What do I do after I get my offers back?

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Anonymous #1
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Report Thread starter 3 years ago
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I've got 2 conditional and 2 unconditional offers. Am I meant to pick one of each? What's the difference between firm and insurance? If I put a conditional and an unconditional and I get the grade for the conditional, does that mean I can't go to the unconditional?
I know these are dumb questions but no one has explained it to me, so please explain it to me like I'm 5.
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stoyfan
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I've got 2 conditional and 2 unconditional offers. Am I meant to pick one of each? What's the difference between firm and insurance? If I put a conditional and an unconditional and I get the grade for the conditional, does that mean I can't go to the unconditional?
I know these are dumb questions but no one has explained it to me, so please explain it to me like I'm 5.
An unconditional offer means that if you accept it, then that means that you have a place even if you somehow didn't get the predicted grades.

A conditional offer means that if you accept the offer, then you would need to get the required grades if you want to get a place.

As a result, with conditional offers you will have to choose a firm and insurance offer.

A firm offer is the uni that you want to go to. Therefore, if you meet the requirements for that firm offer, then by default, you will get a place from that uni.

An insurance offer is the backup option incase you didn't meet the grade requirements of that firm offer, however, you would still need to get the required grades of the insurance offer if you want to get into that uni.

Of course, a unconditional offer may seem enticing, but be warned that a reason why they have given you the offer is because the uni desperately needs more students.


Obviously, there are no insurance and firms for unconditional offers.
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AspiringUnderdog
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(Original post by stoyfan)
An unconditional offer means that if you accept it, then that means that you have a place even if you somehow didn't get the predicted grades.

A conditional offer means that if you accept the offer, then you would need to get the required grades if you want to get a place.

As a result, with conditional offers you will have to choose a firm and insurance offer.

A firm offer is the uni that you want to go to. Therefore, if you meet the requirements for that firm offer, then by default, you will get a place from that uni.

An insurance offer is the backup option incase you didn't meet the grade requirements of that firm offer, however, you would still need to get the required grades of the insurance offer if you want to get into that uni.

Of course, a unconditional offer may seem enticing, but be warned that a reason why they have given you a conditional offer is because the uni desperately needs more students.


Obviously, there are no insurance and firms for conditional offers.
Shouldn't the last two lines say unconditional not conditional?

Also my cousin has an insurance unconditional last year. It's rare but can happen.
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stoyfan
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(Original post by AspiringUnderdog)
Shouldn't the last two lines say unconditional not conditional?

Also my cousin has an insurance unconditional last year. It's rare but can happen.
I edited my post. It seems that it hasn't updated for you yet.
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AspiringUnderdog
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(Original post by stoyfan)
I edited my post. It seems that it hasn't updated for you yet.
It says that you've edited it but still shows: "but be warned that a reason why they have given you a conditional offer is because the uni desperately needs more students.


Obviously, there are no insurance and firms for conditional offers."
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stoyfan
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(Original post by AspiringUnderdog)
It says that you've edited it but still shows: "but be warned that a reason why they have given you a conditional offer is because the uni desperately needs more students.


Obviously, there are no insurance and firms for conditional offers."
Fixed, thanks.
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AspiringUnderdog
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(Original post by stoyfan)
Fixed, thanks.

"Of course, a unconditional offer may seem enticing, but be warned that a reason why they have given you a conditional offer is because the uni desperately needs more students."

What about this? Wouldn't it be unconditional is desperation not conditional?
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