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    I'm doing my exam with WJEC this year (at my teacher's insistence...) and there's a deadline next Tuesday for me to submit my study hypothesis. However, I'm a bit lost on what to do. My teacher refuses to let us contact her outside of school hours so I have no way of asking her until it's already due.

    I've been thinking of looking into the difference between the same book adapted for a younger audience and an older one. (The Bible? Does anyone have any suggestions?) But my teacher said that wasn't specific enough.

    Any thoughts?
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    There are plenty of 'classic' stories adapted for a younger audience; Treasure Island, Jane Eyre etc. I'm not sure what a study of that would show though, apart from what the editor thought would be tricky grammar or lexis. I have seen a good analysis of a modernised children's book. Some of the Enid Blyton Famous Five series were rewritten a few years back, taking out language that was considered archaic or which is now unacceptable because of semantic shift or less tolerance of social prejudices. You would have to source both editions and find an extract of several pages to compare. I don't think the modern versions sold very well, so they might not still be in print.
    I've also seen an analysis of language changes made when a book is adapted into a film. The candidate looked at Lord of the Rings and Pride and Prejudice and investigated how and why changes were made. In some cases it was simply to shorten a conversation to fit the requirements of time, in other cases archaic words and phrases had been modernised.
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    (Original post by Lit teacher)
    There are plenty of 'classic' stories adapted for a younger audience; Treasure Island, Jane Eyre etc. I'm not sure what a study of that would show though, apart from what the editor thought would be tricky grammar or lexis. I have seen a good analysis of a modernised children's book. Some of the Enid Blyton Famous Five series were rewritten a few years back, taking out language that was considered archaic or which is now unacceptable because of semantic shift or less tolerance of social prejudices. You would have to source both editions and find an extract of several pages to compare. I don't think the modern versions sold very well, so they might not still be in print.
    I've also seen an analysis of language changes made when a book is adapted into a film. The candidate looked at Lord of the Rings and Pride and Prejudice and investigated how and why changes were made. In some cases it was simply to shorten a conversation to fit the requirements of time, in other cases archaic words and phrases had been modernised.
    What about the Brothers Grimm Fairytales? ie. the Little Mermaid, when compared to a child-friendly version (which I already own) or the movie?
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    (Original post by Doyle12)
    What about the Brothers Grimm Fairytales? ie. the Little Mermaid, when compared to a child-friendly version (which I already own) or the movie?
    You have the problem that Grimm's fairy tales are translations of the original, and there are different versions. You would need to be able to identify a particular edition and know when it was written, but even then you wouldn't know how much of the language choices were made because of it being a direct translation from a German original and how many were the new writer trying to add their own style. For example, a complex grammatical structure that might seem out of place could be typical of English at the time, or it might just be a word-for-word translation of the original.
    If you do use your example of the Little Mermaid you will not know which version of the book was used as a starting point for the Disney film script, so any differences or similarities that you spot may be coincidental.
    Whatever your choice of text, you need to be able to justify it as providing the best evidence for the investigation you want to make. If you come at it from the other way, ('I have this book, what can I use it for'), the investigation is likely to be less successful. I would advise you to think about the area of investigation that interests you the most and then think about the texts you will need to work on this.
 
 
 
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