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    With the course, I like the broad aspect of it, apart from the fact that it's compulsory to do core modules on interdisciplinary stuff and learn a language. I don't know what these core modules involve and by looking them up on the website I don't know if I would find them interesting to be honest with you. I could find the language section alright but honestly I don't really want to learn a language either. Furthermore, I don't know if I like all the group/ individual presentations since I get anxious and have speech problems anyway! But I don't know if I'm just being paranoid since I haven't even tried out the core modules yet. I really want to go to UCL and it is the best offer I have in terms of location, social life and diversity, but I just don't know if I'll regret going there for the course. Advice please?
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    (Original post by frwfood)
    With the course, I like the broad aspect of it, apart from the fact that it's compulsory to do core modules on interdisciplinary stuff and learn a language. I don't know what these core modules involve and by looking them up on the website I don't know if I would find them interesting to be honest with you. I could find the language section alright but honestly I don't really want to learn a language either. Furthermore, I don't know if I like all the group/ individual presentations since I get anxious and have speech problems anyway! But I don't know if I'm just being paranoid since I haven't even tried out the core modules yet. I really want to go to UCL and it is the best offer I have in terms of location, social life and diversity, but I just don't know if I'll regret going there for the course. Advice please?
    Hi there, third year UCL Arts and Sciences student here. First, congratulations on getting an offer for the course and glad you like the broad aspect of the course.

    The core modules and language courses are a big part of the degree, though - they make up 50% of the course. There is quite a lot of information on the website at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/basc/current/core if that's helpful. Personally, I really enjoyed the interdisciplinary and broad nature of the core courses, but they certainly can be quite different to anything else you might have studied (especially 'Approaches to Knowledge', which is really about thinking about whatever else it is that you study in a completely different way). In your second year, you can choose from a list of core modules and interdisciplinary electives, so there's a lot more choice there (I took Quantitative Methods 2, where we did some analysis of data from US presidential elections, as well as Understanding Cities and their Spatial Cultures, which had a lot of different lectures about different aspects of cities (mainly London) from different disciplines like social physics, space syntax, history, etc. But if you were interested in different areas, you could take (say) Psychology in the Real World and Object Lessons, which is based around looking at objects from museums).

    I'd advise you to have a look at the details of some of the core modules on the website (especially the second year ones) and see if there's anything that interests you. I would say, don't come and do the course if you really don't like anything you see; but if some things look interesting and there are some that you're not sure about, keep an open mind and try it out. Regarding the language, it's not been my favourite part of the course (just not the most interesting thing for me) but there are quite a few languages on offer so you could take the opportunity to try something completely different that you haven't had a chance to learn before (e.g. Japanese/Arabic for some students)

    I don't think there are really very many individual/group presentations on the course - most university courses will incorporate some element of individual/group presentation in it. It's definitely a useful skill to develop and something that I grew in confidence in doing over the course of the degree programme. The good thing is that the students and staff on the BASc course make a very supportive environment so it's a great way of building up confidence in a safe environment. Also, the presentations normally only count for something like 10% of the grade for that one module, so if something doesn't go so well, it's not going to affect your degree considerably. It's definitely not something that I would think about as being a major part of the degree.

    Hope that all helps, and feel free to get in touch with me if I can give any more help!
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    (Original post by keeelan)
    Hi there, third year UCL Arts and Sciences student here. First, congratulations on getting an offer for the course and glad you like the broad aspect of the course.

    The core modules and language courses are a big part of the degree, though - they make up 50% of the course. There is quite a lot of information on the website at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/basc/current/core if that's helpful. Personally, I really enjoyed the interdisciplinary and broad nature of the core courses, but they certainly can be quite different to anything else you might have studied (especially 'Approaches to Knowledge', which is really about thinking about whatever else it is that you study in a completely different way). In your second year, you can choose from a list of core modules and interdisciplinary electives, so there's a lot more choice there (I took Quantitative Methods 2, where we did some analysis of data from US presidential elections, as well as Understanding Cities and their Spatial Cultures, which had a lot of different lectures about different aspects of cities (mainly London) from different disciplines like social physics, space syntax, history, etc. But if you were interested in different areas, you could take (say) Psychology in the Real World and Object Lessons, which is based around looking at objects from museums).

    I'd advise you to have a look at the details of some of the core modules on the website (especially the second year ones) and see if there's anything that interests you. I would say, don't come and do the course if you really don't like anything you see; but if some things look interesting and there are some that you're not sure about, keep an open mind and try it out. Regarding the language, it's not been my favourite part of the course (just not the most interesting thing for me) but there are quite a few languages on offer so you could take the opportunity to try something completely different that you haven't had a chance to learn before (e.g. Japanese/Arabic for some students)

    I don't think there are really very many individual/group presentations on the course - most university courses will incorporate some element of individual/group presentation in it. It's definitely a useful skill to develop and something that I grew in confidence in doing over the course of the degree programme. The good thing is that the students and staff on the BASc course make a very supportive environment so it's a great way of building up confidence in a safe environment. Also, the presentations normally only count for something like 10% of the grade for that one module, so if something doesn't go so well, it's not going to affect your degree considerably. It's definitely not something that I would think about as being a major part of the degree.

    Hope that all helps, and feel free to get in touch with me if I can give any more help!
    Hi,
    thank you so much for replying!!
    I was just wondering; what types of people normally take the course? Are you all really 'leadership' type people, outgoing, loud and completely confident in your abilities and futures? I'm quite the opposite and I just don't know if i'll fit in to the course comfortably.
    Also, how do the people on your course form friendship groups if you take so many different subjects?
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    (Original post by frwfood)
    Hi,
    thank you so much for replying!!
    I was just wondering; what types of people normally take the course? Are you all really 'leadership' type people, outgoing, loud and completely confident in your abilities and futures? I'm quite the opposite and I just don't know if i'll fit in to the course comfortably.
    Also, how do the people on your course form friendship groups if you take so many different subjects?
    Hi, no problem at all!

    Not at all! We have a real mix of people on the course. Just like anywhere else, some people are more confident and outgoing types compared to others, we're all different people. People change during the degree too and the degree definitely tries to encourage you to be confident in yourself and your abilities, but I think plenty of us are uncertain about our abilities especially since we aren't just studying one subject in detail.

    In terms of forming friendships etc., you get to know people in the common room, you see them at the core modules that everyone takes, or at induction week/ other social events that the BASc society or department runs, of which there are quite a few if you're interested, especially in the first couple of weeks of term. I met my best friends at a scavenger hunt that was run in the first week, and they all study quite different things to me. You see the same BASc people in the core modules in first year and otherwise you meet people that are studying the same things as you. Societies are also a great way to meet people with similar interests to you.
 
 
 
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