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    1. What is the importance of guilty consciences in the play? What is the context?

    2. What is the significance of Gerald in the play?
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    You just brought back terrible memories.

    School was so **** 😂
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    I honestly cannot wait to get it over and done with!!
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    (Original post by ellreeves1)
    I honestly cannot wait to get it over and done with!!
    I was **** at school but I think the best way is just to Read the question and don’t think into it too much. I can’t remember what happens even though I’m pretty sure I read the book and saw the play but..

    Question 1: who has a guilty conscience during the play and how does it affect the story

    Question 2: who is Gerald? How does he affect the story?. How does he affect other characters?
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    (Original post by ellreeves1)
    1. What is the importance of guilty consciences in the play? What is the context?

    2. What is the significance of Gerald in the play?

    Please help me
    It has been a long time, I loved this play! I can't really remember everything in the play so I'll try my best. (I don't know how to answer q1 much, I think q2 is much better). Hope this helps!

    1. Guilty conscience
    Shelia and Eric, the younger generation seem to have it
    They have both learnt their lesson
    The others will have to learn it in "Fire, blood and anguish"
    Had they had a guilty conscience at the time of their encounter with Eva maybe these things wouldn't have happened.
    Mr Birling says "Look Inspector, I'd give thousands" yet he couldn't give a few shillings to his workers.

    2. Significance of Gerald
    Bridges the gap between the older generation and the new generation
    It seems as though he is of similar age to Sheila as they are engaged, but the way he thinks/acts is similar to Mr and Mrs Birling, trying to dismiss the whole thing after the Inspector leaves
    Gerald represents the upper class society and Mr Birling is constantly trying to impress him. When Mr Birling says "I had to dismiss her"(something like that I can't remember) Gerald says that's what my father would have done. This shows that the upper class of society want to cover their own back, make sure that they look good in society and impress other. They do not care about their worker and their conditions (I think Eva wanted half a shilling more or something I can't remember).
    You could say that Gerald was the only one who actually cared for Eva and kept her happy, at least for some time. He gave her a place to stay, gave her food, saved her in the pub from Old Maggarty (I can't remember his name). The others didn't like her, used their power against her and completely emotionally destroyed her.
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    (Original post by AthenaSphinx)
    It has been a long time, I loved this play! I can't really remember everything in the play so I'll try my best. (I don't know how to answer q1 much, I think q2 is much better). Hope this helps!

    1. Guilty conscience
    Shelia and Eric, the younger generation seem to have it
    They have both learnt their lesson
    The others will have to learn it in "Fire, blood and anguish"
    Had they had a guilty conscience at the time of their encounter with Eva maybe these things wouldn't have happened.
    Mr Birling says "Look Inspector, I'd give thousands" yet he couldn't give a few shillings to his workers.

    2. Significance of Gerald
    Bridges the gap between the older generation and the new generation
    It seems as though he is of similar age to Sheila as they are engaged, but the way he thinks/acts is similar to Mr and Mrs Birling, trying to dismiss the whole thing after the Inspector leaves
    Gerald represents the upper class society and Mr Birling is constantly trying to impress him. When Mr Birling says "I had to dismiss her"(something like that I can't remember) Gerald says that's what my father would have done. This shows that the upper class of society want to cover their own back, make sure that they look good in society and impress other. They do not care about their worker and their conditions (I think Eva wanted half a shilling more or something I can't remember).
    You could say that Gerald was the only one who actually cared for Eva and kept her happy, at least for some time. He gave her a place to stay, gave her food, saved her in the pub from Old Maggarty (I can't remember his name). The others didn't like her, used their power against her and completely emotionally destroyed her.

    Looks like you read the story yesterday haha
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    Thank you so much!!😇
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    (Original post by Ewok94)
    Looks like you read the story yesterday haha
    I loved the play so much, I watched it so many times as well! I used to remember all the quotes, literally:lol:
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    (Original post by ellreeves1)
    Thank you so much!!😇
    No worries
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    1. The importance of guilty consciences in the play is that nobody is ever arrested or anything, Inspector Goole works only to educate the Birling's about their actions. Arthur says 'Still, I can't take any responsibility'; showing how he lacks the decency to accept his responsibility for his role in her death. Only Sheila, and in part Eric, show any of the guilt that Inspector Goole is trying to evoke.

    2. Gerald is similar to Arthur in that he is involved in an established business, with the two companies being 'friendly rivals'. Gerald is almost a young Arthur Birling, shown by his stubborn, business-minded attitude. Whereas Arthur seems too old to have a conscience and accept his role in Eva's death, Gerald is part of the 'new-age' and still has time to change his attitudes to women and working classes.
 
 
 
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