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As a rule of thumb, what grades do I need to enjoy my life later on? watch

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    I know this is controversial and extreme but if you had to base the future entirely on GCSE grades atm, what grades would u say are needed to get a good job(around 60k a year)? Yes I know that it depends on A levels and uni but that's not my question.
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    It's not the answer you're perhaps looking for but GCSEs really have limited bearing on what you'll earn. Pass the important ones and you'll be fine. It's best to just strive to get the highest grades you as an individual are capable of getting
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    all grade 9's. anything else you'll be homeless
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    (Original post by xhyper22)
    I know this is controversial and extreme but if you had to base the future entirely on GCSE grades atm, what grades would u say are needed to get a good job(around 60k a year)? Yes I know that it depends on A levels and uni but that's not my question.
    If you know that it depends on A Levels and your Degree then why are you asking? Additionally, it is not even based on A Levels and your Degree.

    Employers don't pay you for the educational grade you got. They pay you based on the value you can bring to the company. Nobody will pay you 60K just because you got a dozen A* at GCSE. They'll pay you 60K because the skills you have mean your work has at least a value of 60K.

    You don't need good grades to get a high paying job. You need useful skills. In some cases, getting a good grade in a subject means you have those skills, in other cases those skills come from elsewhere outside education.

    Employers won't pay you for getting a GCSE in the same way they won't pay you for getting a 1st at degree level. They pay you for what those grades represent in terms of your skills combined with all the other things outside education. I wouldn't say it's controversial or extreme, it just shows that you don't understand how your grades actually translate into usable job skills. It's an impossible to answer hypothetical question because it's so incredibly far from how the world works.
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    Just try not to get anything lower than Cs in anything, aim to average at A/B so like mostly 6/7s. Obviously if you can try and get a few 9s/8s but its not the end of the world.
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    (Original post by xhyper22)
    I know this is controversial and extreme but if you had to base the future entirely on GCSE grades atm, what grades would u say are needed to get a good job(around 60k a year)? Yes I know that it depends on A levels and uni but that's not my question.
    Hi there,

    I think this a really good question as knowing how GCSE relates to future success isn't something that is always fully explained.

    Employers will always look for a good level of Maths and English at GCSE. If you can achieve a grade 4/5 you should be okay.

    If you are looking to progress onto A-levels focus on the core subjects the school ask you to do and aim for at least five grades 9-5 (some may accept 4).

    You can sometimes negotiate your salary depending on experience, but generally speaking how much you earn depends on the career you've chosen to go into.

    If you've got some career ideas in mind and you want to know what the average salaries are you might find out Job Profiles a good starting point -

    https://nationalcareersservice.direc...-profiles/home

    I hope this helps.

    Sophie - National Careers Service
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    If you know that it depends on A Levels and your Degree then why are you asking? Additionally, it is not even based on A Levels and your Degree.

    Employers don't pay you for the educational grade you got. They pay you based on the value you can bring to the company. Nobody will pay you 60K just because you got a dozen A* at GCSE. They'll pay you 60K because the skills you have mean your work has at least a value of 60K.

    You don't need good grades to get a high paying job. You need useful skills. In some cases, getting a good grade in a subject means you have those skills, in other cases those skills come from elsewhere outside education.

    Employers won't pay you for getting a GCSE in the same way they won't pay you for getting a 1st at degree level. They pay you for what those grades represent in terms of your skills combined with all the other things outside education. I wouldn't say it's controversial or extreme, it just shows that you don't understand how your grades actually translate into usable job skills. It's an impossible to answer hypothetical question because it's so incredibly far from how the world works.
    Really? I probably know nowhere near the amount u do but my school tells us that unless u get 9s, 8s and 7s( grammar school btw so probably explains it), employers will bin your CV.
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    No specific grades will guarantee you success in life. Aim for the best you can get though.
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    Interesting question.

    First of all, let's throw away the bit about earning more or less than 60k. That's an entirely arbitrary figure that won't have the value you think it has right now in ten years' time, or if you live in Central London.

