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    Hi everyone! Good luck in the competition I'm sure I'm not the only one dreaming about the stationary

    The most useful tip I have is to get rid of all distractions, and to not give yourself excuses! I've been guilty of this in the past and for me it's the biggest thing to just totally kill your revision session. I like to put my phone in a different room when I'm studying, and if you're like me and like to listen to music when you study I just use an MP3 player so that I can't go on instagram. Another thing that helps is to break your study up into 45 minute sessions, with a 15 minute break once you've finished your "chunk" of revision. I've been doing this for a while now and it really does help, this week I even found myself putting off my break because I was so enthralled with finishing my Chemistry sheet! That's it for my top tips, hope this helped
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    My best tip for revision will be to do practice papers for each subject. I cannot stress the importance of this and highlight the fact that it truly helps with exam preparation.
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    Start by... starting!

    My biggest issue is procrastination, and I know I'm not alone with that. Sometimes you just gotta force yourself to start work.

    Once you start, make sure you don't push yourself too much. If you can't get through a paper after 1 week of revision, don't give up. Keep going, don't try a paper until you feel comfortable with the content.

    Be strict on yourself but give yourself times for breaks too.
    My revision timetables are based on priorities and this may help others who also have busy lives; I have 4 "priorities" and I will aim to complete 30 minutes - 1 hour of work per subject. There are 4 subjects each evening, priorities 1, 2, 3 and 4. Right now, I have to complete priority 1 subjects 6 days of the week, priority 4 subjects 3 days of the week and priority 3 - 4 subjects a total of 5 days per week for a total of 10-15 hours per week. Depending on how close to exams I am and what else is going on in my life, I can adjust the amount of time I spend on certain subjects while still getting a good amount of revision done! I did this at GCSE as well and it really helped me to not get bogged down when I missed days out of my revision schedule. Now I'm at A2.

    Finally plan your schedule day by day. Of course, have a rough idea of what you need to revise, but some days you have homework due and your Mum wants you to do something and you have a party that evening so to complete your revision schedule would be impossible! This helps with that. Also writing down how much revision you've actually done motivates you a lot if you haven't done that much.

    PS. if you mess up your revision schedule, that's okay too. DO NOT freak out about it because you'll just waste more time.

    Hope this helps someone<3
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    The first thing you need to do to start off your revision is, think about what you want to aim for in your custom amount of time (aim as high as you can unless you want to chill and do your minimum but my holidays are mostly surrounded by revision). So firstly, choose what you want to do and try and stick to it. Motivating yourself is the key thing so you'll need to also treat yourself to something after you do your amount of revision such as maybe going to The Waffle Project? (That's what I do - lol) Then you sort out how much you are going to do each day, what your going to do and prioritize the amount of time it's going to take unless of course, your one of those people who just can't stick to a time and does revision in about how much time they feel is needed.

    Maybe start splitting your time up, so do some revision for 30 minutes and then maybe play a game on your phone for 5 mins and then do 30 mins revision again and 5 mins doing something else.

    I hope this helps...

    xx
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    Okay so the best revision tip I have is that be productive 24/7. As in when you take a break make sure it isn't a nap - walk your dog,
    cook some food, clean your room, print out a calander and fill it out, you can check your phone but also do something where you are up and moving so that when it's time to work you won't be more inclined to laze around
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    Nothing I won't do for an attempt to get my hands on some stationary. :innocent:

    Happy half term everyone! Although not half term for me.. :emo: I really feel like I'm not the best at study tips because I fuel myself off past papers however besides past papers my favourite revision technique has got to be getting someone else to test me based on flash cards I've made (or notes for that matter). This is especially useful for remembering chunks of information and/or case studies to get key facts and definitions down. Then you can repeat this testing activity a few times a week to really drum the information into your head.

    Also I really like to get all my work done before I do other more fun things, this gives you a motive to revise as well as stopping you 'procrastinating' and just worrying about the work you're supposed to be doing, because that's no fun!
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    My best tip for revision:
    don't focus on the amount of time you spend revising; focus on what you do
    I do a topic/sub-topic and have a break. I usually do 2 short sessions of revision - in each revision session I do 1 topic.
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    (Original post by Fox Corner)
    Hi everyone :wavey:

    So, it's finally half-term. Phew! A bit of time to kick back and relax, away from school or college*

    *I'm sorry, anyone who is currently studying at university. A bit of a shock to the system to find out there are no half-terms there

    Here at Grow Your Grades HQ, we decided now would be a perfect time to have a little spot-prize competition, just so you don't get to forget about revision totally.

