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    I have a French oral coming up and I'm really struggling with learning the content, I keep reading over it and saying it out loud again and again but it won't go in. In my last oral I went in and messed up and I really need to do well in this one to pull up my grade. Can anyone please suggest any techniques to help me learn it?
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    (Original post by Ali.xx)
    I have a French oral coming up and I'm really struggling with learning the content, I keep reading over it and saying it out loud again and again but it won't go in. In my last oral I went in and messed up and I really need to do well in this one to pull up my grade. Can anyone please suggest any techniques to help me learn it?
    You could ask your teacher to read it and record it on your phone to listen to, that always helps me.
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    Yep, ask your teacher to record it, or even better, ask your native language assistant to record it, if you have one. Your language assistant could also help you with any pronunciation difficulties you may have. You could play the recording on loop when you have some downtime or when you are drifting off to sleep.

    As regards learning off answers, add visual aids to make them more memorable, such as doodles or different coloured pens. If you have a long piece to learn, arrange sentences in different positions on a page so you can visualise the content, like you would a map.

    Get your family to do lots of practice spoken exams with you and record yourself to see how much you remember.
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    I would recommend finding a 'walking dictionary'. Make sure your dictionary speaks the target language properly. In your case, a well educated male from France [NOT north Africa], should do nicely [i presume from your name you are female]. I once invested in an Italian course from Berlitz. Now they are [improperly] credited with being able to teach languages. NOT SO!! After studying for several months, i traveled to Italy to visit a former classmate at uni, and took her and her mother out to dinner my first night there. I let them order - i couldn't manage that. After the waitress got the order, she obviously asked if there was anything else. Feeling the need of the local plumbing, i asked: "Si, dove il ritirada"?? My friend's mother gasped, and looked at the ceiling. The waitress blushed, and me friend kicked me under the table, saying: "Don't EVER say that again"!! It turned out that that was perhaps the crudest possible way to ask the question in Italian. Fortunately, i had my book (from the record course) with me. My friend looked through it, and in the "in the shop" section, told me: "That's NOT how you talk to a shop assistant, that's the way an Italian businessman would talk to his MISTRESS!!" The rest of the book was similar foolishness. I never used the records (or book) again. Be careful!! I would recommend checking out any material with a native speaker - that speaks a 'well educated' version of the language, before you use it. Best of luck!!
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    Practice not just reading it but also saying it without looking and making those connections in your brain as to what the words actually mean.

    Memorising vocab or sentences isn’t the same as your brain actually understanding how to put sentences together and use vocab correctly.

    I have a degree in French and live in France now but I struggled a lot at school with French because I felt it was all reading and memorisation and I didn’t really understand the language well.

    I’m taking a chinese classes now and the way it is taught is so much more practical so that I am taught to use the language more than just memorise stuff.

    To help for this anyway the comments are good are great. If nobody can record it for you record yourself and listen to it.

    Try and find a pen pal on mylanguageexchange.com you could write to each other or maybe Skype too (though you are supposed to be at least 18 to join so it might be complicated). Maybe then you can get them to help you in return for helping them with English.

    I don’t know how strict the grading is but I work with French students and honestly their grammar mistakes in English aren’t usually a problem. To speak good English it’s important to speak slowly, clearly, and inunciate the words well. Then the grammar mistakes aren’t important for the most part. The same applies to French too.
    Moreover, students who don’t read a script or rely on memorising answers have a far better level of oral English than those who do.

    Hope this can help a little bit... try not to stress too much. I know it’s hard! I would get Es in my a level oral exams but now my French is quite good (i don’t mean to not sound modest but I mean I think the examination system is flawed as it suggests if you do badly then you will never do better later on but you can)
 
 
 
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