xoxrazanxox
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Which is more important: Nature or nurture?
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soIiIoquy
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they're both important, you can't say one is better than the other
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chazwomaq
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Important for what?
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xoxrazanxox
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(Original post by chazwomaq)
Important for what?
Just the nature-nurture debate in general. Your views and opinions etc.
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chazwomaq
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The question is too broad to get a meaningful answer. But this article is a great starting point:

Turkheimer, E. (2000). Three laws of behavior genetics and what they mean. Current directions in psychological science, 9(5), 160-164.

TLDR:

First Law: All human behavioural traits are heritable.
Second Law: The effect of being raised in the same family is smaller than the effect of the genes.
Third Law: A substantial portion of the variation in complex human behavioural traits is not accounted for by the effects of genes or families
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xoxrazanxox
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(Original post by chazwomaq)
The question is too broad to get a meaningful answer. But this article is a great starting point:

Turkheimer, E. (2000). Three laws of behavior genetics and what they mean. Current directions in psychological science, 9(5), 160-164.

TLDR:

First Law: All human behavioural traits are heritable.
Second Law: The effect of being raised in the same family is smaller than the effect of the genes.
Third Law: A substantial portion of the variation in complex human behavioural traits is not accounted for by the effects of genes or families
Thank you, this is in fact a great starting point!
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Noodlzzz
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I like the analogy of the rectangle to explain what contributes more out of nature and nurture - does height or width contribute more to a rectangle?
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chazwomaq
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(Original post by Noodlzzz)
I like the analogy of the rectangle to explain what contributes more out of nature and nurture - does height or width contribute more to a rectangle?
This is not a great analogy at all. There is a very precise mathematical relationship (proportional) between height and width. This relationship applies to individual rectangles and will always be true by definition.

THere is no such relationship with "nature/nurture". Instead we have to use estimates of heritability and environmental influences. These are population - not individual measures. And it is possible to have traits which are heavily influenced more by one than the other.

Moreover, nature and nurture interact i.e. there is no necessary linear or proportional relationship between the two. Every gene is expressed in an environment. If we change the environment, we may change the way the gene expression works. This includes unknown environments of the future.
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