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    Hi, I have my driving test on Saturday, my instructor hasn't had me do any practise with the sat nav yet, is this normal? Is it hard to get used to the sat nav instructions?! Help!
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    If you've got a lesson coming up before then, ask to use it. But it isn't rocket science. It calls out a direction and how long before you take that direction, you do as it says. In some cases it'll even carry you through lane discipline as well. I don't think anyone is going to ever fail a test from misunderstanding the sat nav lol, as long as you at least try to follow it you're probably fine. Personally I prefer it back when they'd just tell you to follow signs. I take a sat nav to/from my sister's every time I visit despite the fact I should know the way by now and I still make a mistake once in a while. Last time I visited I followed signs home and it was way better. Sat Navs are "easy" to follow, but every now and then they throw a curve ball; one of which cost me 65 quid.
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    First off, even if you go the wrong way when following a satnav or signs in the independent drive section of the test, provided you go the wrong way correctly there is no fault. If you end up in a lane that's left turn only, mirrors, signal and go left. Do not try and correct a mistake (e.g. you should have been going straight ahead). The examiner or satnav will re-route to get you back on track.

    The satnav used in the driving test is a TomTom - the directions are clear enough although sometimes does have some quirks like "cross the roundabout, 2nd exit" when the 2nd exit is more like 2pm. It will give directions in advance based on speed, e.g. in 300 yards turn left, then as you get closer to the junction it will repeat the direction for you. So you're getting more information than you would from your instructor or examiner.

    Most of the time it is obvious and if there's some doubt then the examiner will clarify the direction to go. For example, there's a roundabout here where the satnav says take the 4th exit, the signs and instructors always tell pupils take the 3rd exit so examiners jump in with the direction to go.

    It will sometimes chain directions together - e.g. cross the roundabout 2nd exit and then turn left. You might think by that it's an immediate left turn, but if you glance at the satnav screen you might see the left turn is 300+ yards away. Again examiner will normally clarify this.

    Use the satnav by listening to the directions and GLANCING at the screen - the top row will show the direction you're going and the distance to that direction. Do not stare at the satnav as you will likely drift out of lane.

    As said above, it isn't rocket science.

    Also remember 1 in 5 tests are still asked to follow road signs for the independent drive. My experience is much more - 50% of tests have been following signs instead of satnav. Just luck though, and you should have more probability of being asked to follow the satnav directions.
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    How did you get on? Good I hope.

    I got this late but would have had little to add. Satnavs are mostly reliable but I guess we've all heard some of the dafter stories of being sent a dumb way. It's not just the map. GPS can go screwy. Getting a good position depends on the spread of satellites in the sky. If they are close together it loses accuracy. It looks for the best ones but the signal can be blocked by buildings or trees. It may then either freeze or bounce around until it finds itself. This could lead to confusing instruction unless you're aware of it.

    I would recommend any satnav user to understand more how they work and therefore where they go wrong so you then know when to ignore. There's a lot of info via google. Can't remember site details but can dig some up if anyone interested.

    I've seen screw ups. Example going down a one way (the wrong way) because satnav says you can. That was an experienced driver.

    All the best and cheers
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    (Original post by JMaris)
    How did you get on? Good I hope.

    I got this late but would have had little to add. Satnavs are mostly reliable but I guess we've all heard some of the dafter stories of being sent a dumb way. It's not just the map. GPS can go screwy. Getting a good position depends on the spread of satellites in the sky. If they are close together it loses accuracy. It looks for the best ones but the signal can be blocked by buildings or trees. It may then either freeze or bounce around until it finds itself. This could lead to confusing instruction unless you're aware of it.

    I would recommend any satnav user to understand more how they work and therefore where they go wrong so you then know when to ignore. There's a lot of info via google. Can't remember site details but can dig some up if anyone interested.

    I've seen screw ups. Example going down a one way (the wrong way) because satnav says you can. That was an experienced driver.

    All the best and cheers
    Absolutely correct for the real world when you're setting destinations and relying on the directions.

    To help any others who come across this thread specifically about the driving test, the satnav routes have all been recorded by an examiner when the routes were being created. This is then copied across to all the satnavs in the test centre. So there's no programming to be done at the start of the test and there's no chance of being directed the wrong way down a one-way street for example, unless the examiner did it when recording the route!

    In the test you're following directions from the satnav which itself is following a pre-programmed route. What could possibly go wrong?! As I mentioned above, if it looks like something's gone wrong then the examiner will step in.

    However if, for example, you think you're turning next road right which is a no-entry the examiner wouldn't step in until last moment to prevent you going there and thus failing the test (remember the satnav is programmed so wouldn't be trying to trick you into going down that no-entry). So whilst you have to listen to and glance at the satnav for directions, you also need to look at road signs and markings to make sure that where you think you're going is correct.
 
 
 
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