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Which degrees are most likely to guarantee quick, well-paid employment? watch

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    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    I see. I thought they would see an oxford degree in the same light as someone with a stanford degree. I wish I had the $$$ to do a masters in the US.

    Is the process different to get a H-1B than an L-1B?
    Well, not really since you wouldn't have the on campus recruiting than Stanford has to the same extent.

    Yeah, one is a lottery/allocated quota and the other is uncapped and eligible to those who have already worked at a company with US and overseas offices. Kind of why it's not really possible to just move to the US straight after uni - even if you get a job offer you'd likely not get the H1-B.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Well, not really since you wouldn't have the on campus recruiting than Stanford has to the same extent.

    Yeah, one is a lottery/allocated quota and the other is uncapped and eligible to those who have already worked at a company with US and overseas offices. Kind of why it's not really possible to just move to the US straight after uni - even if you get a job offer you'd likely not get the H1-B.
    Yeah I think I'd have to convert my L-1B into a H-1B. So I have to persuade my employer to transfer me to their american office on an L-1B, then after awhile I get them to convert it to a H-1B?

    Also, do you know if any of the big silicon valley schools like Stanford, CMU, MIT offer scholarships to britons ?
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    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    Yeah I think I'd have to convert my L-1B into a H-1B. So I have to persuade my employer to transfer me to their american office on an L-1B, then after awhile I get them to convert it to a H-1B?

    Also, do you know if any of the big silicon valley schools like Stanford, CMU, MIT offer scholarships to britons ?
    Yeah, it's a pretty good safety net since if you're unlucky in the h1 lottery you can still stay in the US and still have your green card get pegged for processing.

    No idea sorry. Fulbright usually has stuff though.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    That decision is entirely up to you and what you want to study.

    There are vocational degrees that lead to specific careers like medicine, architecture, dentistry, nursing, engineering etc and the associated careers.

    There are degrees that lead to general careers open to everyone (including those with the aforementioned vocational degrees) or research/academia/teaching. Aka, every academic degree out there and 70% of grad jobs.

    There are degrees that lead to careers that have a preference for those with any quantitative degree (some engineering falls in here i.e. if you're doing maths/physics then head into engineering via a masters) the likes of analytics, quantitative/exotic derivatives trading and research, software eng, actuarial etc where you'll find mathmos, CS, natsci, eng type degree holders.

    Essentially, just choose what you'll enjoy studying the most because there are all sorts of doors towards a good career.

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    the thing is tho if choose something i enjoy, will i actually be successful by which i mean get a job at the end of the degree. those are my concerns.
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    (Original post by mansnothot)
    the thing is tho if choose something i enjoy, will i actually be successful by which i mean get a job at the end of the degree. those are my concerns.
    well, yeah, you'd put more effort into your whole uni experience vs just doing something you think will lead to a job.
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    (Original post by Kyber Ninja)
    My dad is almost 50, is a surgeon, on salary of roughly £90,000.

    You could get that money as a dentist easily within 10 years. A Chemical Engineer is easily making six figures at age 50

    Granted he only does NHS work, but still
    That is a decent salary. I hold a MSEE [masters in electrical engineering], and i occasionally get solicitations from people like "monster.com" In the satellite and terrestrial communications area in the $120,000 to $140,000 range. I am not that familiar with medical salaries here (on this side of the pond), but i expect they would be higher than you quoted there. An additional aspect would be that living costs [outside of NYC and downtown D.C. would probably be less than you're used to. An additional cost factor here might be malpractice insurance. Being an electrical engineer, i don't need that. Cheers.
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    (Original post by Rabbit2)
    That is a decent salary. I hold a MSEE [masters in electrical engineering], and i occasionally get solicitations from people like "monster.com" In the satellite and terrestrial communications area in the $120,000 to $140,000 range. I am not that familiar with medical salaries here (on this side of the pond), but i expect they would be higher than you quoted there. An additional aspect would be that living costs [outside of NYC and downtown D.C. would probably be less than you're used to. An additional cost factor here might be malpractice insurance. Being an electrical engineer, i don't need that. Cheers.
    UK medical doctors make ALOT less than Americans, a lot if it having to do with the public healthcare system.

    A surgeon at his age in America is probably making $400,000, but here he's making a equivalent of $150,000 :/

    but then again, medical school is cheaper, and doesn't require a prior undergraduate degree as well (you can enter from high school)
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    (Original post by Kyber Ninja)
    UK medical doctors make ALOT less than Americans, a lot if it having to do with the public healthcare system.

    A surgeon at his age in America is probably making $400,000, but here he's making a equivalent of $150,000 :/

    but then again, medical school is cheaper, and doesn't require a prior undergraduate degree as well (you can enter from high school)
    Surgeons do earn more in America, but your dad would make significantly more if he chose to do private practice.
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    If you're only going to University for financial gains it's probably not the best investment anymore.

    It's wiser to learn a trade, however if you have a genuine interest in academia it's worth it.

