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Applying to undergraduate Medicine as a graduate as opposed to the GEM route? watch

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    Was interested in seeing everyone’s opinions on whether your chances of getting into medicine as a graduate are increased when applying for the undergrad medicine course as opposed to GEM?
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    They're both undergrad degrees. And yes you stand a higher chance of getting into an A100 course vs a GEP: more places available and less competition.
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    They're both undergrad degrees. And yes you stand a higher chance of getting into an A100 course vs a GEP: more places available and less competition.
    But when applying for the conventional 5 year course, would graduates be in a better position than school-leavers? I hope so!
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    They're both undergrad degrees. And yes you stand a higher chance of getting into an A100 course vs a GEP: more places available and less competition.
    Funding issues though ? (Probably wrongly... not my area... )

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    (Original post by ashaaaal)
    But when applying for the conventional 5 year course, would graduates be in a better position than school-leavers? I hope so!
    Chances are you would be, simply by virtue of the fact there are more places. However, doing a standard undergraduate medicine course as a graduate is very expensive, you'd have to pay all the tuition fees yourself
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    The main question is can you afford it? This is something you'll need to have a certain answer for before you start because it would be heartbreaking to get to 4th year and realise you can't pay your tuition fees anymore.
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    They're both undergrad degrees. And yes you stand a higher chance of getting into an A100 course vs a GEP: more places available and less competition.
    Maybe that varies by Uni?

    Leicester don't run a separate Grad Entry program now, but last time they did (for 2014 entry) 60% of grad applicants received an interview and 84% of those interviewed were made an offer. That was considerably less competitive than for undergrad in the same year with 42% gaining an interview and 47% of those interviewed receiving an offer.

    For current applicants last year's (2017 entry) figures for Grads applying for the 5 year course shows 32% receiving an interview, and 63% of those interviewed receiving an offer. That compares with 56% of undergrad applicants gaining an interview, and 60% of those interviewed receiving an offer. So, more difficult for grads to get an interview, but when they do only a marginal difference in the offer rate.

    The Leicester stats are here: https://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/me...ons-statistics
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    If you have good A-level marks, a predicted first or 2:1 in a relevant degree and a decent UKCAT score, then you definitely have more chances. Especially in the interview. If you've been studying biochemistry for example for 3 years you will definitely convince people more in the interview because you'll know much more about how some diseases work and you'll be able to show your passion through knowledge. However, If you don't have A levels and you only have a degree, even if you get 100% in your degree many universities will instantly reject your application. Same goes with UKCAT score.
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    Me. I'm self-funding through scholarships and working. My plan is to work for 3 years as software engineer post graduation then I'm gonna apply to undergrad medicine. Whilst working I'm gonna self-study A-Level Biology and Chemistry. Got A*ABB at A-Levels but in the wrong subjects so I'm gonna do Bio and Chem through distance learning. My first cycle will be in 2022, a long way away yes but it takes time to prepare a strong medical application. Heck even some kids start preparing at 12 because of asian parents. xD
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    (Original post by marioslemon)
    If you have good A-level marks, a predicted first or 2:1 in a relevant degree and a decent UKCAT score, then you definitely have more chances. Especially in the interview. If you've been studying biochemistry for example for 3 years you will definitely convince people more in the interview because you'll know much more about how some diseases work and you'll be able to show your passion through knowledge. However, If you don't have A levels and you only have a degree, even if you get 100% in your degree many universities will instantly reject your application. Same goes with UKCAT score.
    That may possibly apply to Oxbridge and a few others, but most Med Schools don't ask science questions or anything requiring medical knowledge. A lot use MMI to test personal attributes and general understanding of what a medical career entails.
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    (Original post by meddad)
    That may possibly apply to Oxbridge and a few others, but most Med Schools don't ask science questions or anything requiring medical knowledge. A lot use MMI to test personal attributes and general understanding of what a medical career entails.
    Yeah true, except if its a traditional interview like in Southampton and other universities in the UK. My point it that a degree is always a plus but in everything else in your application needs to be good. For example a first class degree is nothing with a bad UKCAT score.
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    (Original post by marioslemon)
    Yeah true, except if its a traditional interview like in Southampton and other universities in the UK. My point it that a degree is always a plus but in everything else in your application needs to be good. For example a first class degree is nothing with a bad UKCAT score.
    I agree that you can't get an interview without all round good stats in academics, ukcat etc.

