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Which degrees are most likely to guarantee quick, well-paid employment? watch

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    (Original post by Sceptical_John)
    Guarantee & good may be stronger words than I'd use but I think there's some evidence out there.

    Take teaching for example. Look how hard the government finds it to recruit physics & maths teachers. Only getting about 70% of what they need each year. Now, teaching may not necessarily be an example of a good & well-paid job but it shows how in demand those grads are. That they will give then £26k just to train!



    I am kind of assuming our OP gets at least 2:1 if they want a well-paid job! TBH I've been out of the engineering loop for a few years. It was certainly in demand when I worked in telecoms we had to hire many from overseas! but that was 5-6 years ago.
    Your success 5-6 years ago naturally made its way to the general student population and now everyone is doing an engineering degree. It seems like its the most popular degree for boys, after business management/other finance like subject
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    Not all medical courses guarantee you a job. Medicine definitely, pharmacy also, nursing, radiography, radiotherapy, though I would not advise anyone go into these latter three professions. The amount of work and effort that you put into them is definitely not worth the rewards. Optometry and dentistry have good job prospects...and by good job prospects I mean you are grantueedd a job irrespective of how well you do at uni and irrespective of where yo go to apply....You can travel anywhere in the world and easily find a job in any of the aforementioned professions. Outside of these professions though job prospects are terrible.
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    (Original post by CookieButter)
    Not all medical courses guarantee you a job. Medicine definitely, pharmacy also, nursing, radiography, radiotherapy, though I would not advise anyone go into these latter three professions. The amount of work and effort that you put into them is definitely not worth the rewards. Optometry and dentistry have good job prospects...and by good job prospects I mean you are grantueedd a job irrespective of how well you do at uni and irrespective of where yo go to apply....You can travel anywhere in the world and easily find a job in any of the aforementioned professions. Outside of these professions though job prospects are terrible.
    Why not radiography? I thought that was pretty decent? How much does it pay?
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    Politics, Law, Engineering, Economics, Business, Finance and Comp Sci are good degrees to hold if you want a well paid job
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    I generally agree with some of the comments on here. I'm somewhat prejudiced, being an electrical engineer [NOT technician]. I started out with a BSEE, and about 10 yrs after graduating with that [here in the states], i went back and upgraded to a masters in EE. I think computer science should be good too, but you should be competent in coding, web design, assembly, C++, and other high level languages. I'm presently teaching myself assembly, because i never learned it, and i have a couple of little projects i'm working on that would go very well, with a little assembly code. I considered medicine, when i was deciding upon a career, right out of high school. I decided against it, because i didn't want patients dying on me. A 'killer' combination [which a mate of mine's kid did], was a bachelors in Electrical Engineering, followed by a law degree. [Here in the states, a LLD, is a graduate degree]. Most of the lawyers do 'history' or 'english' or some other nearly worthless degree for their undergraduate. The advantage of engineering, is that this kid went into patent law. With the increasingly technical bent of our society, a lawyer that can understand electronics and hardware design is worth his weight in gold. Last i heard (and this was about 10 years ago), this kid was making about $245,000. Now i could live on that!!! )

    Electrical engineers with RF experience in laying out cellphone systems to ensure adequate coverage of the system to mobile users are doing well here too. Look at "Monster.com" or "Indeed.com' for current job offerings. Best of luck!!
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    (Original post by ajj2000)
    Why not radiography? I thought that was pretty decent? How much does it pay?
    when you graduate you earn around 25k...it goes up to 35k 5-6 years after graduation and thats where it plateaus. If you work in the private sector through an agency you can earn up to 45k if you work non-stop but that kind of work depends on availability so hitting 45k is not very likely. That's about as good as it gets for your average radiographer. Emphasis on the word average. Now, there are radiographers out there that are earning more and others that earn less than this but they are rare particularly the ones earning more.

