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    • Thread Starter
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    Hi,

    I've been aiming to start learning Java for the past few months, but due to school and a busy schedule, I haven't been able to get around to making a start as of yet. So I thought I'd ask on the forums for any advice, tips or useful sites that can help to introduce the language or contain easy-to-follow guides.

    Anyways, I'd appreciate any help that anyone gives so feel free to leave a reply.

    - Kathleen

    P.S. I am aware that it will take a long time and a lot of dedication to reach the desired level of proficiency in Java that I am aiming for!
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    It will take time, and it might not always be easy, but there's plenty of help out there!

    A good place just to quickly get started without needing to install or download anything would be the interactive course on Codecademy:
    https://www.codecademy.com/learn/learn-java

    At some point, you'll want to actually install and run programs on your own computer though, so I'd also look at the following too:

    - It's a good idea to follow the get started by downloading and installing Java and the JDK (Java Development Kit) - here's the official Java website:
    http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/to...rn-141096.html

    - Get yourself a development environment. There are a lot of these around, just pick one (Personally I like IntelliJ for Java, many other people use Eclipse, and the official documentation recommends NetBeans (although I think NetBeans has been left behind slightly as of late - it hasn't been updated in over a year.. there are others too though):

    IntelliJ - https://www.jetbrains.com/idea/
    Also, you will need to read the "getting started" guide for IntelliJ, because there are a few set-up steps:
    https://www.jetbrains.com/help/idea/...plication.html

    ..Or..
    Eclipse - https://www.eclipse.org/downloads/pa...velopers/lunar
    (getting started guide here: http://help.eclipse.org/oxygen/index.jsp?nav=%2F1 )

    .. Or..
    NetBeans - https://netbeans.org/
    (NetBeans setup guide is in the official oracle Java docs I linked above)

    ... Or... (lastly)
    I know that a lot of courses use BlueJ, so if you find yourself following a course which needs this, then you can get it here -
    https://www.bluej.org/


    Then, once you're all set up, take a look at some other online Java courses, such as these on edX:
    https://www.edx.org/course/subject/c...r-science/java

    Also, consider buying a Java book if you have any money to spend - Head First Java is a decent introduction - http://www.headfirstlabs.com/books/hfjava/

    Lastly, if you ever get stuck, just searching google will unearth a massive amount of information. If you find yourself struggling with specific problems and specific concepts in Java itself, you can ask questions on https://stackoverflow.com/ which will reach a huge audience of Java programmers

    Good luck!
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    I used a For Dummies book to start learning Java, at the time I didn't think much about IDEs and programmed using the command line and text editor
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    (Original post by shawn_o1)
    I used a For Dummies book to start learning Java, at the time I didn't think much about IDEs and programmed using the command line and text editor
    Yeah, a lot of old books do this. Back when the book was written, it probably made sense at the time because the authors didn't want to include loads of information about how to use the IDE. These days, IDEs have moved on a long way, and have become quite a bit more beginner-friendly - but most importantly, the documentation you get online for the IDEs has improved a lot, so it's fairly easy now just to pick up an IDE as a beginner and jump straight in to writing code.

    The problem with trying to learn to program without an IDE is that it's a bit like trying to learn with an arm tied behind your back - the IDE gives you tools like auto-complete, syntax highlighting, underlining, easy usage of the debugger, etc. learning without those things just makes the whole thing more frustrating and time-consuming, and just slows down the whole process.
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    If you're going to code in Java then use IntelliJ Idea, people that use Eclipse/BlueJ/NetBeans are just weird
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    Consider taking a udemy online bootcamp. I would recommend: https://www.udemy.com/learn-java-se-...ssociate-exam/
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    (Original post by winterscoming)
    It will take time, and it might not always be easy, but there's plenty of help out there!

    A good place just to quickly get started without needing to install or download anything would be the interactive course on Codecademy:
    https://www.codecademy.com/learn/learn-java

    At some point, you'll want to actually install and run programs on your own computer though, so I'd also look at the following too:

    - It's a good idea to follow the get started by downloading and installing Java and the JDK (Java Development Kit) - here's the official Java website:
    http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/to...rn-141096.html

    - Get yourself a development environment. There are a lot of these around, just pick one (Personally I like IntelliJ for Java, many other people use Eclipse, and the official documentation recommends NetBeans (although I think NetBeans has been left behind slightly as of late - it hasn't been updated in over a year.. there are others too though):