    We're offering not one, but TWO £25 amazon vouchers as a prize - imagine all the stationery, notepads and revision books you can buy with that! (You can also spend it on something fun, if you wish)

    All you have to do is share your best tip (or tips) for starting your revision. What things do you do to get prepared for exams? When do you start even thinking about it? What's the best thing you do that someone else might not have thought of?

    Just post your reply below, and we'll be doing a random draw of all the answers

    And have a great half-term! :woo:

    GYG




    - For starting my revision, I like to listen to motivational videos on Youtube (Channel: Motivation2Study)
    - To prepare for exams, I make either a Poster/PowerPoint on the content
    - I Then put all this information into Practice Questions, in which I answer on my whiteboard
    - I Then create a Poster/PowerPoint slide on the topics of questions i got wrong and look over those notes
    - I started thinking about the exams at the start of the year (and probably before)
    - The best thing I do is use a whiteboard. It allows me to write down my answers for my Practice Questions (without wasting paper)
    - It also allows me to write important equations + formulae in which I can look at every time I enter my room
    - It can also allow me to draw diagrams and pictures to help me with my revision
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    My favourite tip for starting revision is to write a to-do list and set yourself goals!
    You always need to be careful to not let yourself fall into a trap and use this to procrastinate but when used correctly, small goals followed by small rewards and having a clear idea of everything I need to do in a certain amount of time is really motivating, you have an incentive to revise and feel a sense of achievement after completing a task!
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    Revision Tips

    Motivation
    -Write yourself a note - what are you working for? Why does it matter to you? Why do you deserve it? I wrote mine carefully and pinned it as my background, on my walls, on my PC. Whenever I was about to procrastinate, I'd see it. Whenever I saw it, I forced myself to read it and it would fire me up to go and do some more work.
    -The 10 minute rule. Just do 10 minutes... ok? This helps you get started. Once the ball is rolling, it's so much easier.
    -Set yourself goals both by how much you achieve and by amount of time. Sometimes you just can't get all the notes done in a day, but if you've done 8 hours, that's good. Other times, 6 hours may not be enough and you should try to finish those notes. Reward yourself- if you get something done, then you're free henceforth.
    -Honestly, choose one ultimate goal. For GCSEs, it might be all 7-9s, for A levels it may be all As and A*s/meeting your offer etc. Just choose one and focus on how important it is to you to open them up on results day. Every time revision isn't working out, motivate yourself with that!
    -Sometimes revision doesn't go to plan, even for the best of us. The first thing to do is to acknowledge that you want to change it. After that, don't worry about it, or beat yourself up about it. By doing that, you're less likely to revise.

    Revision
    -Be flexible with revision schedules. I find that making one helps to get a plan on paper (making you feel organised and in control), but I've never in my life stuck to one. Making one does allow you to grasp what you need to get done.
    -Revise how you revise. I revise in big chunks - often 4 hours at a time. I hear people saying break regularly, but if that's not what works for you, don't do it. I find that I can't get back on track. However, don't stay lying down in bed for 4 hours. Have a glass of water (not really a break, but good for refreshing you), maybe pace while reciting/reading something.
    -Just turn all electronics off. if revising on computer, get rid of your Facebook tab and (dare i say it) your TSR tab etc.
    -Start revising from when you wake up. If you start well, you're more likely to end well. Plus, personally I find that my revision goes sorely downhill after 3pm.

    Breaks
    -Highly recommend: fresh air, exercise.
    -Avoid: online, youtube etc. Addictive!

    Other
    -SLEEP is so underrated. Get some. Don't revise during sleep time. Don't relax during sleep time. Sleep during sleep time.
    -Stay healthy. Drink regularly, eat well and healthily. Don't have alcohol/other naughty things during intense revision/near exams. Also avoid unhealthy food and junk food.
    -Talk to friends, stay in contact and have some off time. It works.

