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Engineering Jobs in America and VISA watch

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    Hi everyone, I've done some research and I kind of understand what is needed as far as VISA to get to work there. But my main doubt is about the likness to get an internship after graduation there.
    I'm studying for an Electronics and Computer Engineering Bachelor (Undergraduate) which is both electronics and IT. I have got an IT Diploma in Italy from High School. I am skilled in many ways: I know quite a lot of programming languages, I can easily adapt to ones and learn fast. I know about electronics and I developt stuff myself (digital electronics, microcontrollers and so on). I am currently on placement and I work with Intel (not on a contract with them). Many things basically.
    I consider my CV a strong one but I always ask my self: what do I have more than other students? Well probably a lot compared to the average one but what about students from top universities? So basically how easy would it be to get an internship or job after uni for someone like me in my field in America? (which is either electronics or IT or something mixed)

    Thanks everyone.
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    (Original post by LoKKeR)
    Hi everyone, I've done some research and I kind of understand what is needed as far as VISA to get to work there. But my main doubt is about the likness to get an internship after graduation there.
    I'm studying for an Electronics and Computer Engineering Bachelor (Undergraduate) which is both electronics and IT. I have got an IT Diploma in Italy from High School. I am skilled in many ways: I know quite a lot of programming languages, I can easily adapt to ones and learn fast. I know about electronics and I developt stuff myself (digital electronics, microcontrollers and so on). I am currently on placement and I work with Intel (not on a contract with them). Many things basically.
    I consider my CV a strong one but I always ask my self: what do I have more than other students? Well probably a lot compared to the average one but what about students from top universities? So basically how easy would it be to get an internship or job after uni for someone like me in my field in America? (which is either electronics or IT or something mixed)

    Thanks everyone.
    There isn't much more you can do apart from getting relevant work experience and getting good grades. Make sure you have a back up plan.
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    Thank you. Anyone with some experience about this?
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    I have no personal experience but I would be very surprised if it was not extremely difficult for someone without work authorisation to acquire one because relatively few visas are issued when you consider the number of people who would like to work in the US. Not having work authorisation really changes a lot when searching for work. IT work visas are dominated by large outsourcing firms doing intra-company transfers not Tech powerhouses hiring graduates. If you are really committed to this then you need to do much more research and try and get an idea of the odds of your success. Have a backup plan in any case.
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    (Original post by History98)
    I have no personal experience but I would be very surprised if it was not extremely difficult for someone without work authorisation to acquire one because relatively few visas are issued when you consider the number of people who would like to work in the US. Not having work authorisation really changes a lot when searching for work. IT work visas are dominated by large outsourcing firms doing intra-company transfers not Tech powerhouses hiring graduates. If you are really committed to this then you need to do much more research and try and get an idea of the odds of your success. Have a backup plan in any case.
    What I am thinking though is that I have quite good skills and experience so it should make employeers see me as more employable compared to other graduates. But yeah I do agree that probably there are more like me that want to go America. I'll try my best. My end goal is to live there and I'll try my best. I mean other people have done it so why I shouldn't be able since I'm already hard working.
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    (Original post by LoKKeR)
    What I am thinking though is that I have quite good skills and experience so it should make employeers see me as more employable compared to other graduates. But yeah I do agree that probably there are more like me that want to go America. I'll try my best. My end goal is to live there and I'll try my best. I mean other people have done it so why I shouldn't be able since I'm already hard working.
    I am not saying it's impossible, all I am saying it's bound to be difficult. If you understand that and are ready to put in the work then you will be better mentally prepared for the task that lies ahead. Even if you have loads of placements, loads of personal projects and you topped your engineering class, I suspect you will still not find it easy. Are you planning to study in the US and then apply after graduating over there or are you planning on applying from abroad?
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    I'm ok with working hard. I'm going to graduate in UK next year so I will be applying from here. I cannot afford to study in America and also don't want to study further since I can learn most stuff by my self so I don't value teaching too much in my case. I know that studying there can help but honestly it's crazy expensive.
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    Hi LoKKeR, So I've had a bit of experience with this and done a fair bit of research on it. In my final year of MEng Mechanical Engineering and spent the last year applying for jobs in the USA. No luck. Basically its difficult for a number of reasons: you will need an H1b visa, which requires a sponsor. Unless you have immediate family over there the only way you can get sponsored is via a company, this means the company has to offer you a job and be willing to pay the fees to sponsor you. Fine, if you're really good they'll do that. However, the visa isn't guaranteed after sponsorship, its done by a lottery with only a set number given out. This means companies aren't likely to take the risk of offering you a job that requires them to pay a fee for a visa that you only have a % chance of getting. Plus in my field (aerospace) they wanted US citizens due to security clearance. Its tough. I think you'd need to study there, have a solid job offer while studying and get lucky on the visa to have a chance. Either that or transfer within a company once you graduate, thats a lot less hassle. Good luck! And finger crossed Trump doesn't make it any harder for us.
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    Wanna get to America? Fly to Mexico, hop the border, "loose" your passport & have a kid. Done.

