_MB_
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#1
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Could somebody please explain to me why an Up, Strange, Anti-Strange Baryon cannot exist. I can't seem to figure it out!

Thanks in advance, any help is appreciated.
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phys981
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Each quark has a baryon number of 1/3, anti-quarks are -1/3

Baryons have to have a baryon number of 1 or -1 altogether and mixing quarks with antiquarks doesn't give this.

That, I suspect, is the answer.
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yusyus
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(Original post by _MB_)
Could somebody please explain to me why an Up, Strange, Anti-Strange Baryon cannot exist. I can't seem to figure it out!

Thanks in advance, any help is appreciated.
I guess charge has to be an integer?
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black1blade
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Well baryons can only have either all matter or all antimatter particles.
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Dysf(x)al
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(Original post by _MB_)
Could somebody please explain to me why an Up, Strange, Anti-Strange Baryon cannot exist. I can't seem to figure it out!

Thanks in advance, any help is appreciated.
Baryons are always either three quarks or three antiquarks. If you try to do anything else, you end up with a total baryon number of 1/3 or -1/3, neither of which can exist.
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