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    I’m currently a year 12 a-level student studying: Business Studies, Computer Science, History and IT (Camtech extended certificate level 3) with hopes of becoming a game programmer. I’ve been scouring forums looking for advice on the area I wish to go into and it seems that the popular opinion is that somebody with a Computer Science degree is going to be picked over somebody studying, say, a Computing Degree. My original plans were to go for a Computing degree with a focus on game programming however with all the negative comments I’ve now realised having a CS degree is going to keep my option broader. My question is: How far am I going to get, university wise, without having a maths a-level?

    I have seen other people asking this question but opinions seem to be rather divided. I’m not going to be going to university for a couple of years and I’m wondering if anything will change during that time. Thanks, in advance, for everyone’s input.
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    (Original post by db190101)
    I’m currently a year 12 a-level student studying: Business Studies, Computer Science, History and IT (Camtech extended certificate level 3) with hopes of becoming a game programmer. I’ve been scouring forums looking for advice on the area I wish to go into and it seems that the popular opinion is that somebody with a Computer Science degree is going to be picked over somebody studying, say, a Computing Degree. My original plans were to go for a Computing degree with a focus on game programming however with all the negative comments I’ve now realised having a CS degree is going to keep my option broader. My question is: How far am I going to get, university wise, without having a maths a-level?

    I have seen other people asking this question but opinions seem to be rather divided. I’m not going to be going to university for a couple of years and I’m wondering if anything will change during that time. Thanks, in advance, for everyone’s input.
    Yes. You can study CS at a 'good' university without A-Level Maths.

    There is a pinned thread with a list of universities that do not specifically require A-Level Maths here.
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    Appreciate the help, didn’t see that
    (Original post by Blue_Cow)
    Yes. You can study CS at a 'good' university without A-Level Maths.

    There is a pinned thread here with a list of universities that do not specifically require A-Level Maths here.
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    (Original post by db190101)
    I’m currently a year 12 a-level student studying: Business Studies, Computer Science, History and IT (Camtech extended certificate level 3) with hopes of becoming a game programmer. I’ve been scouring forums looking for advice on the area I wish to go into and it seems that the popular opinion is that somebody with a Computer Science degree is going to be picked over somebody studying, say, a Computing Degree. My original plans were to go for a Computing degree with a focus on game programming however with all the negative comments I’ve now realised having a CS degree is going to keep my option broader. My question is: How far am I going to get, university wise, without having a maths a-level?

    I have seen other people asking this question but opinions seem to be rather divided. I’m not going to be going to university for a couple of years and I’m wondering if anything will change during that time. Thanks, in advance, for everyone’s input.
    As Blue_Cow said there are plenty of good unis that don't require A-Level Math. Opinions are divided IMO because they sometimes come from posters who have only ever attended a single uni, using their experience to form opinions of the entirety of CS degrees in the UK. Which is of course not really the best way to do it. It would be better if people prefaced their posts with "At my uni" etc... rather than throwing out blanket statements as if they apply to every UK university.

    I've attended a few unis, visited many more in various capacities for conferences etc... and talked to students from about half the universities in the UK over my career about their CS degrees. As has been said, the amount of math required will vary entirely on your university choice.
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    (Original post by db190101)
    I’m currently a year 12 a-level student studying: Business Studies, Computer Science, History and IT (Camtech extended certificate level 3) with hopes of becoming a game programmer. I’ve been scouring forums looking for advice on the area I wish to go into and it seems that the popular opinion is that somebody with a Computer Science degree is going to be picked over somebody studying, say, a Computing Degree. My original plans were to go for a Computing degree with a focus on game programming however with all the negative comments I’ve now realised having a CS degree is going to keep my option broader. My question is: How far am I going to get, university wise, without having a maths a-level?

    I have seen other people asking this question but opinions seem to be rather divided. I’m not going to be going to university for a couple of years and I’m wondering if anything will change during that time. Thanks, in advance, for everyone’s input.
    I wasn't going to comment however I got an email from my uni which thought might interest you. I'm studying computer science and Cardiff university. It doesn't have a game development specific degree however there are a lot of good connections you can get for gaming in Cardiff so Welsh universities may be good ones to look at.

    There's also the Celtic games show which is a game developer convention usually happening in Cardiff.

    The email I mentioned was this:
    "I would like to take a moment to tell you about Tranzfuser, the games development competition.

    The Tranzfuser hub in Cardiff is looking to build a team of Cardiff University and University of South Wales students to compete in an innovative games development competition

    Students are invited to apply if they want experience in games development, project management, business start-up and want the funding to launch their own games development company

    Teams will work over summer (June - September) to develop a prototype for their game with an allocation of £5,000

    Teams will then showcase their prototype at a high-profile national games show, where they can pitch to win an additional £25,000 to commercialise their game, launch their games development company and*be supported as one of the UK Games Fund portfolio companies"
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    (Original post by Devify)
    I wasn't going to comment however I got an email from my uni which thought might interest you. I'm studying computer science and Cardiff university. It doesn't have a game development specific degree however there are a lot of good connections you can get for gaming in Cardiff so Welsh universities may be good ones to look at.

    There's also the Celtic games show which is a game developer convention usually happening in Cardiff.

    The email I mentioned was this:
    "I would like to take a moment to tell you about Tranzfuser, the games development competition.

    The Tranzfuser hub in Cardiff is looking to build a team of Cardiff University and University of South Wales students to compete in an innovative games development competition

    Students are invited to apply if they want experience in games development, project management, business start-up and want the funding to launch their own games development company

    Teams will work over summer (June - September) to develop a prototype for their game with an allocation of £5,000

    Teams will then showcase their prototype at a high-profile national games show, where they can pitch to win an additional £25,000 to commercialise their game, launch their games development company and*be supported as one of the UK Games Fund portfolio companies"
    I'll have a gander, thanks for the help friend
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    (Original post by db190101)
    I’m currently a year 12 a-level student studying: Business Studies, Computer Science, History and IT (Camtech extended certificate level 3) with hopes of becoming a game programmer. I’ve been scouring forums looking for advice on the area I wish to go into and it seems that the popular opinion is that somebody with a Computer Science degree is going to be picked over somebody studying, say, a Computing Degree. My original plans were to go for a Computing degree with a focus on game programming however with all the negative comments I’ve now realised having a CS degree is going to keep my option broader. My question is: How far am I going to get, university wise, without having a maths a-level?

    I have seen other people asking this question but opinions seem to be rather divided. I’m not going to be going to university for a couple of years and I’m wondering if anything will change during that time. Thanks, in advance, for everyone’s input.
    I am pretty sure you can. although I don't know much about computer science but I wish you the best and just focus on the a levels you are currently doing instead of one you are not :crown:
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    (Original post by db190101)
    ...it seems that the popular opinion is that somebody with a Computer Science degree is going to be picked over somebody studying, say, a Computing Degree.
    I'd take popular opinion with a grain of salt.

    The curriculum framework jointly developed by the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) defines computing as a broader field which encompasses: computer engineering; computer science; information systems; information technology; and software engineering. As such, some computing degrees contain a significant volume of topics drawn from computer science, whilst others may be more balanced, or focus on other areas. Some are very flexible, enabling students to choose modules offered in the department. It varies from institution to institution.

    See: https://www.acm.org/education/curricula-recommendations

    With Regards,
    Michael
 
 
 
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