    Good luck, hope this helps!
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    My Revision Tips- A ReadySALTED Version

    The order that works best for me is:

    1. Making detailed revision notes- So what I try to do is instead of revising and memorising everything I try to UNDERSTAND and absorb the information, so I can apply this into any worded question. But mainly understanding the info allows me to make links between the information and create an image of how everything works.

    2. I would then create revision cards: These are great, especially on the go or when your waiting for the bus/your friend etc... I create two types. One is the Q&A cards and the other is breaking down the information from my detailed notes into concise bullet points which I may read when going sleep etc.. but also using the notes to reference too.

    3. Pastpapers: Literally my best friend. Revision should be based around the past paper questions, not only past papers- check the examiners report-- I find these particularly useful especially in essay questions to find out what the examiner was expecting to see and what trends the students tend to stick too.

    5. Youtube Videos: It amazes me what I tend to find. Sometimes I find tutors answering model questions on my past papers, further information relating to my spec or great points to add to essays to impress examiners.

    6. Predict: I start predicting possible questions weeks leading up to the exam. This is really useful, and sometimes has worked for me, especially as I prioritise on those topics. Although with that being said, never rely on this completely (just like you shouldn't put all your savings into Bitcoin- because if it crashes.. phufttt.) Also especially it's the last year for my spec, I'm looking forward to predicting some really good questions- especially those that haven't been used at all!

    Organise: make lists/plans for units: It works great in keeping me in focus on what I've got to do as well as motivated.
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    My best tip for starting revision is know your limit.
    We all know revising can be tough to start off, and the pressure to be one of those A* students who can revise hours and hours on end is so hard (seriously, mad respect for those who can). But we're not all hyper focused geniuses, and if you can only deal with revision in 10 minute time slots, then plan your revision that way. If you can go for 2 hours do it that way. I'm not a top achieving student (highest predicted grade at a level is B, lowest is D so I've got range) and there's so much pressure to be one and spend every waking moment revising, to the point where you feel like there's no point because its too much. But as long as you do the amount your happy with, and feel like on one day you can only do 20 minutes, then be proud and don't beat yourself up about it (i know easier said than done).

    TLDR: Do how much revision you can handle, and feel proud with any amount you do.
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    Happy Half-term guys!

    I think my best tip for starting (and carrying on with) revision is this: To process all the emotions and stress that's stopping you from starting in the first place.

    Worrying about the subject, thinking about how much you hate the teacher, not knowing where you're going with it or just disliking the way you have to revise.... you have to acknowledge all of that stuff before you start. Otherwise, you'll either a) not start at all or b) give up after 5 minutes and go on your phone.

    I am definitely guilty of not starting/not finishing revision simply because there's some stress I'm feeling about it. When I step back and realise 'hey, this is how I'm feeling' and 'this is why I'm feeling so stressed', I can actually knuckle down and get some good solid revision down. Remember that you procrastinate for a reason ... and then eliminate that reason out of your revision.

    :banana:
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    The first thing I do when revising is read through the notes before midmapping all I know. Then, I look back at the notes and add the points I missed onto the paper. After that, I do some online test on BBC Bitesize, Quizlet etc. before doing some sample questions to end with.

    Hope this helps anyone!
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    looks like this is the perfect time for me to plug my GYG as I’ve done lots of ‘how I revise’ posts recently! :lol:

    so as I’m in year 10, revision isn’t as regular as other people’s but I think it’s really important to create all your resources in advance. being prepared means there’ll be less stress and more time to truly revise to your hearts content later.

    I’m also still developing my revision techniques. for example, previously I would just write up lots of notes whereas now I’m starting to do more flashcards and mindmaps as I feel this is more effective.

