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Psychology grade has been haunting me... watch

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    So I've loved psychology and wanted to do something related to it at university.

    I know that I'm passionate about it but...

    ... I got a C at GCSE...

    I was expecting to get an A*.. I always got A*s in my mocks but on the day I turned out to have a C! The same happened for sociology where I only got a B! ... both of these exams were remarked but didn't come back with an improvement.

    The teacher tried to justify it by saying the grade boundaries changed by 13%(?) but to me that seems like I would've only got a B maybe...

    Now I'm doing both of these subjects at A-Level but I didn't do well at GCSE so what uni will want me?!
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    Universities don't care much about GCSEs, as long as you have Cs in English and Maths.
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    (Original post by 2-99)
    Universities don't care much about GCSEs, as long as you have Cs in English and Maths.
    Phew.. I got an 8 in English Language and 8 in English Literature which are good enough. I hope a 6 in maths is good enough too.

    I just thought a C at GCSE wouldn't show much dedication, interest or passion.
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    (Original post by Traore)
    Phew.. I got an 8 in English Language and 8 in English Literature which are good enough. I hope a 6 in maths is good enough too.

    I just thought a C at GCSE wouldn't show much dedication, interest or passion.
    You can prove your dedication, interest and passion in your A Level grade and your Personal Statement. Don't fret over it.
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    (Original post by 2-99)
    You can prove your dedication, interest and passion in your A Level grade and your Personal Statement. Don't fret over it.
    Thanks.. I'll work harder next year and hope for the best!
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    (Original post by Traore)
    Thanks.. I'll work harder next year and hope for the best!
    You're welcome. And good luck, kiddo!
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    I'm curious to know what GCSE Psychology was like, since I never took it a GCSE but took it as an A-level and am currently in my final year of my psychology degree.

    Do you have any idea what aspects you struggled with during the exam? It may have been the case that you just had a bad day and it unfortunately reflected badly on your grades. It may be that that course structure wasn't the best for you, in which case I would reflect on the differences between your GCSE and A-level courses and see where you might be able to improve.

    I'll say this though - my experience of Psychology at university is vastly different to that of A-level. So, don't be too disheartened if you didn't perform well this time around as you have the opportunity to improve.
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    (Original post by Claros)
    I'm curious to know what GCSE Psychology was like, since I never took it a GCSE but took it as an A-level and am currently in my final year of my psychology degree.

    Do you have any idea what aspects you struggled with during the exam? It may have been the case that you just had a bad day and it unfortunately reflected badly on your grades. It may be that that course structure wasn't the best for you, in which case I would reflect on the differences between your GCSE and A-level courses and see where you might be able to improve.

    I'll say this though - my experience of Psychology at university is vastly different to that of A-level. So, don't be too disheartened if you didn't perform well this time around as you have the opportunity to improve.
    I don't think I struggled in the exam.. everyone came out thinking it was easy and we all had time to spare, although I try not to waste any time. I was seriously expecting to get an A* which is why I'm so disheartened.

    What types of things do you learn at uni?
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    (Original post by Traore)
    I don't think I struggled in the exam.. everyone came out thinking it was easy and we all had time to spare, although I try not to waste any time. I was seriously expecting to get an A* which is why I'm so disheartened.

    What types of things do you learn at uni?

    I think 'struggled' might have been the wrong term. I was asking more along the lines of where did you fall short of what the marker was expecting? I know how you feel, I was expected to get an A* at A-level but unfortunately messed up on one of my exams, earning myself a B on that exam and pulling the grade down to an A. However, I was able to get feedback on where I fell short during that exam from my tutor. Is that something you're able to do?

    The difference in uni isn't just what we're taught but also how we're assessed. At my university we're taught some core modules (social, developmental, cognitive and neuropsychology) during our first year, and we gradually become more specialised. I was able to choose the majority of my modules this year, so I've opted for modules that focus on neuropsychology, mental disorder and psychopharmacology.

    We're assessed through a combination of coursework and exams, which again are much different to any A-level or GCSE exams. There's less of a focus on breadth of knowledge and more on depth of knowledge, and there isn't very specific marking criteria (e.g. you must have used these specific terms in order to get the mark). So you have a lot more opportunity to be creative in your assessments (within reason and as long as you back up your claims with evidence) rather than being confined to stringent marking and route learning. That's why it might be the case that the structure or assessment doesn't work as well for you at this level, but you might be suited to something at university. You're not 'bad' at a subject because you didn't do so well in an exam (especially if you had done well previously in mocks), you just might have had a bad day or just not benefited from how the course was assessed in the end.

    Sorry for this essay, hopefully this rambling is somewhat helpful to you.
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    (Original post by Claros)
    I think 'struggled' might have been the wrong term. I was asking more along the lines of where did you fall short of what the marker was expecting? I know how you feel, I was expected to get an A* at A-level but unfortunately messed up on one of my exams, earning myself a B on that exam and pulling the grade down to an A. However, I was able to get feedback on where I fell short during that exam from my tutor. Is that something you're able to do?

    The difference in uni isn't just what we're taught but also how we're assessed. At my university we're taught some core modules (social, developmental, cognitive and neuropsychology) during our first year, and we gradually become more specialised. I was able to choose the majority of my modules this year, so I've opted for modules that focus on neuropsychology, mental disorder and psychopharmacology.

    We're assessed through a combination of coursework and exams, which again are much different to any A-level or GCSE exams. There's less of a focus on breadth of knowledge and more on depth of knowledge, and there isn't very specific marking criteria (e.g. you must have used these specific terms in order to get the mark). So you have a lot more opportunity to be creative in your assessments (within reason and as long as you back up your claims with evidence) rather than being confined to stringent marking and route learning. That's why it might be the case that the structure or assessment doesn't work as well for you at this level, but you might be suited to something at university. You're not 'bad' at a subject because you didn't do so well in an exam (especially if you had done well previously in mocks), you just might have had a bad day or just not benefited from how the course was assessed in the end.

    Sorry for this essay, hopefully this rambling is somewhat helpful to you.
    To be honest, I don't know where I fell short. I thought my answers were good - maybe the mark scheme will be released soon and I can check it over (I can't remember what I put though!).

    Psychology at university seems highly biological which doesn't seem too enjoyable unfortunately.
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    (Original post by Traore)
    To be honest, I don't know where I fell short. I thought my answers were good - maybe the mark scheme will be released soon and I can check it over (I can't remember what I put though!).

    Psychology at university seems highly biological which doesn't seem too enjoyable unfortunately.
    Dw about it, A Level versions are a different kettle of fish; I got an A* in GCSE History for example, but got a B in A2 history. I had a friend who got a C in GCSE History, but an A in A2 History.

    So it varies, obviously your gcse grade correlates with what you'll get at A Level, but it's certainly not a definitive measure on whether you'll be successful.
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    (Original post by Traore)
    To be honest, I don't know where I fell short. I thought my answers were good - maybe the mark scheme will be released soon and I can check it over (I can't remember what I put though!).

    Psychology at university seems highly biological which doesn't seem too enjoyable unfortunately.
    You'll need at least some knowledge of biology for aspects of the course. However, I wouldn't call it 'highly biological' - it just happens that the modules I have chosen are more biologically inclined since that's what I'm better at. You'll learn about some brain anatomy, a bit on neural transmission, and that's it for the core stuff I would say. Probably not as daunting as you're imagining!

    Still, it's worth attending open days and asking about the course to see if it suits you. Good luck
 
 
 
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