Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

How hard is university compared to a levels in your experience? watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    What I mean by this question is how big is the gap from a level to university?

    1.Do you think a levels gave you a good foundation for your university course?

    2.What makes university hard compared to a levels?

    4.What course do you do?

    5.Which university do you go to if you don't mind sharing?

    6.What did you make/do you make of your course?

    7.What is the work load like?
    • Section Leader
    • Very Important Poster
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Very Important Poster
    Peer Support Volunteers
    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    What I mean by this question is how big is the gap from a level to university?

    1.Do you think a levels gave you a good foundation for your university course?

    2.What makes university hard compared to a levels?

    4.What course do you do?

    5.Which university do you go to if you don't mind sharing?

    6.What did you make/do you make of your course?

    7.What is the work load like?
    I got BEE in my a levels and actually found university easier, however I did have a terminally ill relative throughout a levels so university was less stressful. I did two years of health and social care at uclan to get onto nursing then realised i didn't want to be a nurse after all. I had two full days of lectures so plenty of time to manage my work load and do many other things as well. I think some people do experience a gap between a levels and university, learning to study more independently and write assignments such as essays at a higher level takes time to get used to.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    university is much tougher in terms of workload and depth of knowledge required. BUT most people find it far less stressful because at A levels you have to worry about the difference between A*, A, B, C whereas at uni, you've got a 'distinction' grade of a 1st class degree which only the top students are expected to get, and then most of the rest of us are expected to get a 'merit' upper second, so you've only got to worry about getting a lower second.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    I found A-levels fairly straightforward, you could just get a board specific textbook, learn everything in that to a good standard, do a couple of past papers and you should be ok in exams. Uni took me quite a lot longer to get used to (a large part of this is my own doing as my degree is quite diff to my A-levels).

    Even now after 18 months, I'm only about 80% sure what I'm doing. The difficulty varies a lot module to module. I don't go for the easiest ones but the ones which just seem the most interesting.

    A-levels I spent about 25 hours a week whereas at uni it's closer to 40. And that's just to keep me at a 2:1 standard
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    What I mean by this question is how big is the gap from a level to university?

    1.Do you think a levels gave you a good foundation for your university course?

    2.What makes university hard compared to a levels?

    4.What course do you do?

    5.Which university do you go to if you don't mind sharing?

    6.What did you make/do you make of your course?

    7.What is the work load like?
    Obviously the level of knowledge you gain at university will be more complex/detailed than at A level, and whether the latter prepares you sufficiently for your degree in terms of information depends on how related they are to what you have chosen to study at university.

    However, it isn't necessarily that A levels are 'harder' or 'easier' in most cases: you're likely to be more passionate about your degree than your A level subjects (as presumably it is more specific to your interests/future career), and therefore you might find your degree easier in that sense; but harder in that you can no longer memorise past paper answers and get your learning/revision time allocated for you as is the case with A levels. You're expected to do a lot of your learning outside of lectures, which is a challenge in discipline and motivation.

    Time management is also a huge factor that can throw 1st years, in terms of meeting assignment deadlines/keeping up with lecture notes/revising for exams. Unlike teachers, lecturers won't keep reminding you about these things, so you need to be on the ball with everything from the get-go.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    probs 10x more content at uni but in terms of grades getting a 2:1 was easier than getting a C at a level for me
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    What I mean by this question is how big is the gap from a level to university?

    1.Do you think a levels gave you a good foundation for your university course?

    2.What makes university hard compared to a levels?

    4.What course do you do?

    5.Which university do you go to if you don't mind sharing?

    6.What did you make/do you make of your course?

    7.What is the work load like?
    1) Not really. Only A-Level Maths gave me a decent grounding

    2) Workload is slightly higher than A-Levels I'd say and the need to spend hours looking for internships/opportunities to improve your CV (Thanks to some ludicrous 50% of people must go to university target, a degree is now virtually worthless)

    3) MInf Informatics (aka CompSci, first-year)

    5) University of Edinburgh

    6) CompSci has always been an interest of mine (same for medicine and biological sciences, but not as much as CS) so it made sense for me to do a degree in it. The Scottish system is also incredibly flexible, which allows me to change up my courses/modules. I'd like to explore AI a bit more, and Edinburgh's known for AI research which is reflected by how mathematical/theoretical the course is compared to say, KCL/York.

    7) There's quite a bit to do, but I still have time to do touristy stuff around the city and occasionally go to society related/department related events.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    Generally per subject it's a bit harder but overall it depends how good you were at your non-degree A-level options
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.