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What is the most high-paying/demanding jobs in 2021-2025? watch

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    What would be the types of jobs that are very demanding and high paying in 2021-2025? I am looking to do a job in cybersecurity or IT. Would this be a good job to do?
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    in my opinion IT will be the least demanding, more overfilled even
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    (Original post by alvis2402)
    in my opinion IT will be the least demanding, more overfilled even
    That's highly unlikely given the huge sustained growth in IT over the past few decades, and how that growth has hugely outstripped the number of technically skilled people there are to fill those jobs. Even if the growth dropped off, there's such a massive shortage of people who have the right technical skills today.

    One of the reasons the problem is getting worse is partly because technology is evolving at such a pace that even a lot of people who might have had 'current' skills 10 years ago are falling behind, so there's a double-pronged problem of an insufficient number of skilled people entering the workforce, and an insufficient number of people in the workforce keeping their skills up-to-date.

    There's also another big problem in that education in the subjects has been lacking for a long time - There aren't enough skilled people entering the workforce partly because the system is too heavily focused on teaching IT as an academic subject (with a focus on passing exams, doing coursework, getting grades, etc.) rather than bringing those people up to the necessary standard to cope with technical jobs in the workplace. That makes it tougher for employers to fill the entry-level technical jobs, so even those are sometimes going unfilled.
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    But more stuff to do with IT is becoming common knowledge, to the less dense of people atleast.
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    (Original post by JoeyyS)
    But more stuff to do with IT is becoming common knowledge, to the less dense of people atleast.
    Remember that technology is moving on fairly quickly - so the kinds of things people were hired to do 10 years ago are less in-demand because newer ideas have emerged. Consider the number of up-and-coming fields which are steadily increasing in demand, and will probably be a "hot ticket" over the next 10 years - for example, AI, Big Data, Cloud Computing, Cybersecurity, Blockchain, etc. A lot of businesses want to take advantage of these things, but they're so far from being common knowledge right now; even among people who have been working in IT for a long time, there's insufficient availability of expertise on those subjects at the moment.

    The reality of working in IT is that older skills do lose their relevance after a while and new technologies slowly start to creep in, which is when demand for those older skills starts to flatten out - that doesn't mean the demand for IT professionals has flattened out, just that "IT" is a very broad, fast-moving area.

    If IT evolved at the same rate as other industries like Finance or Healthcare, then I'm sure there'd be a less of a problem because fewer people would be left behind. Until the rate of evolution in technology slows down, or our approach to teaching/training drastically improves, the demand for people with the right skills will always be high.
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    Thanks winterscoming for your post.
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    If you had no experience of studying IT, apart from at GCSE level, what would be the best way to learn the skills that will be in demand over the next 10 years?
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    Cyber security is particularly sort after, to the point where the government are opening up schemes (e.g. cyber first) to get people into it. There's lots of things to get into in that field: network setup, auditing, pen-testing, etc... So, have a look into those and see what floats your boat.
    General IT skills are expected now-days, but if you can code, or use database programs, or are competent at photoshop then you are in good shape.
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    Thanks for the advice. I will look into those areas you mentioned.
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    (Original post by Istanbul2005)
    If you had no experience of studying IT, apart from at GCSE level, what would be the best way to learn the skills that will be in demand over the next 10 years?
    What are you doing at the moment? Are you choosing your A-levels? Do you intend to go to university? There are several different career paths in IT, which can include programming-based careers such as Software engineering, but can also include other topics such as networking, security and infrastructure engineering. If you're not entirely sure which kind of technical career you'd enjoy most, then your best bet is to keep your options open instead of choosing a specialisation that you may not enjoy.

    If you have no experience in IT and are looking at A-level or degree choices, then don't worry about specific technologies which may or may not be in demand over the next 10 years because those are irrelevant to your job prospects right now (and before you start learning those you should take the time to learn more about different IT career paths to see which would be the best fit for you).

    Otherwise, your goal should be to focus on courses which will help you pick up the fundamentals of problem solving and learning core technical skills in areas which you'd typically expect to find on a typical computing course such as programming, networking, databases, web development, mathematics/logic, computer architecture, etc.

    If you're currently looking at A-level choices with a view to eventually reaching university, then focus on giving yourself the best chances at getting into a good university - that should ideally include A-Level mathematics, and possibly Further Maths; you could also choose a Computing A-Level or maybe another Science such as Physics - obviously your A-Level grades will determine your university choices, so make sure you choose subjects where you have the best chance of scoring A/A*

    If you're not looking at university, then depending whether you've got a specific area of interest, consider a vocational computing course (depending what you can apply for with your GCSE grades) or even an apprenticeship. There are plenty of ways to get into a computing career without university or A-levels, but at this stage, you need to focus on general skills rather than specific technologies - you could look at BTEC/HNC/HND computing courses, and you could include online courses in this from sites like Udacity or edX.

    There are also options such as certification from companies like Microsoft, Cisco and Oracle for specific technologies - again, it rather depends what you'd like to do, but Cisco certification is extremely valuable if you'd like a career related to networking or security. Microsoft Certification covers a wide range of topics and is generally valuable. Oracle have some very valuable database-related and java-related certification. Certification like this is good if you've decided on a particular IT specialisation.

    Having knowledge of specific technologies is not an issue for anybody at the beginning of their career - people hiring junior engineers expect a solid grounding in the fundamentals, but don't really care whether you know anything about Cloud/Blockchain/etc. Problem solving is key to being considered for these types of jobs, and being able to demonstrate that you are competent in programming, databases and other core subjects, and just as importantly being able to show a lot of enthusiasm for the subject.
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    Winterscoming - Thanks for your reply and all of those suggestions. I am currently in full-time employment and would like to change career.