    If there’s one thing I would absolutely have to recommend for revision though, it’s exam questions and practice papers
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    I think the best tips I could give for revising are:
    1. When making notes/mindmaps/flashcards etc from your class notes/revision guides, don't include information you don't need for the exams e.g. if a scientist was French and born in Paris on the 6th June 1902, you're not going to be asked for that information in an exam (unless of course it's history, in which case that information might be relevant) you're going to be asked about their contributions to science or to explain their method/theory etc- look at the specification (can always be found on the exam board's website- make sure you know the board, if you don't just ask your teacher) and see if there is anything you need to add afterwards
    2. Don't spend time rewriting information/doing questions on stuff you already know just because it's easy or because you enjoy that part of the course, e.g if I already know really well how to multiply fractions in maths, then I'm going to not spend lots of time practicing that, I'll work on histograms for example.
    3. Just because everyone you know uses a particular method or revises at a particular time or in a particular place, doesn't mean that you have to as well! Work out what kind of learner you are: visual, kinesthetic, auditory (there are 7 I believe) etc -there are LOADS of online tests you can do that only take a few minutes- and try some of the methods best suited to your style but equally if you're an auditory learner but prefer a typically visual technique for certain subjects, or just generally, then do that technique! GCSE language requires learning of answers to lots of questions and I like to learn mine by speaking them, others prefer writing them out lots of times, but for sciences I like writing information out lots of times and don't like speaking it because it just doesn't go in You do you!
    Personally, I love Quizlet for languages vocab (I do German and French and use it for both). You can input your words and using the 6 modes, you can get tested on them by translation both ways and for most languages, it can speak them so you can hear the correct pronounciation! (it's so great because my teachers sometimes don't have time in lessons to go through all the vocab so I can actually find out how to say it so I don't sound like an English nugget when I'm speaking the language ) Also (another free one!- always a good thing ) is languages online, I think this is better for grammar because it gives you fill the gaps, match ups, sentence writing etc to test things like verb conjugation- only thing is I think it is only for German, Spanish, French and Italian (ns about that one though). Also both Quizlet and languages online work on mobiles, Quizlet has a google play and app store app and languages online has a mobile mode.
    For sciences and humanities, I like to condense an entire subtopic onto one flash card- not full sentances, just key points, eg the points I'd need to include in a specification question to get full marks (at GCSE these are normally 4 marks, based on exam style questions so I make sure I have 4 good points that fully explain it)
    For RS and the Englishes (new word? IDK) if you need to learn lots of quotes, then cut up flashcard so each piece contains only quotes on the story of Moses for example and then on the reverse I write 'story of moses x2' if there are two quotes. I keep all the flashcards I have for each subject in separate bulldog clips (too many for paper clips!) so that if I want to revise biology I just grab those ones.

    4. I'm really bad at staying focused (some people are really good but not me!) and research suggests that you're more likely to remember what you've revised at the end and beginning of revision sessions, so take breaks! I use the pomodoro technique (using the tomato online timer). Essentially you work really hard without distractions for 20 minutes and then you get a 5 minute break to do whatever you like then after 4 repetitions, you get a 10 minute break and start again from the beginning. The only time I don't do this is when I'm essay writing- for this I just crack down and write!
    5. Have everything you could possibly need at your work station so you don't have to go off to get a glass of water and 'accidentally' get distracted (it happens, I should know , if you do need to go and get something, wait until the break- it can't be that urgent!
    6. I know everyone says this, but it's important, remove distractions! Chuck your phone to the other side of the room out of reach if you must! (I do)
    7. Have a rough revision time table, know that on Thursday you want to revise x,y,z but don't plan the exact timings as you're bound to spend more time than you allocated to revising the English Civil war, and less time than allocated revising upper course river formations. Not setting time limits gives you the freedom to spend as long as it takes to understand the quadratic formula, you won't feel rushed and when it runs over, your schedule won't be messed up which would only leave you demotivated. Oh and plan fun times with friends family etc, don't get bogged down with revision, let loose, eat that pizza, go to that party, just get back to revision afterwards.
    8. Finally and quite possibly most importantly, don't over stress, obviously some nerves about exams are normal but don't let it get to the point where you're crying because you think you'll fail but you haven't even sat the paper. Maybe the way you're doing it isn't working for you, maybe a different method would make more sense. In my maths class, some of us love to use the MathsWatch method for simultaneous equations whilst others hate it. If you're really stuck, ask your teacher, older sibling, parent, grandparent, next door's cat if they can explain it in a way that you get! Lots of people have lots of different ways to teach stuff, just because you didn't get it in class don't give up and decide that you'll never get it, adopt a growth mindset (yeah sorry maybe a bit cheesy but oh well it works! Promise!) and try another way! ASK FOR HELP ALWAYS!

