Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    How far does Shakespeare present Lord Capulet as a good father?

    Throughtout Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare presents Lord Capulet as a good father to an extent through his actions.

    In Act 1 Scene 2, the audience has an impression that Lord Capulet is a considerate and caring father. Through the use of the agrarian metaphor 'too soon marred are those so early made', Shakespeare might be showing how Lord Capulet feels that he is marring Juliet's virginity and forcing her into motherhood. Also, he feels she is 'too ripe to be a bride' and 'has not yet seen the change of fourteen years'. In the Elizabethan era, girls were wedded as young as twelve, so Lord Capulet calling Juliet too young would surprise a Shakespearean audience. As if he was voicing the audience's astonishment, Paris says 'younger than she are happy mothers made'. Moreover, Lord Capulet's excuses to delay Juliet's marriage shows him as reluctant to marry her off due to the fact Juliet is 'the hopeful lady of his Earth' and his only child.

    As a father, his power over Juliet's marriage is shown with how he has many lines compared to Paris in a discussion about Juliet's marriage. Unconventionally, Lord Capulet continues to say that if Paris wills to marry Juliet, '[his] will lies in [her] consent'. Through the use of the rhyming couplets: 'within her scope of choice, lies my consent and fair according voice', Shakespeare links both Juliet and Lord Capulet's consent. Also, in a patriarchal society, this shows Juliet can only express her opinions through her father's 'fair and according voice' because as a woman she is powerless. Nevertheless, despite the patriarchal society, Lord Capulet breaks from the Elizabethan tradition of arranged marriage and gives Juliet a choice for her suitor, not alluding to the misogynistic views in the era that women were too weak to make decisions.

    Typically, a good father is one who provides his daughter with the basic necessities of life and a good standard of living. Through the nurse's remarks: '[Juliet] would have the chinks or in other words, she is wealthy, Shakespeare conveys that Old Capulet has provided her with good wealth and money. Therefore, in this way, he is a good father.

    In Act 3 Scene 4, Lady Capulet describes Juliet as 'mewed with the heaviness' by which she presumes from Tybalt's death. Suddenly, Capulet takes on a dictatorial position over Juliet declaring '[Juliet] will be ruled in all respects by me'. Feeling that Juliet will agree with him, he arranges her marriage. The audience may be shocked at how he is no longer the considerate father asking his daughter for her consent, however, Lord Capulet has good intentions and wishes to take his daughter's mind of her sorrow with marriage. Even more, in Act 1 Juliet says 'I'll look to like ... but no more deep will I endart my eye than your consent gives strength to fly'. Here, she says that she will agree to anything her parents consent to so it is no surprise that Lord Capulet did not bother asking his daughter. Nonetheless, as Paris was a relative of the prince, one could argue that by marrying Juliet to him, Lord Capulet felt he could escalate his status above the Montagues and this was just a selfish act for his social gain.

    Like most of the events in the play, he hastily arranges Juliet's marriage. Similar to how Romeo and Juliet's love, which Juliet felt was 'too sudden' and 'quick', is destined for tragedy, Lord Capulet's marriage arrangement does not end well either. Through the theme of haste, Shakespeare conveys the disorder within the play which contrasts with the fixed ordered nature of fate. Shocked at Juliet's disobedience and change in mind, Lord Capulet begins to verbally abuse Juliet calling her a 'wretch' and 'a green-sickness carrion'. By dehumanising Juliet, she is made inferior and powerless compared to Lord Capulet - the patriarch of the Capulets. Again, Capulet is given much more lines than the other characters and so the power of voice which shows what a powerful character he is. Ironically, Lord Capulet associates 'green sickness' - the sickness of virgins - with Juliet who the audience know has presumably just had consummation with Romeo. Through dramatic irony, Shakespeare shows how Juliet's parents are distant from her as well as not being as good parents as they think they are. Also, as green sickness was a sickness with a green tinge which prevented people from getting married, Cpaulet is saying that Juliet is unworthy of marraige and uses derogatory terms for her which portrays him as an abusive father.

    In the same scene, the dramatisation of Juliet kneeling down shows her lack of power within society in addition to how she is powerless as she belongs to her father. Juliet is no longer on a 'balcony' or 'aloft' but down; she has fallen. According to Aristotle idea of a tragedy, she is a tragic character and Shakespeare brings in the tragic element to this play. This stage direction also shows how Lord Capulet had become more dictatorial and how his attitude towards Juliet has changed. Though this may be because he is shocked at her disobedience and feels he should compel her in a bid to increase his own power and status, it may also be because he could not comprehend why Juliet had suddenly changed her views on her marriage and felt that perhaps her disobedience signalled her transition from childhood to adulthood as well as acting in that way because. Maybe, this was why he was in disbelief and became unwilling for Juliet to leave him and grow up.

    Therefore, overall, Shakespeare presents Lord Capulet as a good father to a certain extent.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pravi29)
    How far does Shakespeare present Lord Capulet as a good father?

    Throughtout Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare presents Lord Capulet as a good father to an extent through his actions.

    In Act 1 Scene 2, the audience has an impression that Lord Capulet is a considerate and caring father. Through the use of the agrarian metaphor 'too soon marred are those so early made', Shakespeare might be showing how Lord Capulet feels that he is marring Juliet's virginity and forcing her into motherhood. Also, he feels she is 'too ripe to be a bride' and 'has not yet seen the change of fourteen years'. In the Elizabethan era, girls were wedded as young as twelve, so Lord Capulet calling Juliet too young would surprise a Shakespearean audience. As if he was voicing the audience's astonishment, Paris says 'younger than she are happy mothers made'. Moreover, Lord Capulet's excuses to delay Juliet's marriage shows him as reluctant to marry her off due to the fact Juliet is 'the hopeful lady of his Earth' and his only child.

