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Jeremy Vine calls Black Panther cast "overwhelmingly black" watch

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    BBC The One Show presenter Jeremy Vine called the cast of Black Panther "overwhelmingly black" caused a back lash on social media.

    Many people were caught off guard by the comment as they suggested that Vine wouldn't have called Age of Ultron "overwhelmingly white".

    You can read the full story here.

    What do you make of this? Do you think this was inappropriate of Vine to say? Do you think it was maybe a blunder?
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    Non story.
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    A quick google search suggests the phrase 'overwhelmingly white' is frequently used, often with a negative connotation, and no one seems particularly bothered about that.
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    Whites hear this on a daily basis.

    Except ours is a lot worse. We're told our ancestral homeland is too White.
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    People on Twitter complaining about trivialities? What is the world coming to?
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    He was a bit crude and simplistic about it sure, but I don't think it's silly to highlight it. It's obviously notable that Black Panther has a predominantly black cast, as it's something that hasn't happened in a superhero film before. Pretty much every superhero film has been a mostly white cast. In fact, as far as I'm aware, the Blade trilogy are the only other superhero films in which the main lead is black, though I may have missed an obscure one.
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    ....and?
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    Blaxploitation movie described as "overwhelmingly black". The madness!
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    (Original post by anarchism101)
    He was a bit crude and simplistic about it sure, but I don't think it's silly to highlight it. It's obviously notable that Black Panther has a predominantly black cast, as it's something that hasn't happened in a superhero film before. Pretty much every superhero film has been a mostly white cast. In fact, as far as I'm aware, the Blade trilogy are the only other superhero films in which the main lead is black, though I may have missed an obscure one.
    Luke Cage was before Blade and this.
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    People are complaining because someone commented that it was remarkable for a superhero film to have a majority black cast even though that's a very note worthy thing and something the film actively shows off by having it set in a central african nation, plastered in african styles and culture? That's like complaining that the Supergirl tv series is overwhelmingly feminine.
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    So long as they aren’t changing the race of established characters it shouldn’t be an issue, for me anyway.

    With that being said there is a reason majority white films are made in white countries, target demographic brings in more revenue. Bit like casting a majority Chinese film in China or an Indian majority for Bollywood.

    This film is targeted at a minority group with an majority black cast, regardless of how people pretend they aren’t racist, they are. Most white parents will overlook taking there children for a family day out to this one. Just the way it is, maybe they should market it in Africa?

    Also pretty sure black casting doesn’t go over huge in the Asian markets, so that revenue will be nonexistent.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    Luke Cage was before Blade and this.
    As far as I know there's never been a Luke Cage film. If you mean the TV series, then it definitely wasn't before Blade.

    And sure, the Luke Cage TV series is part of the same genre, but still, it's not a feature film.
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    (Original post by anarchism101)
    As far as I know there's never been a Luke Cage film. If you mean the TV series, then it definitely wasn't before Blade.

    And sure, the Luke Cage TV series is part of the same genre, but still, it's not a feature film.
    Calm your tits.

    I was saying that in recent years there has been a move towards black superheroes which, in recent years, started with Luke Cage. Cage in the comics came about before Blade, but Panther is older than both. The weird thing is that it is not only the superheroes which are black but the entire format: the other characters, the cultural references. Egregious pandering to the black community, which is awkward because you know it's contrived.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    Calm your tits.

    I was saying that in recent years there has been a move towards black superheroes which, in recent years, started with Luke Cage. Cage in the comics came about before Blade, but Panther is older than both. The weird thing is that it is not only the superheroes which are black but the entire format: the other characters, the cultural references. Egregious pandering to the black community, which is awkward because you know it's contrived.
    I don't see why Black Panther's conscious largely African cultural context is fundamentally any different to Thor's largely Norse-Germanic one or Wonder Woman's largely Greco-Roman one. They're sci-fi/fantasy worlds inspired by particular real world cultures.