    Secondly, what sector are you thinking of going into? For some sectors, the benefits you get by going to a certain class of (usually selective) universities are far greater than others. By 'benefits', I don't necessarily mean 'university prestige'. I mean employer presentations, networking, competitions, positions of responsibility, opportunities for postgrad funding, and a general pressure to go for certain types of high-paid jobs.

    (Original post by xhyper22)
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    (Original post by xhyper22)
    Really? I probably know nowhere near the amount u do but my school tells us that unless u get 9s, 8s and 7s( grammar school btw so probably explains it), employers will bin your CV.
    School tells you that because it's in your school's interest to get high grades, because they are judged on those grades as a school.
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    (Original post by xhyper22)
    Really? I probably know nowhere near the amount u do but my school tells us that unless u get 9s, 8s and 7s( grammar school btw so probably explains it), employers will bin your CV.
    I would think that very few employers really have much of an idea about how the new GCSE grading system works...

    A rule of thumb is that your GCSEs/equivalent have to be good enough to get you onto the next stage of your education or into a job. Aim for the best you can, though.
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    (Original post by 04MR17)
    School tells you that because it's in your school's interest to get high grades, because they are judged on those grades as a school.
    Right that will be it lol. It's funny how they said it so seriously though.
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    (Original post by xhyper22)
    Right that will be it lol. It's funny how they said it so seriously though.
    It's alarming because it stressed everybody out. They say it because a.) they're stressed. and b.) there are always pupils who don't put effort in, and this is an attempt to shock them into revision. It also terrifies pupils who do work hard but get stressy. Winds me up no end.:grumble:
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    (Original post by Smack)
    I would think that very few employers really have much of an idea about how the new GCSE grading system works...

    A rule of thumb is that your GCSEs/equivalent have to be good enough to get you onto the next stage of your education or into a job. Aim for the best you can, though.
    To remain in 6th form, I just need 4 7s but employers still tend to look at your GCSEs due to no more AS level. If they see GCSEs more, they might reject someone who gets 8s(which are good grades) as opposed to the one who gets 9s. A levels would obviously be looked at but in this scenario lets say they have similar A levels. Correct me if I'm wrong(almost all the time).
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    GCSE means bugger all. Its about what you can bring to a company's table. Be it welding, bookkeeping skills or programming or whatever. Its all about work experience. You'll find a few graduates who went to top unis with AAA grades yet they struggle to get a job.
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    I'm a mature student, well into adulthood. Depending on what you want to do, the two MUST grades are AT LEAST a C in both Maths and English language (sorry literature wont count). That is it. Most employees expect those two as a given.

    Now if you are heading into a specific career then maybe a science or the like would be added. This of course doesn't cover college/university entry and you would need to check the specific course and place.

    For a £60K job you would probably need a Honnors Degree, with years of experience to back it up, it definitely isn't a starting wage -the average working amount is £24K. Nor is it a wage you would attain in your early career, but something on average you would get in your 50s etc., and only when you were at the top of your chosen career, a bit like Olympian. £60K is pretty unreachable for most, where as something like £35k would be realistic for a life career. It entirely depends on the degrees you have and job experience as well as the career you choose.

    I would recommend getting the highest feasible grade you can in each of priority career driven subjects, don't worry to much about the others EXCEPT English Language and Maths.

    We have roughly 13 weeks to go to the exams, so plenty time of time to get head down, start revising now, do extreme prep and you've got better chances of getting the grades you want


    PS one thing that will make a difference is the University you go to - so if you get a chance to go to Oxford/Harvard or in the top 5 then go there.
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    (Original post by xhyper22)
    Really? I probably know nowhere near the amount u do but my school tells us that unless u get 9s, 8s and 7s( grammar school btw so probably explains it), employers will bin your CV.
    Your school is either blatantly lying to you or has no idea what the real world is like. Or both. An employer that bins your CV because you didn't get a certain grade at GCSE is not worth working for. If an employer is placing so much emphasis on GCSE grades that they would bin your CV for not having good grades then they're not really valuing you as an employee.

