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Failed University twice. Hopeless.. watch

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    (Original post by liam129)
    That's a really great guide. I'll start working on it first thing tomorrow. I do already use Visual studio 2013 along with visual studio 2015 on my laptop. It's how i first learnt C#, I know how to create classes, methods and I know a few algorithms such as +1 in a method for count or % of a number for a squared number, adding methods/conditions to inputs withing a class etc.

    I think what you sent is the best option, I'll learn everything I can, build an online portfolio and go from there. I'll just have to make sure I take my time to understand fully.

    Is this how you got into software dev?
    Similar, but not quite I started out with a C++ book when I was 13. These kinds of awesome edX courses didn't exist when I was 13. Neither did StackOverflow (I think StackOverflow came along in 2009 ish). Kids got it easy these days

    Visual Studio 2013 and 2015 are OK, although I don't think those let you use the latest version of the C# language - you might find examples which won't compile if you're using older version of Visual Studio. The community edition of 2017 is free and shouldn't take too long to download and install though

    Most of the stuff I know, I owe to Google, and various online programming forums, or books, or StackOverflow, or MSDN and Channel 9 videos. I did study Software Engineering at Uni, but didn't graduate (So I guess I failed as well...). I accepted a permanent job during my sandwich placement year, skipping the final year of the degree altogether. The reality was that I'd learned more in the first 6 months of the placement than in 2 years of the degree course anyway.

    I guess my main bit of advice would be just to focus on making sure that you have the depth understanding above everything else. When it comes down to it, the reason why employers choose graduates (aside from their ability to learn) is for their proven ability to understand and solve complex problems, to reason about different solutions, and to grasp difficult, complex topics. Graduates usually don't have much knowledge about specific technologies, but they do have those problem solving skills - so that's what you're competing against.

    Besides, there's no real benefit in trying to cram knowledge or memorise stuff because that's what Google, MSDN and StackOverflow are for. (Being a C# programmer means that you spend a lot of time finding code snippets or examples on Google..)

    In my opinion, the difference between success and failure in this sort of stuff is really all about how much you enjoy it and whether it really interests you. There's a massive amount of stuff out there which you could learn, but the thing you should be trying to gain through all the courses you take, the books, blogs or articles you read, and the code you write, is making sure that you understand something well enough that you can sit in an interview and show them that you really know what you're talking about. Sometimes the technical questions are straightforward like "What is a constructor"? And other times you'll be asked something deeper such as talking about the pros-and-cons of inheritance-vs-composition in OO Programming.

    One more thing - If you're interested, try spending time being active on StackOverflow. Obviously it's great for asking questions if you get stuck, but on the flipside, you can also challenge yourself by checking the types of questions people ask about C# or .NET on there, and attempt to answer the ones which you think you know, then compare your answer to the ones which receive the most upvotes - you might be surprised at the kinds of things you learn by answering those types of questions and reading what the experts have said. (Sometimes the hardest part is actually understanding what the person asking the question really wants to do...)
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    Try something different to programming. Maybe it isn't for you.
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    (Original post by winterscoming)
    Similar, but not quite I started out with a C++ book when I was 13. These kinds of awesome edX courses didn't exist when I was 13. Neither did StackOverflow (I think StackOverflow came along in 2009 ish). Kids got it easy these days

    Visual Studio 2013 and 2015 are OK, although I don't think those let you use the latest version of the C# language - you might find examples which won't compile if you're using older version of Visual Studio. The community edition of 2017 is free and shouldn't take too long to download and install though

    Most of the stuff I know, I owe to Google, and various online programming forums, or books, or StackOverflow, or MSDN and Channel 9 videos. I did study Software Engineering at Uni, but didn't graduate (So I guess I failed as well...). I accepted a permanent job during my sandwich placement year, skipping the final year of the degree altogether. The reality was that I'd learned more in the first 6 months of the placement than in 2 years of the degree course anyway.

    I guess my main bit of advice would be just to focus on making sure that you have the depth understanding above everything else. When it comes down to it, the reason why employers choose graduates (aside from their ability to learn) is for their proven ability to understand and solve complex problems, to reason about different solutions, and to grasp difficult, complex topics. Graduates usually don't have much knowledge about specific technologies, but they do have those problem solving skills - so that's what you're competing against.

    Besides, there's no real benefit in trying to cram knowledge or memorise stuff because that's what Google, MSDN and StackOverflow are for. (Being a C# programmer means that you spend a lot of time finding code snippets or examples on Google..)

    In my opinion, the difference between success and failure in this sort of stuff is really all about how much you enjoy it and whether it really interests you. There's a massive amount of stuff out there which you could learn, but the thing you should be trying to gain through all the courses you take, the books, blogs or articles you read, and the code you write, is making sure that you understand something well enough that you can sit in an interview and show them that you really know what you're talking about. Sometimes the technical questions are straightforward like "What is a constructor"? And other times you'll be asked something deeper such as talking about the pros-and-cons of inheritance-vs-composition in OO Programming.

    One more thing - If you're interested, try spending time being active on StackOverflow. Obviously it's great for asking questions if you get stuck, but on the flipside, you can also challenge yourself by checking the types of questions people ask about C# or .NET on there, and attempt to answer the ones which you think you know, then compare your answer to the ones which receive the most upvotes - you might be surprised at the kinds of things you learn by answering those types of questions and reading what the experts have said. (Sometimes the hardest part is actually understanding what the person asking the question really wants to do...)
    The only people I've seen who havent got a degree and have a job in software engineering/ development are those who did a placement year. I think that experience helps a lot but I think i'll do as you said. I'll check out those links, build my knowledge, work on some projects, become active on stack overflow and make sure I have a lot to show for it.

    Wish me luck
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    (Original post by CookieButter)
    Try something different to programming. Maybe it isn't for you.
    It's the only thing I see myself doing. It's not that I don't enjoy it or everything is going wrong, I had a really rough patch while at university and I've gotten to a point where I'm not sure where to start as i've always been in education and learnt by being taught.

    I'd definitely have the motivation to go through with the advice given, I'm just making sure I'm taking the right path as I'd hate to choose one that ends up with me nowhere and spend money on something pointless if it was the option I chose.

    I'm just trying to weigh my options is all and get some advice on them
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    (Original post by liam129)
    The only people I've seen who havent got a degree and have a job in software engineering/ development are those who did a placement year. I think that experience helps a lot but I think i'll do as you said. I'll check out those links, build my knowledge, work on some projects, become active on stack overflow and make sure I have a lot to show for it.

    Wish me luck
    Honestly, while the placement year really helped me, the important thing really is being able to get the skills and prove yourself on your CV, interviews, tests, etc. It sounds like you've got a direction to head in now anyway, so definitely wishing you the best of luck with it
 
 
 
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