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Rise of the Robots watch

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    (Original post by Dheorl)
    Lol, there have been multiple times when I've had to point out passages you've clearly just skimmed over.

    Highly specialised fields will be mechanised just like anything else. It's the repeatability that makes something easy to automate. Diagnosis of disease is a very repeatable process. Designing of structural components is a very repeatable process. If anything, your example of hairdresser is much less likely to fade away than for instance a GP. This isn't hypothetical drivel, it's already proven possible.

    And no, calling something "hypothetical drivel" isn't even remotely "giving me the courtesy of replying". It's being a downright ******* purely because you don't understand something. I have replied to every single point you've put forward. If you can't be bothered to read and understand them, then again, not my problem.
    Okay, my dude, let's just leave it here.
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    (Original post by HighOnGoofballs)
    Okay, my dude, let's just leave it here.
    Lol, so much for "giving me the courtesy of replying". Such a hypocritical troll it's almost funny.
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    (Original post by Dheorl)
    Highly specialised fields will be mechanised just like anything else. It's the repeatability that makes something easy to automate. Diagnosis of disease is a very repeatable process. Designing of structural components is a very repeatable process. If anything, your example of hairdresser is much less likely to fade away than for instance a GP. This isn't hypothetical drivel, it's already proven possible.

    And no, calling something "hypothetical drivel" isn't even remotely "giving me the courtesy of replying". It's being a downright ******* purely because you don't understand something. I have replied to every single point you've put forward. If you can't be bothered to read and understand them, then again, not my problem.
    Well, the discussion we were having was the backdrop of robots mechanising 50% of the economy. That's why I said that the highly specialised fields would be the last to be mechanised. Like it or not, but just because something is repeating, doesn't mean it doesn't need a human performing it. Doctors learn a lot of ethics. As do Lawyers. Maybe someday we can inject 'feelings' into robots, but at the point in time where the economy is only 50% mechanised, that wouldn't be the case. So no, the wouldn't be mechanised straight away, it would take much longer for things that require ethics to be mechanised than jobs like a plumber. A hairdresser needs not ethics. It's a mechanical task of cutting hair the particular way a person wants it. The first point is therefore debunked entirely.

    I called that comment hypothetical drivel because frankly, that's exactly what it was. You gave a **** answer. Simply put. You cant just reply with 'utopia' and expect the other person to be content. Or even not annoyed.

    (Original post by Dheorl)
    Lol, so much for "giving me the courtesy of replying". Such a hypocritical troll it's almost funny.
    mmmm...k

    You've got your reply. Don't bother replying back. I'm done with this useless exchange.
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    (Original post by HighOnGoofballs)
    Well, the discussion we were having was the backdrop of robots mechanising 50% of the economy. That's why I said that the highly specialised fields would be the last to be mechanised. Like it or not, but just because something is repeating, doesn't mean it doesn't need a human performing it. Doctors learn a lot of ethics. As do Lawyers. Maybe someday we can inject 'feelings' into robots, but at the point in time where the economy is only 50% mechanised, that wouldn't be the case. So no, the wouldn't be mechanised straight away, it would take much longer for things that require ethics to be mechanised than jobs like a plumber. A hairdresser needs not ethics. It's a mechanical task of cutting hair the particular way a person wants it. The first point is therefore debunked entirely.

    I called that comment hypothetical drivel because frankly, that's exactly what it was. You gave a **** answer. Simply put. You cant just reply with 'utopia' and expect the other person to be content. Or even not annoyed.
    Yes, some Drs have to show a degree of ethics, but it's by no means a requirement for many positions. I don't know if you've ever been in a hospital much, but a lot of consultants will walk around with a troupe of attendants in tow, grunt at the occasional chart and then go sit and figure out what drugs to give you next. What part of that can't be done much quicker and more accurately by a machine with access to information about every illness anyone has suffered in the country over the past decade? Even if you think we still need the Drs for the comfort part, the amount of work they have to put in is greatly reduced and it's of a much lower skill level.

    You can't just randomly claim certain jobs will take longer to automate because it fits the picture you'r trying to paint. And if you get annoyed at something you don't understand then again, not my problem.
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    (Original post by Dheorl)
    Well the ideal situation is obviously using robots leads to greater production at reduced cost resulting in a lower cost of living. Jobs can then be split up, so everyone can work less hours at what jobs remain and still live comfortable lives...
    I think there would have to be a big cultural change for enough people to start choosing part-time work over income maximisation. People generally always find things they want more money for before they prefer more time. Might people have to 'draw straws' or otherwise compete for the full-time jobs in order to buy the luxury goods/services they desire? It's an interesting possibility
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    (Original post by Axiomasher)
    I think there would have to be a big cultural change for enough people to start choosing part-time work over income maximisation. People generally always find things they want more money for before they prefer more time. Might people have to 'draw straws' or otherwise compete for the full-time jobs in order to buy the luxury goods/services they desire? It's an interesting possibility
    The increased number of people who are choosing "the van life", becoming digital nomads, taking a big international trip every year etc. I think that cultural change is already happening. Maybe much like the swinging 60s it's a phase purely for the young'uns that will pass, but hopefully the lessened tie to material goods will stick around this time.
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    (Original post by Axiomasher)
    There have been many false starts in the claim that machines will render most of us unemployed but there are signs that we are, finally, on the cusp of an era in which automation, AI and advanced robotics are looming over us with this threat. Increasingly, stories about research suggest that even professional decision-making activities such as those undertaken by medical specialists and lawyers are about to fall victim to algorithmic self-learning systems which can outperform even well-educated humans.

    Defenders of the advances in such labour technologisation (I might have made that word up) usually tell us that as some employment sectors are handed over to machines so new sectors open up for actual humans. But maybe there are only so many new sectors that can open up and isn't it usually the case that new sectors are themselves highly automated anyway?