    Keep in mind that by the time you start applying for real jobs, you'll have spent 2 years at college and 3 years at uni (if you go that route). That means your GCSEs are not only 5+ years out of date but they're also outclassed by your degree, which holds far more weight that your GCSEs. Not to mention you're really still a child when taking GCSEs.

    Schools want you to think that your GCSEs are the most important thing in the world. To an extent they're not wrong and in many cases your GCSEs decide whether you get to go to college. They also contain a lot of foundational life knowledge. However the grades themselves stop being relevant the moment you get into college from my experience. Your university choice might care about them and the odd job might ask for them but you'll find that once you get into college, nobody asks about your GCSEs ever again.

    Don't blindly believe what your school tells you. Make decisions for yourself. Try your hardest to get good grades because high grades will always open more doors for you. But don't think that you need straight 9s to ever get a high paying job.

    To look at it another way, not everyone is an employee. Think about all the self employed people or all the successful entrepreneurs. They have no bosses to ask them what GCSEs they got. There's nobody to fire them if they didn't get top GCSEs.

    GCSEs are not the path to money. Good GCSEs mean you are probably strong academically, meaning you'll probably get good A Levels, get into a good uni and come out with a good degree. That all opens doors. But it's because you are good academically that these things happen, not because you got high GCSEs. And this is not the only way to go things.

    No worthwhile employer will bin your CV if you don't have high GCSEs on it. And quite frankly, if you're a worthwhile applicant, you'll struggle to even find space to write your GCSEs on there in the first place. I recently had to cut my GCSEs from my CV because I had more important things to write about. My GCSEs take up a single line of my CV, simply listing the grades I got. I don't expect anyone to read it and it'll be one of the first things to go when I get my next job.
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    (Original post by xhyper22)
    To remain in 6th form, I just need 4 7s but employers still tend to look at your GCSEs due to no more AS level. If they see GCSEs more, they might reject someone who gets 8s(which are good grades) as opposed to the one who gets 9s.
    What sort of employers are we talking about here though? Because the only employers that need to take GCSEs into account due to no AS grades are the little part time jobs you get at college. By the time you are looking for real jobs, you'll have A Levels and a Degree.

    As for the little part time jobs, it's stuff like working retail for example. They are not going to care about getting a 9 vs an 8 because it's not in any way representative of whether you'd be a good worker.

    "Real" employers and high paying jobs will look at your Degree and your experience. If you are looking to get a job and don't have a Degree or A Levels yet then the jobs you can apply to are going to be limited. The limited options available are going to care more about your skills and personality as a fit for the role than they will about your GCSE grades. Obviously good GCSEs are nice to have and will help but top GCSEs are certainly not a necessity. These jobs aren't really that competitive.

    And by the time you get to a level where the jobs are competitive, you'll have a Degree and hopefully a bunch of useful skills to show off. Your GCSEs are one of the last things a competitive employer might compare and it's incredibly unlikely that they'll get 2 identical candidates where that becomes necessary.

    There's almost always something more important to compare over the 9 vs 8 at GCSE.
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    (Original post by xhyper22)
    To remain in 6th form, I just need 4 7s but employers still tend to look at your GCSEs due to no more AS level. If they see GCSEs more, they might reject someone who gets 8s(which are good grades) as opposed to the one who gets 9s. A levels would obviously be looked at but in this scenario lets say they have similar A levels. Correct me if I'm wrong(almost all the time).
    What kind of jobs are you considering? As Acsel says, very few are interested in GCSEs. This is often either because a) said jobs are not reliant on academic ability, for example typical part-time work in retail or something that someone in education might be doing to earn a bit of money to keep them afloat, or b) because GCSEs have been superseded by a degree or A-levels.

    Hence, there is no rule of thumb other than that they must be good enough to get you to the next stage in your education or career journey, such as A-levels, apprenticeship, on the job training etc.
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    (Original post by xhyper22)
    I know this is controversial and extreme but if you had to base the future entirely on GCSE grades atm, what grades would u say are needed to get a good job(around 60k a year)? Yes I know that it depends on A levels and uni but that's not my question.
    No one really cares about your GCSEs but try not to get many Cs or below. Getting good A-level grades in facilitating subjects and applying to good universities is paramount however.

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