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Ex making false accusations watch

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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    Well, I'll be honest, the reason I laughed is because you made it seem as if it were a banal letter you were helpfully passing on. Clubcard points which she'd left behind or something. The reason I laughed loud, and irl loud (so you know), is because I knew that the letter would be a lot more than you were letting on, and I was right. I do apologise for that ejaculation of merriment, though.

    Coppers are not necessarily reasonable and sensitive people. Their agreeing with you means very little. I repeat my advice: de-escalate. Move on. No more frenzied letter writing over a lost relationship.
    A lot more than I was letting on? My OP says "I called her out for breaking a promise, there was no harsh language or threats". The post you laughed at says "Literally all it said was that the reason we didn't work is because she couldn't keep a promise. No harsh language, no threats, no asking for her back.". I don't see how that's a lot more than I was letting on, unless your ability to read just failed you at the start and your fingers work faster than your brain...

    I'm not going to contact her directly, I just want to know what can legally be done for her a) wasting police time and b) causing me distress. There was never any "frenzied letter writing" I don't know what rom-com you've been watching recently or what ****ed up things you've sent to ex's, but it was a polite, reasonable "I think this was the issue". You really need to stop being such an ass an making random assumptions about strangers.
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    (Original post by Taka345)
    Try and report false allegations to the police but don't report it to the same police officers. They're probably those ones who wanna be seen as some chivalrous saviour ugh.

    Also do it calmly to show the difference between you and her in her full time blown exaggeration of the incident. (I would do this because I absolutely despise false accusations with ppl getting away with it)
    Is there any particular term/buzzword, or should I just ring 101 and say I've had the police at my house after a false allegation and would like to report it? Any idea what the process is after that?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Is there any particular term/buzzword, or should I just ring 101 and say I've had the police at my house after a false allegation and would like to report it? Any idea what the process is after that?
    If you do report it I'm not sure but it may go through a court or a fine process. You can either prolong it into this situation to justify your reason or just leave it and put it to bed so it doesn't harm you anymore (also look up on google the process it defenitely has it)
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    A lot more than I was letting on? My OP says "I called her out for breaking a promise, there was no harsh language or threats". The post you laughed at says "Literally all it said was that the reason we didn't work is because she couldn't keep a promise. No harsh language, no threats, no asking for her back.". I don't see how that's a lot more than I was letting on, unless your ability to read just failed you at the start and your fingers work faster than your brain...
    I won't lie. I only read the first paragraph. In that, you only said you gave her a letter. As I didn't know about that ("breaking a promise" stuff in paragraph 2, I still have a right to feel gleeful for knowing it would be more than a banal letter, as paragraph 1 alone suggested it would be. From my POV, from what I knew at the time, I felt pretty good and for an excellent reason.

    I'm not going to contact her directly, I just want to know what can legally be done for her a) wasting police time and b) causing me distress. There was never any "frenzied letter writing" I don't know what rom-com you've been watching recently or what ****ed up things you've sent to ex's, but it was a polite, reasonable "I think this was the issue". You really need to stop being such an ass an making random assumptions about strangers.
    Says the one who assumed I watch rom-coms. I don't.

    It is not reasonable to send a letter to an ex, a couple weeks after a break-up, "so here is a list of what you've done wrong ..." At best, it's patronising. At worst, it's creepy. The way you're ranting here with me, solely because I had a giggle, suggests it could be the latter.

    Joking aside, I know about this area of law and I have clients I see every day who ask about this sort of stuff. You are best off just leaving this; not engaging in a tit-for-tat. You're a young adult, I suppose, and this is not a good use of your time or energy. It is certainly not going to be very good for you if you end up worse out of this. If she's prone to lying, and you back her into a corner, what else might she say? Just let her be and find another fish in the sea.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    I won't lie. I only read the first paragraph. In that, you only said you gave her a letter. As I didn't know about that ("breaking a promise" stuff in paragraph 2, I still have a right to feel gleeful for knowing it would be more than a banal letter, as paragraph 1 alone suggested it would be. From my POV, from what I knew at the time, I felt pretty good and for an excellent reason.

