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    Hi,

    My apologies in advance for the lengthy post but I am need of guidance.

    I am 28 years old and I have no idea what to do right now. I completed my LLB undergraduate in 2013, with 2.1, (finished with 69%, I was 1% off from a 1st as I messed up one of my coursework which still hurts till this day).

    I graduated quite late. Once I finished my GCSE’s, I enrolled and did A levels. However I was suffering from depression, did not do great. I took a year out to get my head straight and then re-enrolled in college when I was 18. I did a BTEC, National Diploma Level 3 course which I earned DDD. Based on that, I enrolled and did my undergraduate at Hertfordshire University. I did not apply elsewhere because I was not comfortable leaving home and living far away.

    After I graduated, I was unemployed for about 10 months before I got a job in a software tech company. I did everything from being a PA to the company owner, from doing employees’ salaries and also doing employment contact for new starters which was my first legal experience. It was my first experience in seeing what a tech company did, it was an amazing experience.

    While I enjoyed the job, the money was not great and any future postgraduate, I wanted to pay for myself. I then applied and got a job at the UK leading Estate Agency Head Office. For the last 3 years, I have been working as a customer service advisor in the Compliance department.

    While working, I did my Masters in Employments Law at Kingston University, part time. I admit, it was hard to jump straight back into education after a gap and working full time. It was also a commitment to travel there, sometimes from home or from work. My employers were understanding and I used my holidays to be able to do this. I did suffer from depression badly in my last year. I started my last module, my dissertation research in January 2017, I had until October 2017 to submit it. My depression got so bad, I did not do my dissertation until September 2017. I did about 14,000 Dissertation in a month and got 54 out of 100. It was one of the most stressful time of my life. My one regret here was, I wished I started it months ago, seeing my score, I know I could have done well. Anyway, despite my shocking score from my dissertation, because I had done well on my others modules, first and 2.1 in my coursework, I ended up with a Merit in my masters.

    Now, my goal was always to do the LPC. I was accepted at the College of Law in 2017, but I felt burned out from working, doing my masters and recovering from depression, I wanted a break.

    The crux of the issue is, I feel I am having a mid-life crisis, even though I am 28. I spent so my time on law, money and I feel that there is no end in sight. I have read so many stories about people not getting a training contract and I ask myself, before spending £17k+ on a LPC, what happens if I don’t succeed.

    I enjoyed Employment Law the most and considered specialising in that area. However I am having doubts.

    It has got to the point where I have told my parents, I don’t want to pursue this any further. I told them, I actually want a career in I.T.

    I know it’s strange but other than law, I.T is another of my passion. 6 years ago, I decided, I wanted to build my computer. I did not want to buy a pre-built computer so after months of research, watching YouTube videos, I built my first computer and it still works fine till this date. I am planning to upgrade in the next few months when Ryzen 2 comes out.

    Anyway, a friend asked me, what do I see myself doing in 10 years’ time. A career in law or a potential career in IT. When I asked myself that, I realise I be more happy in a career doing something IT related than law. While I enjoyed doing law, I feel maybe I just followed the current trend, parent’s expectations and what my family expected of me. I be more happier to sit in front of a computer.

    So here I am at 28 years old, looking for advice. The great thing about working at my employment, since there is so many departments, you can switch to a job and they are great about career advancements. One of the jobs I have seen is 1st line Helpline Desk in IT. I have looked at the criteria, spoke to a colleague who is a 2nd line analyst and he has said to me, I have a good chance of getting the job. Also I want to speak with my manager into moving to the IT department. Before I do this, I wanted advice from you.

    Do you think it’s stupid of me to change a career without even giving it a chance? Or, should I pursue a career that I enjoy. Bear in mind, while I am knowledgeable on building a computer, I don’t have any experience in IT. I have found software or network engineering to be interesting. I have even started to look into coding and learning languages. At the moment, I have started to look into Python. But I am getting a head of myself.

    If I pursue a career in IT, do you think switching my job internally from the compliance department to IT is a good first step? Build up my knowledge. Furthermore, I was thinking of pursing a 2nd degree which I will fund myself, part time in Computer Science. Is this necessary? Or would it be better to get training qualifications. I don’t want to choose a career in law for the sake of potential prestige, salary. I want to do a job that I would be happy in and can see myself doing for the rest of my career. Plus, I like the ability of working from home, at work location or even around the world. A career in IT seems less restricting than a career in Law.

    I am sorry for such a lengthy post but I feel, if I am going to decide what to do, I need to do it now. I don’t want to waste time. My parents are really supportive hear, they told me to do what ever makes me happy. But nonetheless, I don't want my parents to worry about and I want to be able to explain to them, my future long term goals.