    However many Med Schools score grads and non-grads separately before interview. This means the competition is grad versus grad, so the degree is no advantage. Or else ukcat is the main criteria, again no advantage - in fact there is often a higher ukcat threshold for grads (Newcastle for example). Again, at Leicester (for example) 1 in 3 grad applicants reached interview stage but 56% of undergrads were given interviews.

    Once at interview, I'm not aware that grads perform significantly better. At Leicester 63% of grads interviewed last year were successful and 60% of undergrads. This isn't what I would expect, but that's what the stats tell us.

    So, just making the point that at many Med Schools a degree isn't a plus. In fact it may put you in a more competitive environment when applying for the 5 year course.

    I guess, though, it will vary according to Med School.
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    (Original post by meddad)
    I agree that you can't get an interview without all round good stats in academics, ukcat etc.

    However many Med Schools score grads and non-grads separately before interview. This means the competition is grad versus grad, so the degree is no advantage. Or else ukcat is the main criteria, again no advantage - in fact there is often a higher ukcat threshold for grads (Newcastle for example). Again, at Leicester (for example) 1 in 3 grad applicants reached interview stage but 56% of undergrads were given interviews.

    Once at interview, I'm not aware that grads perform significantly better. At Leicester 63% of grads interviewed last year were successful and 60% of undergrads. This isn't what I would expect, but that's what the stats tell us.

    So, just making the point that at many Med Schools a degree isn't a plus. In fact it may put you in a more competitive environment when applying for the 5 year course.

    I guess, though, it will vary according to Med School.
    I didn't know that it was grad vs grad and undergrad vs undergrad. Good to know though because this explains why I got rejected by all my 4 choices and I am a grad. Thank you! This clears a lot of things in my head
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    (Original post by marioslemon)
    I didn't know that it was grad vs grad and undergrad vs undergrad. Good to know though because this explains why I got rejected by all my 4 choices and I am a grad. Thank you! This clears a lot of things in my head
    I don't know for sure that it's the same everywhere. I know quite a lot about undergrad entry in most English Med Schools (other than London and Oxbridge) because I researched it when my daughter applied - I know less about Grad entry.

    I guess I'm most familiar with Leicester where my daughter studies. In their scoring, for Home/EU applicants to get to interview they assess graduates, achieved A level applicants (eg: gap year) and school leavers all separately. So there are three different scoring systems with three different cut off thresholds.

    There's a TSR thread every year where myself and one or two others try to give advice to undergrads on where best to apply, but our knowledge is sketchy for Grads.
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    (Original post by marioslemon)
    I didn't know that it was grad vs grad and undergrad vs undergrad. Good to know though because this explains why I got rejected by all my 4 choices and I am a grad. Thank you! This clears a lot of things in my head
    Do you mind if i ask what degree classification, UKCAT score and work experience you had when applying? Thanks!
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    Does anyone know what funding is available for people in OP’s situation?

    I’m a graduate and I have 3 interviews for GEM course, which gets funded well. I have 1 at a standard entry 5 year Course though. Would I have to fund the entire thing, or is most of it sill covered by the NHS?

    TIA
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    (Original post by gradmedic123)
    Does anyone know what funding is available for people in OP’s situation?

    I’m a graduate and I have 3 interviews for GEM course, which gets funded well. I have 1 at a standard entry 5 year Course though. Would I have to fund the entire thing, or is most of it sill covered by the NHS?

    TIA
    You have to fund the first 4 years of tuition fees on a 5 year course. You get maintenance loans for the duration. NHS takes over in fifth year.
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    (Original post by ForestCat)
    You have to fund the first 4 years of tuition fees on a 5 year course. You get maintenance loans for the duration. NHS takes over in fifth year.
    Jesus. Thanks for the reply.
    Well that is going to be incredibly tricky. Seems a bit stupid to be honest. Why would the NHS not fund it?
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    (Original post by gradmedic123)
    Jesus. Thanks for the reply.
    Well that is going to be incredibly tricky. Seems a bit stupid to be honest. Why would the NHS not fund it?
    We're lucky they fund anything at all. They have stopped for all other healthcare degrees.
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    (Original post by ForestCat)
    We're lucky they fund anything at all. They have stopped for all other healthcare degrees.
    Graduates moving into medicine is a very common route for new doctors. You won’t see anywhere near as many graduate nurses or graduate OTs - even so, there are plenty of other routes for them to explore.

    I think it’s pretty nonsensical for them to fund the 4 year almost entirely but only fund one year of a standard entry for a graduate. It’s a place that would have been taken by non-graduate, so what’s their logic?
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