    Hope this helps someone
    edit: I forgot to add past papers! My favourite method! It's hard for the new 9-1 GCSEs, but there are still the specimin papers, your mock and in class papers, and example questions online if you look. Do the paper/question then go through the mark scheme- what was right, what was wrong? And don't just focus on what you didn't get the marks for (though obviously focus on that too!), look at where you only got the mark because of the 'allow' section, next time your answer might not be in this section, so note the actual answer down and even if you got the actual answer but there were several options to get full marks e.g. a 1 mark question on why people didn't immediately accept Darwin's natural selection theory, if you put religion and you got the mark that's great but next time it might be a 2 mark question so you'd also need to write about insufficient evidence, in which case look at what else could have got you the question.

    That's all folks!
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    The best way to approach anything is to first understand it. I'd start off by going through my books and making short and concise notes which i can later revise from, rather than read directly from a 400 page textbook. For all the procrastinators out there as well, this helped me a lot in stopping to procrastinate is to do some calculations. E.g. If i can make 10 pages worth of notes in 1 hour and i do an hour of biology a day which comes from a book with 370 pages, I'll have finished my biology notes in 5 weeks. That still gives me time before the exam, but in addition to ALL your other subjects, you really don't have any time to waste if you're aiming for those top marks. Flash cards, mindmaps, condensed notes, revision guides, its all dependent on the person, but try to add some colour and flair to your notes to make it stand out and easier to remember! Also, it helps for certain subjects if you have notes stuck around the house, like for English. I have notes from Macbeth and Jekyll and Hyde stuck on my fridge, so whenever i stop by for a snack (extremely often), I just glance over the quote and it helps quite a bit. I almost forgot to mention this, but before you go out and buy all your stationary and what not, ORGANIZEEEEEE. My room before tidying it up was reminiscent of a bomb site, and was clearly not a place where proper studying would happen. So I cleaned up my room, created shelves for each subject and made everything neat and tidy and it has helped me IMMENSELY with my mental well-being. This might be because I'm OCD as well 😂😂😂. After all of your notes are done, go through every single past paper you can find. With some of the new courses there are limited past papers, but find other questions in your textbooks and online and try to do as much as possible. And finally, have fun. Try not to burn out and enjoy your last few months before sixth form and think of August when you're opening your envelopes and looking at your results.
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    (Original post by Fox Corner)
    Hi everyone :wavey:

    So, it's finally half-term. Phew! A bit of time to kick back and relax, away from school or college*

    *I'm sorry, anyone who is currently studying at university. A bit of a shock to the system to find out there are no half-terms there

    Here at Grow Your Grades HQ, we decided now would be a perfect time to have a little spot-prize competition, just so you don't get to forget about revision totally.

    We're offering not one, but TWO £25 amazon vouchers as a prize - imagine all the stationery, notepads and revision books you can buy with that! (You can also spend it on something fun, if you wish)

    All you have to do is share your best tip (or tips) for starting your revision. What things do you do to get prepared for exams? When do you start even thinking about it? What's the best thing you do that someone else might not have thought of?

    Just post your reply below, and we'll be doing a random draw of all the answers

    And have a great half-term! :woo:

    GYG




    1. Make a checklist. A nice one. I dont know about everyone else but for me, Checklists are so much to fun make (until you realise you actually have to complete ALL 27 tasks you wrote down) Write the deadline date and tick boxes super big so you feel pressured to complete the task. Plus it feels so good marking a nice juicy green tick on that checklist. Yum. Keep it in plain sight/somewhere you always go in your house to constantly remind you to do it. (I basically work better when I get guilt-tripped into doing the work, I hate seeing an empty checklist and I feel extra guilty throwing one away) So yeah, checklists are cool, go checklists!

    2.Get on top of your homework straight away so you can focus on revision and not stress about it later.

    3.Personally not a fan of timetables, so if you're like me, rank your subjects from your hardest to easiest, as well as the subjects you do the worst in/enjoy the most, from their rank your priorities. For me, I avoid History like a rash when it comes down to revsion. DONT do this. Try and do at least a one or two subjects a day, one that you love and one that you don't not so much. That way it'll feel like you're doing loads of work, had a bit of fun AND did a bit of the nitty gritty. Sometimes just chipping away at multiple subjects slowly is the best way to go.