    Says the one who assumed I watch rom-coms. I don't.

    It is not reasonable to send a letter to an ex, a couple weeks after a break-up, "so here is a list of what you've done wrong ..." At best, it's patronising. At worst, it's creepy. The way you're ranting here with me, solely because I had a giggle, suggests it could be the latter.

    Joking aside, I know about this area of law and I have clients I see every day who ask about this sort of stuff. You are best off just leaving this; not engaging in a tit-for-tat. You're a young adult, I suppose, and this is not a good use of your time or energy. It is certainly not going to be very good for you if you end up worse out of this. If she's prone to lying, and you back her into a corner, what else might she say? Just let her be and find another fish in the sea.
    So you're a moron who replies to something they haven't read? Great. God knows why you think that's an excellent reason to feel pretty good...

    If you'd read it just one more time she literally told me to send it to her. I wanted to talk in person, she wanted to talk online, neither of us wanted to do what the other did so I suggested a letter and she told me to send it to her. It took a couple of weeks to get round to writing and sending it.

    As to whether or not it is a good use of my time or energy is surely up for me to decide. I don't like people abusing the law and wasting police time, so to me it might be worth more energy than it is to you.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    So you're a moron who replies to something they haven't read? Great. God knows why you think that's an excellent reason to feel pretty good...

    If you'd read it just one more time she literally told me to send it to her. I wanted to talk in person, she wanted to talk online, neither of us wanted to do what the other did so I suggested a letter and she told me to send it to her. It took a couple of weeks to get round to writing and sending it.

    As to whether or not it is a good use of my time or energy is surely up for me to decide. I don't like people abusing the law and wasting police time, so to me it might be worth more energy than it is to you.
    Hahaha, so you don't like people wasting police time, so you're gonna phone the police about an unactionable accusation and double the amount of their time wasted? OK ...

    I gave you my advice -- which comes from someone who knows about this area of law and not kids telling you to Google the process. Whether or not you take it, at the end of the day, I don't get paid either way.

    Best of luck with it all.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    The way you're ranting here with me, solely because I had a giggle, suggests it could be the latter.
    And yes, having had the police turn up at my door in the middle of the night and say I've been accused of something I haven't done, is going to put me in a bit of a ranty mood when someone then laughs at it. I don't know if you've ever been accused of a crime or had the police knocking on your door much, but it's a first for me and I can assure you it doesn't exactly lead to a relaxed state of mind.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    Hahaha, so you don't like people wasting police time, so you're gonna phone the police about an unactionable accusation and double the amount of their time wasted? OK ...

    I gave you my advice -- which comes from someone who knows about this area of law and not kids telling you to Google the process. Whether or not you take it, at the end of the day, I don't get paid either way.

    Best of luck with it all.
    Well that's why I'm posting here, to know if there's any action that can be taken or if it will never go anywhere. The fact you've said it isn't a worthwhile use of my time indicates there is a course of action that can be taken, and therefore if the police are following up on a genuine problem it's not wasting their time...
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    Sending a letter weeks after you broke up is creepy.

    You can't claim to know her state of mind. If she genuinely felt threatened then she is entitled to report it. The fact the bizzies actually came and had words despite not taking further action says that perhaps you ought to drop it and move on.

    Presumably the bizzies now know the full details. If there was a case for her to answer re wasting time, they'd do it without your direction.

    TL;DR - learn the lesson and move on.
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    (Original post by gjd800)
    Sending a letter weeks after you broke up is creepy.

    You can't claim to know her state of mind. If she genuinely felt threatened then she is entitled to report it. The fact the bizzies actually came and had words despite not taking further action says that perhaps you ought to drop it and move on.

    Presumably the bizzies now know the full details. If there was a case for her to answer re wasting time, they'd do it without your direction.