    IntelliJ - https://www.jetbrains.com/idea/
    Also, you will need to read the "getting started" guide for IntelliJ, because there are a few set-up steps:
    https://www.jetbrains.com/help/idea/...plication.html

    ..Or..
    Eclipse - https://www.eclipse.org/downloads/pa...velopers/lunar
    (getting started guide here: http://help.eclipse.org/oxygen/index.jsp?nav=%2F1 )

    .. Or..
    NetBeans - https://netbeans.org/
    (NetBeans setup guide is in the official oracle Java docs I linked above)

    ... Or... (lastly)
    I know that a lot of courses use BlueJ, so if you find yourself following a course which needs this, then you can get it here -
    https://www.bluej.org/


    Then, once you're all set up, take a look at some other online Java courses, such as these on edX:
    https://www.edx.org/course/subject/c...r-science/java

    Also, consider buying a Java book if you have any money to spend - Head First Java is a decent introduction - http://www.headfirstlabs.com/books/hfjava/

    Lastly, if you ever get stuck, just searching google will unearth a massive amount of information. If you find yourself struggling with specific problems and specific concepts in Java itself, you can ask questions on https://stackoverflow.com/ which will reach a huge audience of Java programmers

    Good luck!
    ^.
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    (Original post by winterscoming)
    It will take time, and it might not always be easy, but there's plenty of help out there!

    A good place just to quickly get started without needing to install or download anything would be the interactive course on Codecademy:
    https://www.codecademy.com/learn/learn-java

    At some point, you'll want to actually install and run programs on your own computer though, so I'd also look at the following too:

    - It's a good idea to follow the get started by downloading and installing Java and the JDK (Java Development Kit) - here's the official Java website:
    http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/to...rn-141096.html

    - Get yourself a development environment. There are a lot of these around, just pick one (Personally I like IntelliJ for Java, many other people use Eclipse, and the official documentation recommends NetBeans (although I think NetBeans has been left behind slightly as of late - it hasn't been updated in over a year.. there are others too though):

    IntelliJ - https://www.jetbrains.com/idea/
    Also, you will need to read the "getting started" guide for IntelliJ, because there are a few set-up steps:
    https://www.jetbrains.com/help/idea/...plication.html

    ..Or..
    Eclipse - https://www.eclipse.org/downloads/pa...velopers/lunar
    (getting started guide here: http://help.eclipse.org/oxygen/index.jsp?nav=%2F1 )

    .. Or..
    NetBeans - https://netbeans.org/
    (NetBeans setup guide is in the official oracle Java docs I linked above)

    ... Or... (lastly)
    I know that a lot of courses use BlueJ, so if you find yourself following a course which needs this, then you can get it here -
    https://www.bluej.org/


    Then, once you're all set up, take a look at some other online Java courses, such as these on edX:
    https://www.edx.org/course/subject/c...r-science/java

    Also, consider buying a Java book if you have any money to spend - Head First Java is a decent introduction - http://www.headfirstlabs.com/books/hfjava/

    Lastly, if you ever get stuck, just searching google will unearth a massive amount of information. If you find yourself struggling with specific problems and specific concepts in Java itself, you can ask questions on https://stackoverflow.com/ which will reach a huge audience of Java programmers

    Good luck!
    (Original post by shawn_o1)
    I used a For Dummies book to start learning Java, at the time I didn't think much about IDEs and programmed using the command line and text editor
    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    Consider taking a udemy online bootcamp. I would recommend: https://www.udemy.com/learn-java-se-...ssociate-exam/
    Thanks a lot everyone for the useful tips/links, looks like there'll be a lot of learning ahead of me
    • TSR Group Staff
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    This is an excellent Java book, but also useful for any object-oriented programming language: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Effective-J...sap_bc?ie=UTF8
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    (Original post by Monkey Monkeyson)
    This is an excellent Java book, but also useful for any object-oriented programming language: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Effective-J...sap_bc?ie=UTF8
    Yeah, books like this are gold dust once you get past the newbie/novice stuff and want to start learning to be a better programmer The kinds of things in this book are usually the sorts of things which nobody ever really mentions at Uni or on intro programming courses - then as soon as you have to write code for a bigger, non-trivial project, then a lot of the advice and guidelines in here end up saving you from doing all the wrong things.
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    There are loads of great websites for leaning to code at the minute, (codecademy etc) many of them only teach you the bare bones though. I really like hackerrank as it doesn't baby you through the lessons, it makes you go out and search for solutions to your problems like you would in the real world.
 
 
 
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