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Possible ASD - think college will help with exam arrangements? watch

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    Hi all,

    Not sure whether this is in the right place, so bear with me.

    I am pretty sure that I am somewhere on the autism spectrum, like really mild asperger disorder? I'm not sure of all of the right words really. I have done a lot of research, and a lot of discussions with a lot of friends, some of whom have a lot of experience with asd. I'm not just saying "oh I've done a few online quizzes and I think I'm autistic now".

    I really want to get a formal assessment but I'm not sure how to bring it up with my parents. I'm not sure how that will affect this.

    My current big issue is that sitting exams is hell. I'm in my first year at college doing A levels in maths, further maths, physics and computer science. I'm not doing amazing at it. I had mock exams in January, and I got Bs in everything except further maths which I got a C in. I'd hoped for As and a B in further maths.

    I got my papers back to go through them in class, and I made so many silly mistakes that I really wouldn't usually make. I think this is because of how stressed and distracted I was being in the sports hall - I had the same issue at GCSE.

    I had literally never been in the sports hall at college so I was very unfamiliar with the environment. Sensory wise, it was too much. The lights were intense, there were so many people. I kept finding myself completely distracted just looking around trying to take everything in. One of the things that I am most sensitive to is people tapping their pens, feet etc. I am known for being an incesant tapper, so I go to the effort in exams to not tap, which just made me even more uncomfortable because that is how I usually focus and stay relaxed enough to be able to concentrate.

    Given all of this, if I brought this up with my tutor, does anyone think that I may be able to have some sort of alternative arrangements? I could do with being at least towards the corner/front of the room so I can't look around so much, but I think I would benefit from being in a seperate, smaller room that I am able to become more familiar with. I have my next set of mock exams in June. I don't want to even bring this up with anyone at college if I'm just going to get told I'm being ridiculous and to suck it up - but I am aware I may be jumping to worst case scenarious there.

    Thanks.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Hi all,

    Not sure whether this is in the right place, so bear with me.

    I am pretty sure that I am somewhere on the autism spectrum, like really mild asperger disorder? I'm not sure of all of the right words really. I have done a lot of research, and a lot of discussions with a lot of friends, some of whom have a lot of experience with asd. I'm not just saying "oh I've done a few online quizzes and I think I'm autistic now".

    I really want to get a formal assessment but I'm not sure how to bring it up with my parents. I'm not sure how that will affect this.

    My current big issue is that sitting exams is hell. I'm in my first year at college doing A levels in maths, further maths, physics and computer science. I'm not doing amazing at it. I had mock exams in January, and I got Bs in everything except further maths which I got a C in. I'd hoped for As and a B in further maths.

    I got my papers back to go through them in class, and I made so many silly mistakes that I really wouldn't usually make. I think this is because of how stressed and distracted I was being in the sports hall - I had the same issue at GCSE.

    I had literally never been in the sports hall at college so I was very unfamiliar with the environment. Sensory wise, it was too much. The lights were intense, there were so many people. I kept finding myself completely distracted just looking around trying to take everything in. One of the things that I am most sensitive to is people tapping their pens, feet etc. I am known for being an incesant tapper, so I go to the effort in exams to not tap, which just made me even more uncomfortable because that is how I usually focus and stay relaxed enough to be able to concentrate.

    Given all of this, if I brought this up with my tutor, does anyone think that I may be able to have some sort of alternative arrangements? I could do with being at least towards the corner/front of the room so I can't look around so much, but I think I would benefit from being in a seperate, smaller room that I am able to become more familiar with. I have my next set of mock exams in June. I don't want to even bring this up with anyone at college if I'm just going to get told I'm being ridiculous and to suck it up - but I am aware I may be jumping to worst case scenarious there.

    Thanks.
    Schools can often put some things in place themselves like letting you sit in a corner of the exam hall or even in a separate room so it's definitely worth asking about.
    A diagnosis can be a big help A because you know what you're dealing with then and B because it can open some more doors in terms of support. As far as that goes I would suggest talking to the student support at your school (tutor should be able to help you get in touch with them). Schools can usually set students up with things like screenings and should know the sort of stuff you need to do and could be able to get in terms of support.

    With telling your parents it really depends on your family. When I though I had LDs I just kinda brought it up one day like "hey I think I may have a thing. Thoughts?". That works fine in my family.
    My parents thought there could be something to it so I spoke to my college's support team, sorted out some basic support that they could offer and got put on the right track for getting a diagnosis.


    So yeah have a chat with your school and see where that takes you. Good luck
 
 
 
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