mac)
    I think you might have the wrong idea about what disability is? An impairment that has a substantial or long term negative effect on your ability to do normal daily activities qualifies as a disability.

    A lot of mental illnesses (including depression) can be debilitating, and are classed as disabilities if they have long term and/or substantial effects on a person’s ability to function. Physical or mental.
    Sure, but the whole point of this thread is to discuss the should, not the governmental definition (https://www.gov.uk/when-mental-healt...mes-disability).

    Depression is also an extremely encompassing term.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    Can they not be equally disabling?
    No, it is rare for a mental illness to stop your legs from working in the same way that paralysis would, and vice-versa.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Harjot)
    Sure, but the whole point of this thread is to discuss the should, not the governmental definition (https://www.gov.uk/when-mental-healt...mes-disability).

    Depression is also an extremely encompassing term.
    It already is classed as a disability in the UK and someone else linked something about it in the US too. All cases of illness need to be assessed before it is classed as disability, I don’t think anyone’s suggesting people self identify as disabled because they’re going through a rough patch.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cat_mac)
    It already is classed as a disability in the UK and someone else linked something about it in the US too. All cases of illness need to be assessed before it is classed as disability, I don’t think anyone’s suggesting people self identify as disabled because they’re going through a rough patch.
    Sure, but this thread is about Should depression count as a disability, not whether it is already classified as one.

    Indeed, everything should be assessed.

    I feel like people are more obsessed with the labels, than the actual support.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Not if it is treatable
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Harjot)
    No, it is rare for a mental illness to stop your legs from working in the same way that paralysis would, and vice-versa.
    So your brain not working right wouldn’t effect your ability to work? Loss of focus, memory problems, lack of energy and motivation is going to be a big problem in work. While someone who doesn’t have the use of their legs can have excellent brains and work without issue. Both are disabled because their impairments stop them or make it more difficult to complete daily tasks.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Reue)
    Not if it is treatable
    Disability is about ability to carry out normal daily tasks, not whether your illness has treatment.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cat_mac)
    Disability is about ability to carry out normal daily tasks, not whether your illness has treatment.
    Ok, great.

    Doesn't change my answer to whether this one should could as a disability.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Reue)
    Ok, great.

    Doesn't change my answer to whether this one should could as a disability.
    You can be in treatment for years and never be recovered. Do those people not deserve the support provided to disabled? Their day to day life is a struggle but they aren’t disabled because they have treatment even though it isn’t working for them?

    It’s just totally bizarre to me, to write off all the people who suffer with depression, no matter the severity of their illness. To just say “no, they can have treatment” when therapy and antidepressants involve a lot of guess work and trial and error. It can still control and ruin your life for an indefinite time period, whether you’re getting treatment or not.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cat_mac)
    You can be in treatment for years and never be recovered. Do those people not deserve the support provided to disabled? Their day to day life is a struggle but they aren’t disabled because they have treatment even though it isn’t working for them?
    If treatment doesn't work for them then they are not treatable and so would be classed as disabled by my definition.

    (Original post by cat_mac)
    Y
    It’s just totally bizarre to me, to write off all the people who suffer with depression, no matter the severity of their illness. To just say “no, they can have treatment” when therapy and antidepressants involve a lot of guess work and trial and error. It can still control and ruin your life for an indefinite time period, whether you’re getting treatment or not.
    I think you've misjudged my point. I specially said 'treatable', not 'test treatment and if it doesnt work then screw it'.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    i don't see it as a illness its due to peoples own self belief and 'trapping' themsleves and they are able to get out of it. Disability is more of permanant (correct me if i wrong xd
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cat_mac)
    It already is a disability.

    “The Equality Act says you have a disability if you have a physical or mental impairment that has a substantial, adverse, and long term effect on your ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.”

    If your depression fits those characteristics and an employer “doesn’t recognise it” then they’re breaking the law.

    An illness won’t be a disability in all cases of the illness. Mental or physical. If it fits the requirements then it is considered a disability.
    I was claiming benefits when I was 16-17 due to having generalized anxiety disorder and depression. I dropped out of secondary school after about 3 months due to my problems, so from the age of around 12-16 I did my school work online at home. I got 0 gcses when I took them and I got pissed off about that, I felt restricted because I'm not stupid and I wanted to learn but I couldn't, so I overcame my difficulties and now I'm an apprentice
    Now that I'm older (only really changed in the last year) I can live a relatively normal life, I do however occasionally get depressed and anxious still.

    I did personally get a bit of money (including backpay) due to my illnesses, which did pay for my car insurance and fuel, but from what I went through it isn't about the money AT ALL. Getting my car also catapulted me into getting motivated, because I started college in September after ncs, and it was a lot easier being able to drive there instead of having 45 minutes of a stressful bus journey.

    Also in college, I can just go sit in the car and disconnect from the stress for a while at break time, which helps A TON. Plus if we get let out early I can just leave right away.

    I never wanted to 'sit' on benefits like some people do, I want to pay back by working now, so effectively benefits actually pushed me into getting somewhere with my life, considering it allowed me to run my car, get to college etc...

    Long story short, from me to the person reading, if you're depressed/anxious about something, don't let it control your life, you only live once, so make the most of it and go get what you want! I remember crying last April to my mum about not being able to live a normal life. I was pretty much at rock bottom and I made something out of it.

    Sorry this is long, but it's why I believe benefits should be given to people who have long term depression/anxiety.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    no
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Harjot)
    No, it is rare for a mental illness to stop your legs from working in the same way that paralysis would, and vice-versa.
    Depression can be more disabling
    Those who are paralysed can still lead a normal life with the help of a wheelchair.
    People with severe clinical depression have nothing to aid them in getting out of bed and get out and about.

    (Original post by Ammz_123)
    i don't see it as a illness its due to peoples own self belief and 'trapping' themsleves and they are able to get out of it. Disability is more of permanant (correct me if i wrong xd
    Depression is caused by a chemical imbalance, nothing to do with beliefs.
    Depression can be life long.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: April 21, 2018
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.