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    I am currently very unsure as to what I want to do. I am currently studying Foundation Engineering, but I do not know what I want to do afterwards. Initially I wanted to do Civil Engineering as I enjoy the designing part of engineering, but that was really off putting after I learnt about the fact its also about water supply, DAMs and etc.

    I am very keen and enjoy maths and also don't mind drawing as well.

    I would like to get a job as an engineer, where it's mostly office work I suppose? Rather than going out into factories and etc (That was another huge offput for civil engineering).

    Currently, I am thinking of doing Mechanical engineering, but not sure.

    I also learnt that I can go with my foundaition engineering into other sectors, but I am still not sure which one i should choose. Time is also running out. Thinking about my future and having to do a degree and then a job for the rest of my life that I do not enjoy really stresses me out. So yeah..
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    (Original post by Zaynnn)
    I am currently very unsure as to what I want to do. I am currently studying Foundation Engineering, but I do not know what I want to do afterwards. Initially I wanted to do Civil Engineering as I enjoy the designing part of engineering, but that was really off putting after I learnt about the fact its also about water supply, DAMs and etc.

    I am very keen and enjoy maths and also don't mind drawing as well.

    I would like to get a job as an engineer, where it's mostly office work I suppose? Rather than going out into factories and etc (That was another huge offput for civil engineering).

    Currently, I am thinking of doing Mechanical engineering, but not sure.

    I also learnt that I can go with my foundaition engineering into other sectors, but I am still not sure which one i should choose. Time is also running out. Thinking about my future and having to do a degree and then a job for the rest of my life that I do not enjoy really stresses me out. So yeah..
    I think it would be quite rare for a civil engineer to go into a factory... civil engineers usually deal with buildings and infrastructure, such as roads, bridges, water etc.

    If you want to get a job doing calculations and drawings then work in design and/or analysis, which is typically done in the office. Whether you study mechanical or civil doesn't matter in that respect - any discipline of engineering degree can get you jobs in design/analysis (and, likewise, any engineering degree can get you field/onsite based jobs, too).

    Do you like buildings or things that move, like machines?
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    (Original post by Smack)
    I think it would be quite rare for a civil engineer to go into a factory... civil engineers usually deal with buildings and infrastructure, such as roads, bridges, water etc.

    If you want to get a job doing calculations and drawings then work in design and/or analysis, which is typically done in the office. Whether you study mechanical or civil doesn't matter in that respect - any discipline of engineering degree can get you jobs in design/analysis (and, likewise, any engineering degree can get you field/onsite based jobs, too).

    Do you like buildings or things that move, like machines?
    This is what I am not sure about. I don't really love them both, but I don't mind doing it. I kind of more prefer machines
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    (Original post by Zaynnn)
    This is what I am not sure about. I don't really love them both, but I don't mind doing it. I kind of more prefer machines
    You don't necessarily have to "love" either... if you're more interested in machinery then mechanical would be more suitable. But, ideally, what would you be doing or working with, in terms of engineered artefacts, such as machines, buildings, bridges, computers, planes etc.?
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    (Original post by Zaynnn)
    I am currently very unsure as to what I want to do. I am currently studying Foundation Engineering, but I do not know what I want to do afterwards. Initially I wanted to do Civil Engineering as I enjoy the designing part of engineering, but that was really off putting after I learnt about the fact its also about water supply, DAMs and etc.

    I am very keen and enjoy maths and also don't mind drawing as well.

    I would like to get a job as an engineer, where it's mostly office work I suppose? Rather than going out into factories and etc (That was another huge offput for civil engineering).

    Currently, I am thinking of doing Mechanical engineering, but not sure.

    I also learnt that I can go with my foundaition engineering into other sectors, but I am still not sure which one i should choose. Time is also running out. Thinking about my future and having to do a degree and then a job for the rest of my life that I do not enjoy really stresses me out. So yeah..
    I've got a friend who is a civil engineer who works in offices. She works on plans for large structural projects particularly ports. Seems to involve feasibility studies, checking the technical specifications and ensuring that the structures are safe and then working with the financiers.

    Have you looked at general engineering degrees where you specialise in later years?
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    (Original post by ajj2000)
    I've got a friend who is a civil engineer who works in offices. She works on plans for large structural projects particularly ports. Seems to involve feasibility studies, checking the technical specifications and ensuring that the structures are safe and then working with the financiers.

    Have you looked at general engineering degrees where you specialise in later years?
    Yes, I was interested in structural or design engineering. After making some more research, I found aeronautical engineering very interesting, but realised job prospects were low for that, which is why I am considering studying mechanical engineering than afterwards see what I would do next.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    You don't necessarily have to "love" either... if you're more interested in machinery then mechanical would be more suitable. But, ideally, what would you be doing or working with, in terms of engineered artefacts, such as machines, buildings, bridges, computers, planes etc.?
    I have most interest towards planes, then maybe buildings or machines?
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    (Original post by Zaynnn)
    Yes, I was interested in structural or design engineering. After making some more research, I found aeronautical engineering very interesting, but realised job prospects were low for that, which is why I am considering studying mechanical engineering than afterwards see what I would do next.
    They all look like great degrees to me - both for engineering careers and for the skills you learn should you wish to do something else.