    Depends what you mean by "contrived". If you mean that productions like Luke Cage or Black Panther probably required more conscious attention to the cultural references and details than an equivalent "white" production, that's probably true. That's always going to be the case when whites are the dominant majority in the West and the "white" perspective tends to be assumed as the norm.
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    (Original post by anarchism101)
    I don't see why Black Panther's conscious largely African cultural context is fundamentally any different to Thor's largely Norse-Germanic one or Wonder Woman's largely Greco-Roman one. They're sci-fi/fantasy worlds inspired by particular real world cultures.

    Depends what you mean by "contrived". If you mean that productions like Luke Cage or Black Panther probably required more conscious attention to the cultural references and details than an equivalent "white" production, that's probably true. That's always going to be the case when whites are the dominant majority in the West and the "white" perspective tends to be assumed as the norm.
    Let's be clear; they're legends and not real-world cultures. The difference is that Thor and Wonder Woman are legends which by coincidence involve white figures. They were not chosen simply because of white faces.

    Luke Cage is set in real America, which is not abstract, and in fact there is a mix of white and black people there (even in Harlem). The cross-section of society Luke Cage exists in is not in reality all black; only abstractly all black. The creators went out of their way to defy logic and make it an all-black-environment for the sake of making it black.

    But note in the legend of Thor, which is supposedly all-white, Idris Elba made an appearance. Where is Panther/Cage's Idris Elba?

    Not that I even have a problem with focusing on a particular culture, though I don't appreciate division and I think by making a product solely for X cross-section of society that perpetuates division. My issue is that the product is black, it is meant to be black, and it is rather odd that it is all black since it purports to be in a real-world environment rather than in legend.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    Let's be clear; they're legends and not real-world cultures. The difference is that Thor and Wonder Woman are legends which by coincidence involve white figures. They were not chosen simply because of white faces.

    Luke Cage is set in real America, which is not abstract, and in fact there is a mix of white and black people there (even in Harlem). The cross-section of society Luke Cage exists in is not in reality all black; only abstractly all black. The creators went out of their way to defy logic and make it an all-black-environment for the sake of making it black.

    But note in the legend of Thor, which is supposedly all-white, Idris Elba made an appearance. Where is Panther/Cage's Idris Elba?

    Not that I even have a problem with focusing on a particular culture, though I don't appreciate division and I think by making a product solely for X cross-section of society that perpetuates division. My issue is that the product is black, it is meant to be black, and it is rather odd that it is all black since it purports to be in a real-world environment rather than in legend.
    It doesn't purport to be in a real-world environment, it is set around a country that kept its entire existence a secret. Everyone thinks its a bog standard central african country whereas its secretly the most technologically powerful nation on the MCUs earth that has a nationwide cloaking device that no outside aside from Serkis' character has ever seen (and now Cap and Winter Soldier). That's the equivalent of Egypt have the technology from Stargate and no one knowing.
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    Non story.

    He wasnt saying it as a criticism, just pointing it out as a breakthrough and a matter of fact.
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    (Original post by Gwilym101)
    It doesn't purport to be in a real-world environment, it is set around a country that kept its entire existence a secret. Everyone thinks its a bog standard central african country whereas its secretly the most technologically powerful nation on the MCUs earth that has a nationwide cloaking device that no outside aside from Serkis' character has ever seen (and now Cap and Winter Soldier). That's the equivalent of Egypt have the technology from Stargate and no one knowing.
    Rather unhelpfully, I admit, I went off on a tangent and wasn't talking about Black Panther.
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    (Original post by anarchism101)
    He was a bit crude and simplistic about it sure, but I don't think it's silly to highlight it. It's obviously notable that Black Panther has a predominantly black cast, as it's something that hasn't happened in a superhero film before. Pretty much every superhero film has been a mostly white cast. In fact, as far as I'm aware, the Blade trilogy are the only other superhero films in which the main lead is black, though I may have missed an obscure one.
    While not dc or marvel, there was a little superhero movie with Will Smith. You may have heard of it. It was called Hancock.
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    Why does it matter? It’s just an observation. We need to stop thinking everything has to be racist...
 
 
 
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