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    I'm struggling to think of many strengths. I've come up with 3 which I think are correct.

    1.Humans are of the highest moral standard(can you use religious quotes to back this up as it's a secular theory??)

    2.Fair that future generations can enjoy a healthy standard of living.

    3.Holistic view allows for sustainable future.

    Can't really think of many more, can somebody help please?
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    (Original post by dont know it)
    I'm struggling to think of many strengths. I've come up with 3 which I think are correct.

    1.Humans are of the highest moral standard(can you use religious quotes to back this up as it's a secular theory??)

    2.Fair that future generations can enjoy a healthy standard of living.

    3.Holistic view allows for sustainable future.

    Can't really think of many more, can somebody help please?
    What do you mean by strengths? Why is number 1 a strength?
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    (Original post by pjm600)
    What do you mean by strengths? Why is number 1 a strength?
    It's mainly me stretching at straws honestly. I think it would link to religious viewpoints mainly so God created man in his own image showing our importance compared to other species. Thinking about it now it doesn't really make sense.
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    (Original post by dont know it)
    It's mainly me stretching at straws honestly. I think it would link to religious viewpoints mainly so God created man in his own image showing our importance compared to other species. Thinking about it now it doesn't really make sense.
    Still not sure what you're really looking for in terms of strengths. I guess you're asking 'what's good about it', but the answer depends on your broader perspective.

    For example, an idea from a pragmatic perspective might be that shallow ecology lets humans 'get on' and develop (e.g. improve food production and reduce poverty) without the need to get tied up in debates that might be seen as entirely academic and abstract of reality (e.g. starving children). Related to this you could make the paternalistic argument that man knows best, so to speak, in relation to sustainability.

    As you say there is a connection to christian old testament principle of man as stewards (e.g. Gen 1:28, Gen 2:15 etc). Certainly this is a strength in terms of coalition building.

    Secondly you could argue that the ideas of deep ecology are incompatible with humans' anthropocentric tendencies. Conversely shallow ecology integrates anthropocentric and environmental issues. This integration could be seen as harnessing humans' persistent anthropocentric efforts in a way that could be mutually beneficial for both humans and the environment.
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    (Original post by pjm600)
    Still not sure what you're really looking for in terms of strengths. I guess you're asking 'what's good about it', but the answer depends on your broader perspective.

    For example, an idea from a pragmatic perspective might be that shallow ecology lets humans 'get on' and develop (e.g. improve food production and reduce poverty) without the need to get tied up in debates that might be seen as entirely academic and abstract of reality (e.g. starving children). Related to this you could make the paternalistic argument that man knows best, so to speak, in relation to sustainability.

    As you say there is a connection to christian old testament principle of man as stewards (e.g. Gen 1:28, Gen 2:15 etc). Certainly this is a strength in terms of coalition building.

    Secondly you could argue that the ideas of deep ecology are incompatible with humans' anthropocentric tendencies. Conversely shallow ecology integrates anthropocentric and environmental issues. This integration could be seen as harnessing humans' persistent anthropocentric efforts in a way that could be mutually beneficial for both humans and the environment.
    Thanks. This was what I was looking for, really helpful. One question though.
    As you say, there's a connection to the Christian old testament, but given that it's a secular theory do you think linking it to religion would be correct if you were giving strength's(what's good about it).
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    (Original post by dont know it)
    Thanks. This was what I was looking for, really helpful. One question though.
    As you say, there's a connection to the Christian old testament, but given that it's a secular theory do you think linking it to religion would be correct if you were giving strength's(what's good about it).
    Without wanting to sound like a broken record, it depends what you mean by what's good about it!

    Perhaps it is a strength in the sense that it integrates well with other belief systems. But this isn't really a strength in the sense that it makes the concept 'good'.
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    (Original post by pjm600)
    Without wanting to sound like a broken record, it depends what you mean by what's good about it!

    Perhaps it is a strength in the sense that it integrates well with other belief systems. But this isn't really a strength in the sense that it makes the concept 'good'.
    I think I worded it incorrectly. Given shallow ecology is a non religious based theory and the question asks for its strengths, would it be correct to talk about religion assuming what you just said is a strength. Essentially my main concern is linking religion to something that's not based on religion.
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    (Original post by dont know it)
    I think I worded it incorrectly. Given shallow ecology is a non religious based theory and the question asks for its strengths, would it be correct to talk about religion assuming what you just said is a strength. Essentially my main concern is linking religion to something that's not based on religion.
    In short, no. The reason is because a religious argument often relies on premises that remain untested (viz. faith), whereas secular theories usually try to avoid this, and so by evoking a religious argument, you run the risk of moving a testable or reasoned thesis to an untestable or unreasoned one.
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    (Original post by gjd800)
    In short, no. The reason is because a religious argument often relies on premises that remain untested (viz. faith), whereas secular theories usually try to avoid this, and so by evoking a religious argument, you run the risk of moving a testable or reasoned thesis to an untestable or unreasoned one.
    So helpful. Thank you.
 
 
 
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