    Are there any university open days/ intro to engineering courses you can go on?
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    (Original post by ajj2000)
    They all look like great degrees to me - both for engineering careers and for the skills you learn should you wish to do something else.

    Are there any university open days/ intro to engineering courses you can go on?
    Yeah, I'm going to an open day next week for Civil Engineering, so I might check out mechanical engineering as well.
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    (Original post by Zaynnn)
    I have most interest towards planes, then maybe buildings or machines?
    Aeronautical/aerospace might also be worth a look, then. Although overall it's quite similar to mechanical.
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    Like Smack says, there will be specific design and analysis jobs open to you regardless of the type of engineering you engage in!

    I found a website that lays everything out there in one page that may help you decide which one is right for you. Mechanical is definitely good for a general step into engineering that may still allow you to specialize later on. Another good way to help you decide, is to check out job listings for each type of engineering and see which roles speak to you most--focus on the responsibilities and description. For example: aerodynamic design, and mechanical engineer roles.
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    (Original post by Michelle Bieger)
    Like Smack says, there will be specific design and analysis jobs open to you regardless of the type of engineering you engage in!

    I found a website that lays everything out there in one page that may help you decide which one is right for you. Mechanical is definitely good for a general step into engineering that may still allow you to specialize later on. Another good way to help you decide, is to check out job listings for each type of engineering and see which roles speak to you most--focus on the responsibilities and description. For example: aerodynamic design, and mechanical engineer roles.
    Yeah, I have looked at those websites. To be honest, I don't really seem interested entirely in any of them. I only have a bit of interest on mechanical engineering and maybe civil. I'm thinking of looking at other areas such as accounting and etc just to see how that is. I suppose I want a job that has either maths, desigining or anything that has not to do with having to do field work. Field work is a huge offput for me.
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    also thank you to everyone replying. Really appreciate it
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    (Original post by Zaynnn)
    Yeah, I have looked at those websites. To be honest, I don't really seem interested entirely in any of them. I only have a bit of interest on mechanical engineering and maybe civil. I'm thinking of looking at other areas such as accounting and etc just to see how that is. I suppose I want a job that has either maths, desigining or anything that has not to do with having to do field work. Field work is a huge offput for me.
    I don't think in design and analysis roles you will have to do field work--my brother, for example, does an aero-engineering role and on his team, they only engage in field work if they want to. (Side note--earlier you said there were low job prospects in this field. If you really love this field, please ignore that. All "low job prospects" translates to is that you need to have passion for the field, because you'll have to prove you want the job maybe more so than other jobs--and if you do actually have the passion, you'll automatically be doing things for the field that make you stand out, such as taking placements throughout the year.)

    Accounting will have lots of maths, but won't really engage in the designing love that you seem to have. Have you thought about architecture? What about robotics, since you mentioned a love of machines? Another thing you could do is look at the modules that would be taught on engineering/architecture/robotics/whatever course you're looking at--it doesn't matter which Uni when it comes to this stage and just seeing what the course is like. If you really enjoy the first (and maybe second year!) modules, that might help guide you into the field you really like as well.
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    (Original post by Zaynnn)
    Yeah, I have looked at those websites. To be honest, I don't really seem interested entirely in any of them. I only have a bit of interest on mechanical engineering and maybe civil. I'm thinking of looking at other areas such as accounting and etc just to see how that is. I suppose I want a job that has either maths, desigining or anything that has not to do with having to do field work. Field work is a huge offput for me.
    Have you considered studying a maths or physics degree if you're looking for a mathematical type job?
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    (Original post by Zaynnn)
    Yeah, I have looked at those websites. To be honest, I don't really seem interested entirely in any of them. I only have a bit of interest on mechanical engineering and maybe civil. I'm thinking of looking at other areas such as accounting and etc just to see how that is. I suppose I want a job that has either maths, desigining or anything that has not to do with having to do field work. Field work is a huge offput for me.
    You can spend an entire career in engineering without doing hands-on engineering, and/or leaving an office.

    Also a reasonable proportion of Engineering grads go into other areas for their careers. Notably finance.

    But I'd caution against embarking on an Engineering course unless you had some interest in engineering.

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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    You can spend an entire career in engineering without doing hands-on engineering, and/or leaving an office.

    Also a reasonable proportion of Engineering grads go into other areas for their careers. Notably finance.

    But I'd caution against embarking on an Engineering course unless you had some interest in engineering.

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    What do you mean? Do you mean, for example, if I graduate mechanical engineering, I can get a job on mechanical engineering but which is more based on finance? ...
    Can you give me some examples of what you mean, thanks.
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    (Original post by Zaynnn)
    What do you mean? Do you mean, for example, if I graduate mechanical engineering, I can get a job on mechanical engineering but which is more based on finance? ...
    Can you give me some examples of what you mean, thanks.
    No, I mean you can go into the finance sector - e.g. investment banking.

    It's worth saying most jobs (ie not engineering) don't even specify a subject. So any degree course would be acceptable.
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    (Original post by Zaynnn)
    What do you mean? Do you mean, for example, if I graduate mechanical engineering, I can get a job on mechanical engineering but which is more based on finance? ...
    Can you give me some examples of what you mean, thanks.
    you can use engineering degree to go into a completely different, non-engineering job because the mathematical and other skills you gain is good for a lot of jobs out there.
 
 
 
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