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    So I got a third class honors degree in computer science and I havent had a proper job before so I'm wondering what to put when people ask me what salary I'm looking for?? What is the average for computer science graduates?
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    (Original post by cherlloydfan)
    So I got a third class honors degree in computer science and I havent had a proper job before so I'm wondering what to put when people ask me what salary I'm looking for?? What is the average for computer science graduates?
    Outside London in most places you're looking at anywhere between 21-26k normally for a grad role. So somewhere in there.
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    (Original post by cherlloydfan)
    So I got a third class honors degree in computer science and I havent had a proper job before so I'm wondering what to put when people ask me what salary I'm looking for?? What is the average for computer science graduates?
    First off there isnt really an average salary as it depends on what industry (and specific career/job role) you want to go into

    I will assume software development is what you want to go into though

    Honestly you got a third, you dont meet the criteria for most grad roles as they want a 2:1 (or in some cases 2:2) mainly.

    You should focus on

    1. getting that first software dev role, and do this by showing your software dev skills in the form of projects you have done (ie apps, websites etc etc)
    2. Once you have got that first job and are building up experience and refining your skills you can think about what salary you want as tbh you arent really open to the 'grad role' jobs due to your poor grade in your degree

    So I would throw out a number on the lower side of the average the other poster said due to this, the important thing is getting the work experience from the first so that they dont care about your degree and then you can start asking for higher salaries (if you are good at what you do)
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    with a third you'll be looking at low 20s, with a 2:1 Grad roles are high 20s.
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    (Original post by cherlloydfan)
    So I got a third class honors degree in computer science and I havent had a proper job before so I'm wondering what to put when people ask me what salary I'm looking for?? What is the average for computer science graduates?
    Depends on the type of company you're looking at and what role..

    There are CS grads on £15-18k doing dev work at SMEs up north and on £90k as FDEs at Palantir Technologies or SWEs at quant hedge funds. Then everything in between.

    You have to start actively applying and interviewing really to get a sense of the market.. Will be a struggle getting past CV screenings though with your current qualifications.

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    so what can I do to get a developer job then with my grade? the thing is i havent done much programming in ages and im no expert at it so how can i get into it more??
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    (Original post by cherlloydfan)
    so what can I do to get a developer job then with my grade? the thing is i havent done much programming in ages and im no expert at it so how can i get into it more??
    How good or bad would you rate your programming skills? Are you comfortable and competent with at least one high-level language (e.g. Java, Python)? Can you work with all the basic tools/keywords such as strings, lists, loops, classes, functions/methods, etc? Do you feel comfortable with the debugger for that language? How do you feel about OO programming concepts and OO design?

    You need to get all of the fundamentals nailed down before you go any further. If programming is a general weak point for you, then I would suggest you focus your time on getting the basics right before worrying about the rest. If you commit a reasonable amount of time to it (e.g. a few hours per day), then you'll be able to catch up in a couple of months. Depending on the language you're using, there will be tonnes of guides, tutorials, videos and online courses found easliy through Google (Java and Python in particular - the first page of results for either of these will give you plenty to get on with..).

    You don't need to be Jon Skeet, but it's not worth applying to a programming job until your programming skills up to a par where you can compete against other graduates who have a 2:1 or 1st classification. Make sure you don't fail the FizzBuzz test.

    Next, which modules did you study for your degree that caused you to struggle the most? Aside from programming fundamentals, look at your other "weak points" - the best graduates will probably have done well in other modules which focus on subjects such as Databases/SQL, algorithms & data structures, etc. Remember that you're competing with those top graduates for junior jobs, so you need to make sure you have all those same areas covered.

    The best graduates will have a great FYP to demonstrate to their future employer. What kind of project did you do for your final year? If it's a programming project, could you improve on it now in your own time, using it as both a demonstration showpiece as well as a target for improving your programming skills. You want something which you can be proud to demonstrate in an interview - make sure the code looks clean, well structured, commented, shows your technical skills, includes unit tests.

    Interviewers often like to ask questions about the FYP. A big part of programming is about decision making between different approaches to programming and design. Interviewers often probe the kinds of problems you faced and how you solved them. Wherever you might have made a choice (e.g. JSON-vs-XML or SQL Databases-vs-files), the toughest questions you'll likely be asked are "Why did you do this? Why didn't you do it a different way?" You need to be able to answer those kinds of questions without breaking a sweat - Be able to show you knew what you're doing and why you were doing it.

    Being able to answer questions about "why" during technical test often sets apart the best candiates from the worst ones. For example, how well could you answer some of the following questions?

    - Should getters/setters be used instead of public fields? Why or why not?
    - Is "goto" bad? What problems might occur if somebody has used "goto" for the flow control in their code instead of If, For, While or Switch/Case?
    - Are 'global variables' OK? Could you describe the likely problems with them and the circumstances when they might be "bad"?
    - When would you choose to use XML or JSON? What are the reasons for choosing one instead of the other?
    - What considerations would you have when choosing to store data in a text file versus a database?
    - Which deciding factors would make you choose to create class relationships using inheritance versus composition?
    - Is it a good idea to use short, one-letter names for variables and functions? What are your considerations when deciding on a variable or function name?

    Interviewers can come up with all kinds of things like this; a lot of seasoned programmers have an informed opinion on subjects like these. Being able to answer these kinds of questions objectively will demonstrate that you've actually seriously thought about your code on a deeper level than simply trying to get something to work by any means possible.

    Being able to talk about these issues demonstrates depth of technical understanding, and the ability to make informed decisions when faced with choices and trade-offs in your code. That's a pretty important part of software development, and it's something which you can only learn by writing code, thinking about it yourself, and reading about other peoples' experience with those trade-offs online. You'll find experienced programmers writing opinion blogs about stuff like this. You can usually find a lot of this sort of stuff on https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/ too.

    Try to keep this in mind as you're improving your programming skills - you will find nearly every problem has multiple possible correct solutions; most programmers can find a correct solution, but a correct solution isn't necessarily a good solution if it has serious drawbacks. The best graduates tend to understand that it's not enough just to learn how to write code using the syntax of a language, you really need critical thinking about everything you're doing when you're writing code as well.
 
 
 
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