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feeling ashamed about the email I sent to my teacher... watch

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    Go and talk to him in person and stop stressing.
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    (Original post by Notnek)
    If it was me I'd reply again saying that I was sorry if my email came across in a certain way. It's a bit embarassing but at least you're making sure that you apologise just in case your teacher didn't like your email.

    But I don't think it will be a big deal if you do nothing.
    Afterwards I did send an email apologising for forgetting to turn up to retake one of my past tests. I don't really want to bombard him with 3 emails at a time. Do you know if teachers check their inbox on weekends of over half term?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Afterwards I did send an email apologising for forgetting to turn up to retake one of my past tests. I don't really want to bombard him with 3 emails at a time. Do you know if teachers check their inbox on weekends of over half term?
    It depends on the teacher. Some will, some won't.
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    (Original post by Notnek)
    It depends on the teacher. Some will, some won't.
    Okay I'd rather bare the embarrassment than come across as ignorant.

    Can I say this:

    I am sorry if the email I sent earlier came across in a certain way. I won't ask again about things that aren't intended for me to know.

    (my name)
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I think a student should respect their teachers no matter what they say or do. If they have authority then students should unquestioningly respect them.
    I disagree with this though, just because someone is in a position of authority doesn’t mean we have to unquestioningly respect them. It’s okay to call out a teacher if you feel that there’s some kind of unjust behaviour going on. (I mean in general though, not applied to this particular post).
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    This is why I don't like emails. So much room for misunderstandings. I try and meet people face to face where possible which unfortunately is not always.
    I think the teacher's email was very vague. Is he always like that? I agree with Notnek that this is no way to respond to a school student. If anything, he was encouraging whatever disrespect you feel you have caused. Also, students don't have time for vague emails when they are preparing for a test

    On the other hand, maybe he was just enquiring where you got the topic list since he didn't provide one yet, but didn't manage to convey the question correctly.

    Either way, you didn't do anything worth so much self criticism. Opinions about you aren't going to change based on something this trivial.
    I also agree with Bethany1309. However if being respectful is that important to you, there are ways to call someone out without being disrespectful. In this case, you could have just clarified you didn't understand by explaining you found the list from a different teacher and you are wondering if it'll be the same for you etc.

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I am sorry if the email I sent earlier came across in a certain way. I won't ask again about things that aren't intended for me to know.
    I would replace the second line to instead ask for clarification about his response. Students are usually informed what topics would be included in a test. It's not like you asked for the question paper in advance. Now, that would be funny
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    (Original post by S1374)
    This is why I don't like emails. So much room for misunderstandings. I try and meet people face to face where possible which unfortunately is not always.
    I think the teacher's email was very vague. Is he always like that? I agree with Notnek that this is no way to respond to a school student. If anything, he was encouraging whatever disrespect you feel you have caused. Also, students don't have time for vague emails when they are preparing for a test

    On the other hand, maybe he was just enquiring where you got the topic list since he didn't provide one yet, but didn't manage to convey the question correctly.

    Either way, you didn't do anything worth so much self criticism. Opinions about you aren't going to change based on something this trivial.
    I also agree with Bethany1309. However if being respectful is that important to you, there are ways to call someone out without being disrespectful. In this case, you could have just clarified you didn't understand by explaining you found the list from a different teacher and you are wondering if it'll be the same for you etc.


    I would replace the second line to instead ask for clarification about his response. Students are usually informed what topics would be included in a test. It's not like you asked for the question paper in advance. Now, that would be funny
    Thanks, this made me feel a lot better. Do you think I should also apologise in person for the rude email I sent? I was planning to when I next see him after half term.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Do you think I should also apologise in person for the rude email I sent? I was planning to when I next see him after half term.
    I wouldn't, as a quick apology by email is enough. Apologising in person might just make things awkward for you and you will be unnecessarily worrying about this until end of half-term. Teachers handle a lot of emails and he probably won't even remember by then . Best stop worrying and forget about this
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    Why weren't you simply honest about how you obtained the information? His email implies to me that it's something that you shouldn't have known and he wanted to know the source of the leak.
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    (Original post by sinfonietta)
    Why weren't you simply honest about how you obtained the information? His email implies to me that it's something that you shouldn't have known and he wanted to know the source of the leak.
    Because the other teacher always emails his students the topics before a test, so I wouldn't really call it a 'leak'. One of my friends, who's in his class, forwarded the list to me, that was all. So at that moment I didn't think it was bad in any way to know what the topics are, as 40-or-so other students knew them.

    Since he didn't answer my question, it left me a bit frustrated. It was all I could think to say really. I mean if he asked me again when he sees me of course I'd tell him that it was from another teacher.
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    (Original post by S1374)
    I wouldn't, as a quick apology by email is enough. Apologising in person might just make things awkward for you and you will be unnecessarily worrying about this until end of half-term. Teachers handle a lot of emails and he probably won't even remember by then . Best stop worrying and forget about this
    So when I next see him, instead of apologising to him again, shall I just say that I found the list on another Math's teacher's website?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    So when I next see him, instead of apologising to him again, shall I just say that I found the list on another Math's teacher's website?
    If you are apologising via email, might as well mention this there and get this over with so when you next see him, this matter will have been closed and it'll be classes as usual.
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    (Original post by S1374)
    If you are apologising via email, might as well mention this there and get this over with so when you next see him, this matter will have been closed and it'll be classes as usual.
    I already sent him an apology over email. I think it'd be better if I go talk to him in person.
 
 
 
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