    Maybe harder with Trump, but still probably better odds.
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    (Original post by LoKKeR)
    I'm ok with working hard. I'm going to graduate in UK next year so I will be applying from here. I cannot afford to study in America and also don't want to study further since I can learn most stuff by my self so I don't value teaching too much in my case. I know that studying there can help but honestly it's crazy expensive.
    You should be aware that most grad students here are 'employer funded'. I did my masters at George Washington Uni, in Washington, D.C. Whilst i was going there (and working full time), my company had about 40 other people doing graduate work at GW. Depending upon the firm, they usually ask for a 4 or 5 yr commitment if they are going to fund you. Most companies have a bunch of people doing grad work in various areas. In general, they will be people who have Bachelors degrees (naturally), and have worked for a few years, before going back to grad school. At GW, about 1/3 of my classes were young people who had gone nearly straight through. The rest had worked for a few years, before re-starting. I got my Bachelors in 1969, and my masters in 1987, starting grad school in 1980. As i was travelling half the time - all over the US, it took me 7 years to finish - which may be a new record. Good luck!!
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    (Original post by Rabbit2)
    You should be aware that most grad students here are 'employer funded'. I did my masters at George Washington Uni, in Washington, D.C. Whilst i was going there (and working full time), my company had about 40 other people doing graduate work at GW. Depending upon the firm, they usually ask for a 4 or 5 yr commitment if they are going to fund you. Most companies have a bunch of people doing grad work in various areas. In general, they will be people who have Bachelors degrees (naturally), and have worked for a few years, before going back to grad school. At GW, about 1/3 of my classes were young people who had gone nearly straight through. The rest had worked for a few years, before re-starting. I got my Bachelors in 1969, and my masters in 1987, starting grad school in 1980. As i was travelling half the time - all over the US, it took me 7 years to finish - which may be a new record. Good luck!!
    Thank you for sharing your experience. Isn't it good that you can get a master later and it's funded by the company? This way you don't have to spend time in uni and can work and study too. It sounds great to me. What about grad students that wants to move from UK to America? Do you know anything?
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    (Original post by LoKKeR)
    Thank you for sharing your experience. Isn't it good that you can get a master later and it's funded by the company? This way you don't have to spend time in uni and can work and study too. It sounds great to me. What about grad students that wants to move from UK to America? Do you know anything?
    I think i would try approaching the uni, and ask what their experiences have been. I may be prejudiced, but why don't you try George Washington, Uni for starters (cough, cough!). I have talked to expat grad students there (whilst i was doing my masters), but don't recall the details. Of course, once you get a masters, you can teach, and work on your doctorate - and lots of people do that. Another option for employment might be to find a joint US/Uk project, and get on with either a US or Uk company working on it. You would have an advantage, in that you could live and work in the Uk or a commonwealth country. For electrical engineers, there might be openings in Alice Springs at the space research base there. You will have to pass the fairly stringent security vetting though. Good Luck!!
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    (Original post by Rabbit2)
    I think i would try approaching the uni, and ask what their experiences have been. I may be prejudiced, but why don't you try George Washington, Uni for starters (cough, cough!). I have talked to expat grad students there (whilst i was doing my masters), but don't recall the details. Of course, once you get a masters, you can teach, and work on your doctorate - and lots of people do that. Another option for employment might be to find a joint US/Uk project, and get on with either a US or Uk company working on it. You would have an advantage, in that you could live and work in the Uk or a commonwealth country. For electrical engineers, there might be openings in Alice Springs at the space research base there. You will have to pass the fairly stringent security vetting though. Good Luck!!
    Try (as an example): https://www.gwu.edu/graduate-admissions
 
 
 
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