    The possibility of tens (hundreds?) of thousands of lorry drivers, supermarket assistants and call-centre workers being rendered unnecessary in a matter of a decade or two would be significant enough but AI might allow the replacement of much more than that.

    The obvious block on this scenario is that mass unemployment would lead to a shrinking of markets - unemployed people don't generally have the same spending power as those who are waged so the process of such 'advance' has a self-defeating quality to it.

    What do you think?
    Perhaps someone can shed some light on this - what is going to happen to all the bus drivers, train drivers, taxi drivers, aeroplane pilots, warehouse workers, production line workers, field pickers, dustbin workers, cleaners? (this isn't an exhaustive list, just all I can think of at the moment )

    Even lawyers, accountants, doctors, nurses, surgeons, dentists are in danger of having their jobs automated.

    What is going to replace all these jobs if machines can do them? I don't understand what sectors will open up to replace such jobs.
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    The return of the luddites.
    I could certainly envisage an army of impoverished ex taxi drivers smashing the windscreens of driverless taxis whenever they see them parked up waiting for a fare.
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    (Original post by snowman77)
    Perhaps someone can shed some light on this - what is going to happen to all the bus drivers, train drivers, taxi drivers, aeroplane pilots, warehouse workers, production line workers, field pickers, dustbin workers, cleaners? (this isn't an exhaustive list, just all I can think of at the moment )

    Even lawyers, accountants, doctors, nurses, surgeons, dentists are in danger of having their jobs automated.

    What is going to replace all these jobs if machines can do them? I don't understand what sectors will open up to replace such jobs.
    Having just finished the last episode of Altered Carbon ( highly recommended) I would suggest they are going to wander the rainy streets only stopping to eat noodles and Chinese food at street side food vendors.
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    (Original post by snowman77)
    Perhaps someone can shed some light on this - what is going to happen to all the bus drivers, train drivers, taxi drivers, aeroplane pilots, warehouse workers, production line workers, field pickers, dustbin workers, cleaners? (this isn't an exhaustive list, just all I can think of at the moment )

    Even lawyers, accountants, doctors, nurses, surgeons, dentists are in danger of having their jobs automated.

    What is going to replace all these jobs if machines can do them? I don't understand what sectors will open up to replace such jobs.
    Pretty much impossible to say without a crystal ball dictating what we'll invent in the next 50 years. When production started to become more automated with the industrial revolution, I doubt anyone predicted that such a thing as a taxi would exist. As mentioned, ideally, as was the case with the industrial revolution, work/life balance improves.

    I still think "skilled" jobs will become automated, or at least assisted, at a similar rate.
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    (Original post by Just my opinion)
    The return of the luddites.
    I could certainly envisage an army of impoverished ex taxi drivers smashing the windscreens of driverless taxis whenever they see them parked up waiting for a fare.
    The robot police force will be waiting to arrest them.
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    (Original post by Axiomasher)
    The robot police force will be waiting to arrest them.
    Fascist Pigs " PAAAR TE DA PEEEEPOLE". 💪👊😁
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    (Original post by Dheorl)
    Pretty much impossible to say without a crystal ball dictating what we'll invent in the next 50 years. When production started to become more automated with the industrial revolution, I doubt anyone predicted that such a thing as a taxi would exist. As mentioned, ideally, as was the case with the industrial revolution, work/life balance improves.

    I still think "skilled" jobs will become automated, or at least assisted, at a similar rate.
    That's true, but we will reach a point where machines can do literally everything. Even creative things like music and art. Then what jobs will humans do?
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    (Original post by snowman77)
    That's true, but we will reach a point where machines can do literally everything. Even creative things like music and art. Then what jobs will humans do?
    Anything where the value comes from the human interaction itself. For instance, one thing I've done in the past and would happily do again in the future is mountain guiding. There's no way a robot is ever going to do that job, not because a robot couldn't one day get someone safely to the top of a mountain, but because that's not what people pay for. They pay for the experience; to sit around at the mountain hut at the end of the day and listen to stories of stupid people falling down crevasses, they pay to laugh when you sneakily throw a snowball at their mate. Even if a robot could do all that, hold a conversation etc, purely the fact that it isn't a human doing it causes it to lose it's value.

    In the same way with any sort of live performance, be it theatre or singing or comedy or whatever. Even stupid things like room service. Sure, a robot can carry some food to your room, and in hotels like travel lodge that will almost undoubtably be the case in the future, but people will pay that little bit extra to have someone ask how their day was and it be a fellow human being who at least pretends to care. I've been to restaurants where you order the food and pay on a computer and a bus boy (who may as well be a robot) silently drops it off at your table. Even I'd pay a little extra to have a human server.
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    (Original post by Dheorl)
    Anything where the value comes from the human interaction itself..
    This is probably only a relatively small sector though and it's not impossible that one day robots can charm and amuse us in this way. Besides, lots of people don't have the kind of personality or skills to do that kind of customer-service work.
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    (Original post by Axiomasher)
    This is probably only a relatively small sector though and it's not impossible that one day robots can charm and amuse us in this way. Besides, lots of people don't have the kind of personality or skills to do that kind of customer-service work.
    Even if robots can be taught to hold a conversation (which we're very close to) it still doesn't hold the same value of a real recount by a real person. Humans are essentially herd/pack animals, we're evolutionary programmed to desire information about other peoples lives. Sure, I could load a story about where I abseiled down a crevasse into hundreds of robots and they would retell it many times over, but people wouldn't pay as much to listen. It is a relatively small sector, but as more people have to work less hours there'll be more leisure time and more demand for such services.
 
 
 
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