    4. Sync up your phone to you laptop, if you have a Samsung (the superior phone....don't give into the capitalist, battery-sucking forbidden fruit laddos!) use OneNote (or a note taking app you can easily send a copy to on your laptop, if you don't have samsung) and whilst you're on your phone, sometimes maybe 'revise' by writing down things about an era that you need to learn, then do it! Sometimes I get home from college and find myself with a small list of English terminology to learn that I can't even remember myself assigning. Sometimes this is good as it forces you to work without it feeling like too much of a struggle.
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    it's feb half term guys...don't start stressing just yet!

    if you're in year 9 and under: please enjoy your time while it lasts. wait that makes it sound like you're gonna die (which is exactly what happens) but just make revision notes/mind maps/ flashcards for end of topic/year tests and DO NOT THROW THEM AWAY seriously your year 10 and 11 selves will thank you ever so much!

    year 10: if you've got mocks or 'internal exams' it's probably best to revise, although please please please do not think you have to wake up at 5am and revise about tundras for geography (and why would you even take geography in the first place...jk

    tips!

    1) use your exam timetable (if you've been given one) or just rank your subjects in order of how much 'work' you need to do (this will vary for everyone)
    start with the one that has most work. you'll be feeling most motivated on the first day, so you feel better about getting it done and you don't have to stress about it any more!

    2) do the work - i am guilty of doing this. i don't even know how i managed to spend four hours on youtube...eeeek. have no distractions! seriously, i let my mum hide my phone and i actually got work done it was amazing. obviously, if there is revision stuff on your phone, email it to yourself and then put that thing on airplane mode and shove it under your pillow!

    3) find out what works for you: are you a kinsthetic, auditory or visual learner? http://www.educationplanner.org/stud...les-quiz.shtml
    take the test to find out!

    4) much of the GCSE course is about memorizing content (although, they tried to make us think more about 'problem solving' now) so don't leave it all till last minute! literally, either first thing you do or last thing at night, ten minutes on quizlet is a life saver (especially for languages, think of all that vocab!)

    5) apps, youtube, online resources - we are a blessed generation z, so if you've got access to the internet, use it! there are loads of apps like bitesize which have pre-written flashcards on specific subjects that you can test yourself with, quizlet is a massive go-to for me as well. youtube has blown up, with 'study youtubers' who give amazing tips (literally just type 'gcse revision' and something is bound to come up) also TSR! ask a question, it's gonna be answered, or find a thread that'll help

    6) be concise - don't just copy out the text book. you're not gonna be able to remember that. make notes (they don't have to be pretty or aesthetic), then type them up so you have a digital copy, print those out, highlight key info, then bullet point those onto flashcards.

    7) don't compare yourself to others - she might be revising for 12 hours and come out with a 6, whereas you might be able to revise for 4 hours and come out with a 8? everyone is d i f f e r e n t!!!

    8) breaks - your brain can only function for periods of 40-50 minutes (which makes me question why the heck some exams are 2+ hours long) so take breaks but do not let them extend to the whole day (i had to learn this the hard way...)

    good luck with your studies, and remember, grades don't define who you are xx
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    (Original post by Fox Corner)
    Hi everyone :wavey:

    So, it's finally half-term. Phew! A bit of time to kick back and relax, away from school or college*

    *I'm sorry, anyone who is currently studying at university. A bit of a shock to the system to find out there are no half-terms there

    Here at Grow Your Grades HQ, we decided now would be a perfect time to have a little spot-prize competition, just so you don't get to forget about revision totally.

    We're offering not one, but TWO £25 amazon vouchers as a prize - imagine all the stationery, notepads and revision books you can buy with that! (You can also spend it on something fun, if you wish)

    All you have to do is share your best tip (or tips) for starting your revision. What things do you do to get prepared for exams? When do you start even thinking about it? What's the best thing you do that someone else might not have thought of?

    Just post your reply below, and we'll be doing a random draw of all the answers

    And have a great half-term! :woo:

    GYG




    My favourite tip for starting to revision is that before you make a list, or a big timetable, just do one task you need to do. Just one. Everyone gets stuck on making plans but if you have already started, it will be much easier to continue once you have planned!
 
 
 

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