    You don't see radiographers driving 50k pound cars or living in affluent neighbourhoods as you would doctors ...despite radiographers i think working much harder than doctors....that's because radiography isn't as financially rewarding as medicine. No, its not very rewarding at all for the amount of effort that you put into it. I've studied radiography and I'm currently studying medicine. Medicine is a lot easier and a lot less stressful and that says a lot about radiography because medicine is f'n murder.
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    I would recommend considering overseas employment, if you do a technical degree [engineering, IT, something like that]. You cannot even break even - going to places like London, Paris, D.C., Ottawa..etc. You have to go to places nobody wants to go to. Beirut, Venezuela, Brazil, Mexico, India, etc. Knowledge of a second or third language can be a plus too. I spent 3 years in the early '70s, banked nearly everything i made [my job included meals and quarters furnished]. I came back and bought a house with the proceeds, spending the left over funds on securities - which in the interim have done fairly well. We got a 30% bonus for signing up, coupled with all the overtime we wanted to work - and there wasn't much else to do but work. People who can work in an overseas environment are valued by many companies that have to work overseas. I'd consider Bechtel, Boots&Coots, Schlumberger, as well as Uk firms. I realise that the 'oil patch' is depressed right now, but that won't last forever. If you are willing to stop the "party, party, party" business for a few years, it can pay dividends. Also, you may find some place [like Belize for example], where you'd prefer to live - rather than the Uk. Costa Rica, Ecuador, and Panama are attracting large number of Uk and US retirees, largely because their living costs are considerably lower, medical care is excellent (better than US or Uk), and english (and yank) are widely spoken. Best of luck!!
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    Maths degree - you can get into teaching with a bursary of 25,000 to train. Other subjects get no funding. The reason that the government cannot get teachers to come to train for maths is that they all have jobs after university.
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    Before i started my bachelors degree program, i considered 5 or 6 different careers. I 'generated' this list by applying several 'filters'. "Guidance counselors" usually say that the only criteria is "you have to like what you do". This is the only filter that they apply. This is lousy advice. I like listening to rock music - so i'm going to make a living doing that!! RIIGHT!!

    My 'filters' were: a> can i make a decent living doing this? [decent living being defined as being in the top 20% or so of wage earners], b> will the profession outlive me? [will i be able to get a job doing it, as long as i want one? I don't want to be a buggy whip maker when petrol autos come in, c> Am i so positioned that i can acquire the credentialisation necessary to do this job, and can i continue to do it for the rest of my working life? [being a champion mile runner, or olympic figure skating star, can only last for a few years. You won't see 50 yr olds doing it, but you'll still be alive (hopefully) at 50, and need income, IF you are a retired footie player, or coach [which is what players normally 'morph' into], can you find employment in something (other than sweeping the streets) at 50?, d> Am i reasonably protected from having my job "exported"? [is it something that could not reasonably be 'outsourced' to Hong Kong, mainland China, or elsewhere?] e> are there enough different 'facets' of this job, that over time, i can change to a different facet, if the market dries up for the one i am engaged in, without a lot of 're-training' being required?, f> jobs are 'created' by market conditions and new developments over time. Many new jobs don't exist when you start your degree program, but become 'big' later. Will my training and experience be broad enough that i can change over into one of these 'new' fields, without having to start my degree program over? g> lastly: Will i "like" doing this, (or something like it) for the rest of my life. This is probably 50 to 60 years.

    I applied those filters, and interviewed at least 4 adults that were qualified (and practicing the profession) in each of those industries. I asked: "How much do you make", "Where do you see yourself in 5 yrs, 10 years", "What would you have done differently, if you had your education to do over"? "What other professions did you consider, when you were where i am now?"

    My choice, after doing all of this, was electrical engineering [BSEE]1969. I later went back - after working 10 yrs or so, and upgraded my credentials to a master's degree [MSEE]1987. I think (in retrospect), that those were good decisions. Best of luck!!
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    (Original post by Di Lloyd)
    Maths degree - you can get into teaching with a bursary of 25,000 to train. Other subjects get no funding. The reason that the government cannot get teachers to come to train for maths is that they all have jobs after university.
    quite a few other subjects do get funding. Also you only need 50% maths in the degree which gives you a few more options
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    (Original post by hannah00)
    and compete against grads from India and the philippines able to work for $10,000 a year ?
    Well, actually it's not that simple. If you work for a Uk or US firm, they will probably decide that they want it done 'right' rather than 'cheap'. As i heard one engineer say about software written in India: "2/3 of what they write is cr**. You'd think that you could just throw that part away, but often there are latent defects in the other 1/3, so in reality, you can't use ANY of it with a clear conscience. If you have to pick through it line by line - you'd be better off writing it yourself. At least, there'd be less chance of a 'bomb' being hidden in there somewhere. Another aspect is, if you are doing classified work, the foreign candidates can't pass a security clearance - so in that case, there IS no competition. Cheers.
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    To those people saying econ/business for a finance job, as somebody from Econ doing finance, I can let you know that almost any degree (science, English, history, politics, law, etc) can get you a job in finance. if you want finance jobs as a backup from any degree you just need to read some finance materials and follow the market.