    For instance when we die we leave nothing behind, if through research I could provide wisdom that improved the quality of people's lives, well that's a cause worth pursuing regardless of the finanacial rewards to me.

    That's my take at least, it's not the income that matters but doing something which has a meaningful purpose to you.
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    Regarding the OP, take out the word "guarantee". Degrees can't do that. They can make it likelier to get a well paying job, depending on what you put into them, but nothing can guarantee anything for you. Fall prey to negligence as a surgeon and you may quickly find that that "guarantee" is meaningless. Working on developing your "soft" skills, business acumen and your technical skills all go into becoming a high earner.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Yeah, it's a pretty good safety net since if you're unlucky in the h1 lottery you can still stay in the US and still have your green card get pegged for processing.

    No idea sorry. Fulbright usually has stuff though.

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    Most graduate students in the US are 'employer funded'. I did my MSEE at GW Uni in Washington, D.C. My employer [which was not all that large] have more than 40 people taking graduate courses there [usually at night]. It took me 7 yrs to finish my masters [which is probably a new record]. I went through 3 deans in the process (dean of engineering). Nobody wants to do it. It's more work (it's in addition to your academic responsibilities, and - there is no extra pay - so ppl get out of it as soon as they can. The school has to 'press gang' people into it. They escape as soon as they can. Usually, your company will ask for a 4 to 6 yr commitment, but this includes the period of time you are going to school - so it's not a burden. They get a tax deduction for it, so they make out too. Best of luck - cheers.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Well, not really since you wouldn't have the on campus recruiting than Stanford has to the same extent.

    Yeah, one is a lottery/allocated quota and the other is uncapped and eligible to those who have already worked at a company with US and overseas offices. Kind of why it's not really possible to just move to the US straight after uni - even if you get a job offer you'd likely not get the H1-B.
    If you are employed professionally [say as an engineer], your employer will generally pay your tuition for 'work related courses' - like if you are working on a masters degree in engineering. See my other posts on here for details. Nearly all companies here do this. They get a tax deduction, so they make out too. Cheers.
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    Being a well rounded person who's career minded and goes to a top ~15 uni is the best way to guarantee a job.

    I'd also say doing one of the traditional/STEM subjects is good (perhaps STEM is slightly better)
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    (Original post by higgs334)
    Being a well rounded person who's career minded and goes to a top ~15 uni is the best way to guarantee a job.

    I'd also say doing one of the traditional/STEM subjects is good (perhaps STEM is slightly better)
    100% agree.

    A career minded, intelligent, driven and well rounded student with great social skills doing any academic degree at the top ~15-25 or so universities is pretty much set.

    A technically/quantitatively talented individual with good self awareness doing an engineering, CS, maths, physics or natural sciences (including bio, chem etc) degree at a good uni is set.

    Any student at any uni doing a professional healthcare or allied healthcare degree is set.

    Anyone with immense drive, ambition, a vision, access to capital, strong work ethic, solid social skills and an appropriate risk appetite is also set.

    Creatively talented individuals (either at a good institution or department for their work) or self-taught with the usual pre-reqs are set.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    100% agree.

    A career minded, intelligent, driven and well rounded student with great social skills doing any academic degree at the top ~15-25 or so universities is pretty much set.

    A technically/quantitatively talented individual with good self awareness doing an engineering, CS, maths, physics or natural sciences (including bio, chem etc) degree at a good uni is set.

    Any student at any uni doing a professional healthcare or allied healthcare degree is set.

    Anyone with immense drive, ambition, a vision, access to capital, strong work ethic, solid social skills and an appropriate risk appetite is also set.

    Creatively talented individuals (either at a good institution or department for their work) or self-taught with the usual pre-reqs are set.

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    what about biomed degree at a Russel group uni?
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    (Original post by HighFructose)
    Computer Science has high unemployment rates. What is your comment on that?
    If you restrict your 'employment radius' to within a few miles of where you grew up, that may be true. I did an electrical engineering degree (later upgraded to a masters in EE), and have had little trouble staying employed. I have worked in 14 countries and over most of the US though. I have never changed jobs where i had to take a pay cut. On the other hand, nearly all the time that i got a substantial raise, it was because i'd changed jobs. Right out of uni, with my bachelors degree, i took an overseas assignment to 'get ahead of the power curve'. Money was going out as fast as it was coming in. I went overseas for nearly 3 years, and came back with enough dosh to buy a house. You don't do this going to London, Paris, Rome, etc... Everyone wants to go there, and it ends up costing you money. You have to go to somewhere that they have to bribe you to get someone to go there. When i came back to the states, i took assignments in Alaska (in the winter - brrrrr!), North Dakota (also in the winter - double brrrrrr), Nevada, rural Colorado, etc. I met several couples who were 'job shopping'. They would take an assignment (both of them) with a company that needed temporary help for 2 to 3 years. When the crisis was over, so were their jobs - but they had another one lined up by then. One pair had worked in 18 different parts of the US over their career together - about 2 to 3 years at each job. They had decided where they wanted to retire, having sampled lots of different locations during their careers together. Best of luck...
 
 
 
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