    Any help/guidance would be much appreciate especially, I have no ideal how to pursue a career in I.T.

    Thank you.
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    (Original post by mumihp)
    Hi,

    My apologies in advance for the lengthy post but I am need of guidance.

    I am 28 years old and I have no idea what to do right now. I completed my LLB undergraduate in 2013, with 2.1, (finished with 69%, I was 1% off from a 1st as I messed up one of my coursework which still hurts till this day).

    I graduated quite late. Once I finished my GCSE’s, I enrolled and did A levels. However I was suffering from depression, did not do great. I took a year out to get my head straight and then re-enrolled in college when I was 18. I did a BTEC, National Diploma Level 3 course which I earned DDD. Based on that, I enrolled and did my undergraduate at Hertfordshire University. I did not apply elsewhere because I was not comfortable leaving home and living far away.

    After I graduated, I was unemployed for about 10 months before I got a job in a software tech company. I did everything from being a PA to the company owner, from doing employees’ salaries and also doing employment contact for new starters which was my first legal experience. It was my first experience in seeing what a tech company did, it was an amazing experience.

    While I enjoyed the job, the money was not great and any future postgraduate, I wanted to pay for myself. I then applied and got a job at the UK leading Estate Agency Head Office. For the last 3 years, I have been working as a customer service advisor in the Compliance department.

    While working, I did my Masters in Employments Law at Kingston University, part time. I admit, it was hard to jump straight back into education after a gap and working full time. It was also a commitment to travel there, sometimes from home or from work. My employers were understanding and I used my holidays to be able to do this. I did suffer from depression badly in my last year. I started my last module, my dissertation research in January 2017, I had until October 2017 to submit it. My depression got so bad, I did not do my dissertation until September 2017. I did about 14,000 Dissertation in a month and got 54 out of 100. It was one of the most stressful time of my life. My one regret here was, I wished I started it months ago, seeing my score, I know I could have done well. Anyway, despite my shocking score from my dissertation, because I had done well on my others modules, first and 2.1 in my coursework, I ended up with a Merit in my masters.

    Now, my goal was always to do the LPC. I was accepted at the College of Law in 2017, but I felt burned out from working, doing my masters and recovering from depression, I wanted a break.

    The crux of the issue is, I feel I am having a mid-life crisis, even though I am 28. I spent so my time on law, money and I feel that there is no end in sight. I have read so many stories about people not getting a training contract and I ask myself, before spending £17k+ on a LPC, what happens if I don’t succeed.

    I enjoyed Employment Law the most and considered specialising in that area. However I am having doubts.

    It has got to the point where I have told my parents, I don’t want to pursue this any further. I told them, I actually want a career in I.T.

    I know it’s strange but other than law, I.T is another of my passion. 6 years ago, I decided, I wanted to build my computer. I did not want to buy a pre-built computer so after months of research, watching YouTube videos, I built my first computer and it still works fine till this date. I am planning to upgrade in the next few months when Ryzen 2 comes out.

    Anyway, a friend asked me, what do I see myself doing in 10 years’ time. A career in law or a potential career in IT. When I asked myself that, I realise I be more happy in a career doing something IT related than law. While I enjoyed doing law, I feel maybe I just followed the current trend, parent’s expectations and what my family expected of me. I be more happier to sit in front of a computer.

    So here I am at 28 years old, looking for advice. The great thing about working at my employment, since there is so many departments, you can switch to a job and they are great about career advancements. One of the jobs I have seen is 1st line Helpline Desk in IT. I have looked at the criteria, spoke to a colleague who is a 2nd line analyst and he has said to me, I have a good chance of getting the job. Also I want to speak with my manager into moving to the IT department. Before I do this, I wanted advice from you.

    Do you think it’s stupid of me to change a career without even giving it a chance? Or, should I pursue a career that I enjoy. Bear in mind, while I am knowledgeable on building a computer, I don’t have any experience in IT. I have found software or network engineering to be interesting. I have even started to look into coding and learning languages. At the moment, I have started to look into Python. But I am getting a head of myself.

    If I pursue a career in IT, do you think switching my job internally from the compliance department to IT is a good first step? Build up my knowledge. Furthermore, I was thinking of pursing a 2nd degree which I will fund myself, part time in Computer Science. Is this necessary? Or would it be better to get training qualifications. I don’t want to choose a career in law for the sake of potential prestige, salary. I want to do a job that I would be happy in and can see myself doing for the rest of my career. Plus, I like the ability of working from home, at work location or even around the world. A career in IT seems less restricting than a career in Law.