    I am really unsure what I would like to do, so I'm researching different career sectors to see what I think I would like best.
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    The most obvious one is Data Scientist

    They are in very short supply, get paid the highest in the technology sector and demand is only going to grow. You need to be highly skilled though. Jobs like these aren't for people who are only in it for the money.
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    (Original post by AaronSR)
    What would be the types of jobs that are very demanding and high paying in 2021-2025? I am looking to do a job in cybersecurity or IT. Would this be a good job to do?
    Funeral services, if there's one thing you can count on, it's that people will keep dieing, and the world's population is expanding, so I would expect business to be good
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    (Original post by AaronSR)
    What would be the types of jobs that are very demanding and high paying in 2021-2025? I am looking to do a job in cybersecurity or IT. Would this be a good job to do?
    well don' know about 2021-2025 but these jobs will be in demand in coming years.

    10. SEO/SEM Marketing:
    Search engine optimization and Search engine marketing are in high demand with the rise of online businesses and web marketing. This happens to be, one of the best way to promote a business and reach out to a wider audience by overcoming geographical barriers. Most people are expected to learn the skills. Google provides a free guide for starters to understand and implement SEO effectively in businesses.

    9. Java knowledge:
    If you can develop Java code, then you are in great demand. Java developers are needed for coding in games, applications, and software and computer programs. They often hold a degree in Computer Sciences or Technical field. They earn approximately $72,000 annually. Most freelancers are familiar with coding and earn really good.

    To know more : Top Skills With High Demands In The Future
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    IT skills are very likely to remain as one of the premier sought after skills whether it be in networking or security.

    Tbh it's up to you. I wouldn't advise you to look at those particular skills but more to see what and where your passion lies in within computer science. If you like algorithms and data structures you're in good stead. If you like data analytics again ML/AI is only getting bigger and bigger but be careful not to pigeonhole yourself in just one specialism. Ofc master it as much as possible but it's also important to be versatile and a quick learner cos technologies can become obsolete very quickly.
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    Corrupt politicians because by those years many totalitarian regimes will be in power. Mark my words.
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    Most jobs in the finance sector will make you wealthy. Study economics at LSE and your chances of earning 6 figures is increased a lot.
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    (Original post by AaronSR)
    What would be the types of jobs that are very demanding and high paying in 2021-2025? I am looking to do a job in cybersecurity or IT. Would this be a good job to do?
    Cyber-security is fantastic. That will do your life the best. With advance of technology, means an advance in the potential of hackers and so cyber-security specialist are always needed to protect businesses from overseas hackers and much more.

    Jobs in health such as doctors, surgeons, and nurses will always be needed. Especially nurses because of the ageing baby boomers and Gen X, they need people to look after them.

    Software , chemical and electrical engineers are fantastic jobs as well.

    The trades (Plumbers, Electricians, Automotive mechanics) are great jobs as well because society will always need them. They do form the backbone of society. They are very hard to outsource to other countries making the job security for them very stable.
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    (Original post by winterscoming)
    Remember that technology is moving on fairly quickly - so the kinds of things people were hired to do 10 years ago are less in-demand because newer ideas have emerged. Consider the number of up-and-coming fields which are steadily increasing in demand, and will probably be a "hot ticket" over the next 10 years - for example, AI, Big Data, Cloud Computing, Cybersecurity, Blockchain, etc. A lot of businesses want to take advantage of these things, but they're so far from being common knowledge right now; even among people who have been working in IT for a long time, there's insufficient availability of expertise on those subjects at the moment.

    The reality of working in IT is that older skills do lose their relevance after a while and new technologies slowly start to creep in, which is when demand for those older skills starts to flatten out - that doesn't mean the demand for IT professionals has flattened out, just that "IT" is a very broad, fast-moving area.

    If IT evolved at the same rate as other industries like Finance or Healthcare, then I'm sure there'd be a less of a problem because fewer people would be left behind. Until the rate of evolution in technology slows down, or our approach to teaching/training drastically improves, the demand for people with the right skills will always be high.
    Would +1 if hadn't already. What you've said is true about the demand in new tech. Already I'm to bring on board a team of devs to lead and work alongside seniors. Node.js and surrounding tools are quite hot right now in terms of their capabilities when integrated with other technologies. Blockchain is something we'll look at later on, but AI and similar is our main focus in the financial sector right now. Skillset is very low indeed; half the CVs I come across can't even spell! And the ones that make it to the next stage, again, you can tell a lot are blagging it away. We've had to get cheap talent from developing countries.
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    (Original post by Hidan)
    Cyber-security is fantastic. That will do your life the best. With advance of technology, means an advance in the potential of hackers and so cyber-security specialist are always needed to protect businesses from overseas hackers and much more.

    Jobs in health such as doctors, surgeons, and nurses will always be needed. Especially nurses because of the ageing baby boomers and Gen X, they need people to look after them.

    Software , chemical and electrical engineers are fantastic jobs as well.

    The trades (Plumbers, Electricians, Automotive mechanics) are great jobs as well because society will always need them. They do form the backbone of society. They are very hard to outsource to other countries making the job security for them very stable.
    Thank you for the reply.
    (Original post by Hidan)
    Cyber-security is fantastic. That will do your life the best. With advance of technology, means an advance in the potential of hackers and so cyber-security specialist are always needed to protect businesses from overseas hackers and much more.

    Jobs in health such as doctors, surgeons, and nurses will always be needed. Especially nurses because of the ageing baby boomers and Gen X, they need people to look after them.

    Software , chemical and electrical engineers are fantastic jobs as well.

    The trades (Plumbers, Electricians, Automotive mechanics) are great jobs as well because society will always need them. They do form the backbone of society. They are very hard to outsource to other countries making the job security for them very stable.
 
 
 
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