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    I want to do a useful university course, so as engineering, finance or nursing, which I would be open to do either, but am I good enough?
    I got 2 A's, 2 B's and 3 C's at GCSE's.
    I got a CCE at a level(without much effort).
    I find it strange because I see people who get straight A's/A*'s at school and fail at universities, while at the same time people getting C's or low B's getting 1st/2:1 degrees at decent universities in a useful course. Why is that? makes little sense.
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    It’s all about hard work at uni, not what you got at A level. If you find a course that you’re interested in and will work hard at then of course you are smart enough. University is there to teach you, you don’t have to know much before you go. Just work.
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    (Original post by Adam.C123)
    I want to do a useful university course, so as engineering, finance or nursing, which I would be open to do either, but am I good enough?
    I got 2 A's, 2 B's and 3 C's at GCSE's.
    I got a CCE at a level(without much effort).
    I find it strange because I see people who get straight A's/A*'s at school and fail at universities, while at the same time people getting C's or low B's getting 1st/2:1 degrees at decent universities in a useful course. Why is that? makes little sense.
    Your best bet is to do some research using the UCAS course search to find some courses that interest you. I have certainly seen some university courses that will accept you with those grades, but specific courses will depend on subjects as well as grades.

    People struggle/fail at university for multiple reasons. Some people lose interest in their course or find that it wasn't quite what they were expecting. Some people adapt poorly to moving away from home and doing everything for themselves the first time. Some people may not get along with the teaching formats (e.g. few colleges will give truly 'lecture-style' lessons). For some people who found GCSEs and A levels reasonably easy, they may simply have never had to put in much effort, so when the difficulty ramps up at university they work less hard and consequently don't do as well. And that isn't even considering other forces that can be at play, such as health conditions (especially mental health problems), and events such as bereavement.

    If university is what you genuinely want to do, then you can absolutely do it. Find a course you really want to do. This is important; getting onto a course you don't enjoy will make studying very tedious, and moreover you may struggle to convince admissions tutors to even admit you if you can't better explain why you want to do the course. All degrees are 'useful' to an extent. Maybe get some work experience in the areas you've mentioned to see what you truly enjoy.
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    I strongly believe its to do with how much effort youre willing to put in.

    Im someone that got below average GCSE grades- went to a **** school, didn't know how to revise, did barely any revision.
    So when i was in college, reality hit me like a truck! I starting working hard and had put in a lot more effort into my work. Ended up with 4 unconditional offers.
    Im now in uni getting high 2:1s for my assignments.

    So yes, if you find a course you like and are willing to work hard, you can do it.
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    (Original post by 1secondsofvamps)
    I strongly believe its to do with how much effort youre willing to put in.

    Im someone that got below average GCSE grades- went to a **** school, didn't know how to revise, did barely any revision.
    So when i was in college, reality hit me like a truck! I starting working hard and had put in a lot more effort into my work. Ended up with 4 unconditional offers.
    Im now in uni getting high 2:1s for my assignments.

    So yes, if you find a course you like and are willing to work hard, you can do it.
    What do you study?
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    (Original post by Adam.C123)
    I want to do a useful university course, so as engineering, finance or nursing, which I would be open to do either, but am I good enough?
    I got 2 A's, 2 B's and 3 C's at GCSE's.
    I got a CCE at a level(without much effort).
    I find it strange because I see people who get straight A's/A*'s at school and fail at universities, while at the same time people getting C's or low B's getting 1st/2:1 degrees at decent universities in a useful course. Why is that? makes little sense.
    In most subjects hard work is much more important than base intelligence. The exceptions are maths and some of the hard sciences.
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    I got 2 A's, 2 B's and 3 C's and got 4/5 offers from universities.
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    (Original post by KristianHJ)
    I got 2 A's, 2 B's and 3 C's and got 4/5 offers from universities.
    What course/courses and what university/university?
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    I would safe to say that if you find a course that you are interested in and passionate about, you are more likely to get better grades than someone who is doing a degree because they were unsure of what to do. Like someone has already said, it's all about how much you put in.

    Secondly, I got a mixture of grades at GCSE and A level, from 5 A's down to an E at GCSE and BC and D* at A level. To say the least, by the time I was starting A Levels, I wanted to be studying teaching, not maths or english. It didn't interest me.

    Uni has so many teaching methods too. I have field trips and lecturers who literally bounce off the walls, but all of it is working towards my long standing dream of teaching. That's what motivates me. Be motivated and you'll get there. I got lower grades than my uni wanted, but they still accepted me. It really depends what uni and if they can see you as a student. Good luck. And remember that uni isn't the only way, so don't be disheartened.
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    You can find some courses. Perhaps you’ll not be able to do medicine, law, engineering or economics but you’ll find something.
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    I got BDD at A-Level and struggled like hell, rocked up to uni for a Computer Science degree and was told I’d probably fail, yet averaged 75% for just over 2 years and my attendance is something like 5%

    How, A-Levels are highly regulated and super strict, universities are not and thus “play the game”.. papers are more predictable, sometimes you are spoon fed to pass.

    University seems to be more coursework heavy too, it’s a god send.. you can spend as much time as you like refining work providing you give yourself enough time.
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    (Original post by Adam.C123)
    What course/courses and what university/university?
    Sorry for late reply. Software Engineering. Lancaster, Chester, De Montfort, Kingston.
    I didn't have the Grade B in maths for Lancaster but applied anyways and was offered a place.
 
 
 
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