    I am sorry for such a lengthy post but I feel, if I am going to decide what to do, I need to do it now. I don’t want to waste time. My parents are really supportive hear, they told me to do what ever makes me happy. But nonetheless, I don't want my parents to worry about and I want to be able to explain to them, my future long term goals.

    Any help/guidance would be much appreciate especially, I have no ideal how to pursue a career in I.T.

    Thank you.
    I won't talk about the law side as I dont have much knowledge on it but maybe J-SP may be able to offer advice on that

    As for the IT side

    1. if you think you're going to be happier in IT do IT
    2. If you're interested in the software development side of things (I assume you are as you mentioned doing a comp sci degree which isnt hardware based really) there is no real need for you to do a comp sci degree, you can teach yourself how to program, learn the bits of comp sci you need (ie databases etc), learn a couple of languages + a framework, build some apps, programs etc to put in a portfolio and then once you have a good portfolio (this is your evidence you can program) apply for software developer jobs
    - there are plenty of resources online to show you how to program, both paid and free
    3. Software development is decently paid so if you think you will prefer this over law then go for it
    4. Go for the IT jobs if you want but I dont think they will help too much in terms of getting software dev jobs (unless they have programming involved, I assume they dont) but they wont hurt as you need a day job while you learn to program

    Edit: There are also MANY software developers on youtube that tell you about the various routes to become a software developer/engineer, watch those too
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    Very long post!

    But yes, based on what you have said I would switch to IT. There’s little point pursuing a career purely based on your journey before - you should be looking forward not backwards.

    Plus if you are prone to depression, clearly being happy and healthy is more vital, for your own sake but also for your job. If you are more interested or enjoy IT more, then this is a no brainer to me.
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    A second degree might be an option, but somebody looking to employ you will care more about your technical skills/ability. There are a huge number of people working across many different sectors of IT who have never studied Computer Science or any other similar technical subject at university. Academic credentials just don't hold much weight when compared with raw technical and problem solving ability.

    Just on a historical note - computer science degrees only became widely available in the past 30 years or so - before then, there were only a small handful of universities which would offer it as a subject, but IT professionals have been in existence for much longer. Just to put things into context, neither Steve Jobs nor Bill Gates, arguably the two most successful IT professionals in history, even had the opportunity to study computer science at university - Bill Gates actually started out studying for a Law degree, but he dropped out of his university course to create Microsoft instead.

    Back to reality - It would be fair to say that there's a very long way to go from tinkering with computers in your spare time to having the technical and problem solving skill for an employer to seriously consider hiring you, but there are plenty of different ways to go about picking up technical skills. A degree is certainly a viable option, but it's also a very expensive and probably quite a slow option too (if you started a full-time degree in Sept 2018, you wouldn't even begin looking for work until 2021, and a degree won't focus just on technical skills, but it will give you a solid grounding in a lot of very useful theory and problem solving skills)

    You could have a look around your local area for other courses which might be more technically focused and hands-on. The main advantage of studying on a course is having access to a tutor, and having a course structure to follow.

    Another good option would be to follow some online courses; the big advantage of these, aside from being much cheaper (often free), being that you could do these at your own pace while you're still in full-time employment, and therefore aren't going to need to worry about taking on even more student debt for your living costs. If you're planning on working in an IT technical support job while teaching yourself other skills, then this might be a better route.

    Have a look at the edX website - it has some excellent courses for all kinds of things - for example, there's a free Introductory Computer Science course, written by Harvard professors here:
    https://www.edx.org/course/cs50s-int...harvardx-cs50x

    And a similar one for Python here:
    https://www.edx.org/course/introduct...itx-6-00-1x-11

    Also, if you're interested in networking, you could consider studying for a professional Cisco certification - these are very intense, somewhat expensive, and certainly not easy, but they're extremely valuable to anybody wanting a career in networking and/or security:
    https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/traini...fications.html

    (Also, have a look around your local area in case there are any Cisco partner academies - there are a lot of centres which offer face-to-face classes for Cisco courses)

    Of course, whichever path you take won't be quick or easy, but I think you already realise this, so as long as you're willing to put in the time and effort, changing to a new career is a perfectly normal thing to do. You're certainly not the first person to get partway through your life and decide to try something new - at 28, you've still got about 40 years left of your working life, so it's really important that you choose something you enjoy.

    Good luck!
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    Lol, sorry for the long post, I wanted to get some true advice on my entire circumstances. I wanted to thank everyone who provided me advice/guidance. I have a clear ideal on where I want to go. I decided against a degree and in my free team, I will be be learning the computer languages. I want to be able to transition into a IT Roles within my employment. However I decided, I will keep Employment law as a back up career since it's a good ideal to keep my options open.
    Anyway, thanks everyone.
 
 
 
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