    So to maximise job prospects maybe do something else. For salary fropm the get go, finance jobs yes or CompSci, or medicine/vet etc
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    (Original post by Rabbit2)
    Well, actually it's not that simple. If you work for a Uk or US firm, they will probably decide that they want it done 'right' rather than 'cheap'. As i heard one engineer say about software written in India: "2/3 of what they write is cr**. You'd think that you could just throw that part away, but often there are latent defects in the other 1/3, so in reality, you can't use ANY of it with a clear conscience. If you have to pick through it line by line - you'd be better off writing it yourself. At least, there'd be less chance of a 'bomb' being hidden in there somewhere. Another aspect is, if you are doing classified work, the foreign candidates can't pass a security clearance - so in that case, there IS no competition. Cheers.
    no western companies have no loyalty to hiring people from their home country. Your friend probably hired a cheap company, and the quality issue does not apply when they are working in the same country and employer trains them up. Your confusing outsourcing with hiring from abroad.

    You dont need a Security Clearance to build something or work on a building site, only to work there as a govt employee once operational.
    Gulf countries wont hire british people to carry out classified in Dubai or Qatar. Anyone can get a security clearance there turks and pakistanis working in arab militaries for decades.

    stop giving out misleading advise on the Internet. The Gulf region is no longer the goldmine it was for western expats 30 or even 10 years ago.
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    (Original post by Kyber Ninja)
    It's dentistry, easily.

    Medicine also isn't "quick"; what are you boyos smoking.

    Also, Chem Eng
    I just mean in terms of after having got the degree. Medicine is obviously super hard and long but after you've got it you're pretty much guaranteed a good, successful career.
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    (Original post by Sidian)
    I just mean in terms of after having got the degree. Medicine is obviously super hard and long but after you've got it you're pretty much guaranteed a good, successful career.
    My dad is almost 50, is a surgeon, on salary of roughly £90,000.

    You could get that money as a dentist easily within 10 years. A Chemical Engineer is easily making six figures at age 50

    Granted he only does NHS work, but still
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    (Original post by Sidian)
    It's mostly doom and gloom on this site and people say the market is oversaturated even for STEM, so I'm wondering which degrees people are actually positive about?

    I guess I'll put my hat in the ring and say Medicine. If you manage to get on a medical course and don't drop out, you're practically guaranteed success.
    Definitely Medicine. Dentistry would be the higher paid option out of the two depending on where in the world you practice. Further education can enhance your financial benefits by opening doors to a specialist environment. I believe Econ, Architecture, Pilot training, Engineering in any form prove to be very high paid jobs. HOWEVER. None of this matters unless you are passionate about what you do. My view is that if you work hard enough for anything you truly enjoy, money will come itself. You have to be great at what you do in any field nowadays because of the competition and saturation. If you are into tech, development would be the way forward. Coding etc. Find your identity and get work experience in multiple fields to help you decide where you see yourself in a couple years. Money is awesome, but you'd rather have a little less and enjoy what you do, day in and out. Quick cash is all a lie haha it requires a lot of time, investment and energy to get to anywhere worth being.
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    (Original post by Sidian)
    I just mean in terms of after having got the degree. Medicine is obviously super hard and long but after you've got it you're pretty much guaranteed a good, successful career.
    This is not necessarily true. It comes with a lot of stress and hardship. Working for a hospital brings about a lot of situations where a case can be made against you and this in turn, can destroy your career. The willingness to learn, travel for work and experience in different sectors will aid your financial journey. Medicine/Dentistry is not for everyone, but if you have love for the cause, DO IT! I'm having the best learning years of my life currently studying Dentistry and I'd highly advise it!
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    The Sciences inc Maths For some, I wouldn’t go to University the work you get on leaving doesn’t equate to the debt you’re in (most won’t pay it back). It’s often better to get a job and work at it to gain experience and promotion.
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    (Original post by JDieMstr)
    Engineering. Just leave UK and go Dubai or somewhere in middle east, easy money.
    how does it work?
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    (Original post by mansnothot)
    how does it work?
    People usually build up some experience here in the UK then apply for/get headhunted for/transfer to jobs overseas.

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