    As a father, his power over Juliet's marriage is shown with how he has many lines compared to Paris in a discussion about Juliet's marriage. Unconventionally, Lord Capulet continues to say that if Paris wills to marry Juliet, '[his] will lies in [her] consent'. Through the use of the rhyming couplets: 'within her scope of choice, lies my consent and fair according voice', Shakespeare links both Juliet and Lord Capulet's consent. Also, in a patriarchal society, this shows Juliet can only express her opinions through her father's 'fair and according voice' because as a woman she is powerless. Nevertheless, despite the patriarchal society, Lord Capulet breaks from the Elizabethan tradition of arranged marriage and gives Juliet a choice for her suitor, not alluding to the misogynistic views in the era that women were too weak to make decisions.

    Typically, a good father is one who provides his daughter with the basic necessities of life and a good standard of living. Through the nurse's remarks: '[Juliet] would have the chinks or in other words, she is wealthy, Shakespeare conveys that Old Capulet has provided her with good wealth and money. Therefore, in this way, he is a good father.

    In Act 3 Scene 4, Lady Capulet describes Juliet as 'mewed with the heaviness' by which she presumes from Tybalt's death. Suddenly, Capulet takes on a dictatorial position over Juliet declaring '[Juliet] will be ruled in all respects by me'. Feeling that Juliet will agree with him, he arranges her marriage. The audience may be shocked at how he is no longer the considerate father asking his daughter for her consent, however, Lord Capulet has good intentions and wishes to take his daughter's mind of her sorrow with marriage. Even more, in Act 1 Juliet says 'I'll look to like ... but no more deep will I endart my eye than your consent gives strength to fly'. Here, she says that she will agree to anything her parents consent to so it is no surprise that Lord Capulet did not bother asking his daughter. Nonetheless, as Paris was a relative of the prince, one could argue that by marrying Juliet to him, Lord Capulet felt he could escalate his status above the Montagues and this was just a selfish act for his social gain.

    Like most of the events in the play, he hastily arranges Juliet's marriage. Similar to how Romeo and Juliet's love, which Juliet felt was 'too sudden' and 'quick', is destined for tragedy, Lord Capulet's marriage arrangement does not end well either. Through the theme of haste, Shakespeare conveys the disorder within the play which contrasts with the fixed ordered nature of fate. Shocked at Juliet's disobedience and change in mind, Lord Capulet begins to verbally abuse Juliet calling her a 'wretch' and 'a green-sickness carrion'. By dehumanising Juliet, she is made inferior and powerless compared to Lord Capulet - the patriarch of the Capulets. Again, Capulet is given much more lines than the other characters and so the power of voice which shows what a powerful character he is. Ironically, Lord Capulet associates 'green sickness' - the sickness of virgins - with Juliet who the audience know has presumably just had consummation with Romeo. Through dramatic irony, Shakespeare shows how Juliet's parents are distant from her as well as not being as good parents as they think they are. Also, as green sickness was a sickness with a green tinge which prevented people from getting married, Cpaulet is saying that Juliet is unworthy of marraige and uses derogatory terms for her which portrays him as an abusive father.

    In the same scene, the dramatisation of Juliet kneeling down shows her lack of power within society in addition to how she is powerless as she belongs to her father. Juliet is no longer on a 'balcony' or 'aloft' but down; she has fallen. According to Aristotle idea of a tragedy, she is a tragic character and Shakespeare brings in the tragic element to this play. This stage direction also shows how Lord Capulet had become more dictatorial and how his attitude towards Juliet has changed. Though this may be because he is shocked at her disobedience and feels he should compel her in a bid to increase his own power and status, it may also be because he could not comprehend why Juliet had suddenly changed her views on her marriage and felt that perhaps her disobedience signalled her transition from childhood to adulthood as well as acting in that way because. Maybe, this was why he was in disbelief and became unwilling for Juliet to leave him and grow up.

    Therefore, overall, Shakespeare presents Lord Capulet as a good father to a certain extent.
    I think it's around a Grade 6, possibly a 7 if the marker was feeling nice.
    It has good analysis in some places, but there could be depth added through mentions of other interpretations.
    I say mostly a Grade 6 because it's a bit "clunky" in places.
    "Also", "Like most of the events in the play" and "Even more" are bits of vocabulary that you wouldn't see in a higher grade answer.
    Consistancy is key to getting the higher grades.
    Good use of quotes.
    Good effort overall
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kiki._.)
    I think it's around a Grade 6, possibly a 7 if the marker was feeling nice.
    It has good analysis in some places, but there could be depth added through mentions of other interpretations.
    I say mostly a Grade 6 because it's a bit "clunky" in places.
    "Also", "Like most of the events in the play" and "Even more" are bits of vocabulary that you wouldn't see in a higher grade answer.
    Consistancy is key to getting the higher grades.
    Good use of quotes.
    Good effort overall
    Thanks!
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: February 16, 2018
Poll
Do you like carrot cake?
Useful resources

Make your revision easier

OMAM

Ultimate Of Mice And Men Thread

Plot, context, character analysis and everything in between.

Notes

Revision Hub

All our revision materials in one place

Love books

Common grammar and vocabulary problems

Get your questions asked and answered

Useful literary websitesStudy help rules and posting guidelines

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.