    TL;DR - learn the lesson and move on.
    She literally told me to. I don't see how I can make this clearer.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    She literally told me to. I don't see how I can make this clearer.
    Yes, but it is the content and style of said letter that dictates the appropriate response, not what she said in the initial instance. If the bizzies thought that she was being silly they would have told her that and not bothered you. They've clearly tried to de-escalate like a sane person. Just nurse your dented pride and move on. This is all a bit pathetic (I don't say that to have a go at you).
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    She literally told me to. I don't see how I can make this clearer.
    I thought she agreed to receive the letter a few weeks in advance, and it took you a few weeks to write it. Did you inform her that you were going to turn up, or ask her permission to do so, closer to the event?

    Not that it matters that she agreed, distally or proximally. The way you expressed yourself (which is very intense from speaking to you over this short time) could have caused her to worry for her safety. Namely, the fact you had the focus to write a letter, over the period of a few weeks, for a relationship you considered lost, is quite peculiar and, I feel, intimidating.

    Being rejected, dismissed, humiliated can cause you to lose some perspective. Just get back on the wagon, shag a few other people, and enjoy your life. Don't look for revenge.
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    (Original post by gjd800)
    Yes, but it is the content and style of said letter that dictates the appropriate response, not what she said in the initial instance. If the bizzies thought that she was being silly they would have told her that and not bothered you. They've clearly tried to de-escalate like a sane person. Just nurse your dented pride and move on. This is all a bit pathetic (I don't say that to have a go at you).
    Wanting something done about a person who utilises the police for her own personal vendetta is pathetic?
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    There's a big difference betwixt her agreeing to receive a letter at the house (which she might have said to shut you up) and her asking you to write her a letter. Worlds apart.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Well that's why I'm posting here, to know if there's any action that can be taken or if it will never go anywhere. The fact you've said it isn't a worthwhile use of my time indicates there is a course of action that can be taken, and therefore if the police are following up on a genuine problem it's not wasting their time...
    There is absolutely no way anything would come from you reporting it, the police will say the dealt with the incident correctly and I would say they have, they heard her side which she will have told in a way to make it worse and your side and you will have done the opposite.

    There’s absolutely no way any type of prosecution is in the public interest.

    If it keeps happening then contact a lawyer as at that point something may be able to be done.
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    (Original post by gjd800)
    There's a big difference betwixt her agreeing to receive a letter at the house (which she might have said to shut you up) and her asking you to write her a letter. Worlds apart.
    It was concluded it was a sensible middle ground between her wanting to talk online and me wanting to talk in person. This has all already been mentioned.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Wanting something done about a person who utilises the police for her own personal vendetta is pathetic?
    You wrote a letter that assigned blame to her and that she found intimidating. Maybe she overreacted, but you need to shoulder some responsibility and move on.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    It was concluded it was a sensible middle ground between her wanting to talk online and me wanting to talk in person. This has all already been mentioned.
    Yeah - if you stepped back a bit you'd see that she didn't feel in control/safe enough to talk in person, and you could see how such a letter might be viewed. Honestly man, you need to chalk it to experience, move on, don't get drawn in again.
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    (Original post by gjd800)
    You wrote a letter that assigned blame to her and that she found intimidating. Maybe she overreacted, but you need to shoulder some responsibility and move on.
    I need to shoulder responsibility for wanting to be a mature adult and learn from a mistake? I didn't completely blame her, I'm just assuming that's the part she massively over reacted to. As mentioned, I'm not prepared to just move on from someone abusing the police for their own vendetta.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I need to shoulder responsibility for wanting to be a mature adult and learn from a mistake? I didn't completely blame her, I'm just assuming that's the part she massively over reacted to. As mentioned, I'm not prepared to just move on from someone abusing the police for their own vendetta.
    You don't know that she wasn't legitimately intimidated. Well, unless you are psychic or there is still more to this than you are disclosing, anyway.
 
 
 
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